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  • Public defence: 2017-03-03 13:00 Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Örebro
    Melinder, Carren Anyango
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Physical and psychological characteristics in adolescence and risk of gastrointestinal disease in adulthood2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Physical fitness and stress resilience may influence the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) disease. High physical fitness level may reduce levels of systemic inflammation while psychosocial stress exposure can increase inflammation levels and intestinal permeability. The main objectives are to evaluate if poorer physical fitness and stress resilience in adolescence are associated with a raised risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and GI infections in adulthood and to assess evidence of causality.

    Materials and methods: Swedish registers provided information on a cohort of approximately 250,000 men who underwent military conscription assessments in late adolescence (1969 –1976) with follow-up until December 2009 (up to age 57 years). Cox regression evaluated the associations of physical fitness and stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent GI disease risk in adulthood.

    Results and conclusions: IBD: Poor physical fitness was associated with an increased risk of IBD. The association may be explained (in part) by prodromal disease activity reducing exercise capacity and therefore fitness. Low stress resilience was associated with an increased risk of receiving an IBD diagnosis. Stress may not be an important cause of IBD but may increase the likelihood of conversion from subclinical to symptomatic disease. PUD: Low stress resilience was associated with an increased risk of PUD. This may be explained by a combination of physiological and behavioural mechanisms that increase susceptibility to H. pylori infections and other risk factors. GI infections: Low stress resilience was associated with a reduced risk of GI infections, including enteric infections rather than the hypothesised increased risk.

    List of papers
    1. Physical Fitness in Adolescence and Subsequent Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Fitness in Adolescence and Subsequent Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk
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    2015 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 6, e121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Physical fitness may reduce systemic inflammation levels relevant to the risk of symptomatic Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC); we assessed if fitness in adolescence is associated with subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk, independent of markers of risk and prodromal disease activity.

    Methods: Swedish registers provided information on a cohort of 240,984 men (after exclusions) who underwent military conscription assessments in late adolescence (1969-1976). Follow-up started at least 4 years after the conscription assessment until 31 December 2009 (up to age 57 years). Cox's regression assessed the association of physical fitness with CD (n=986) and UC (n=1,878) in separate models, with adjustment including: socioeconomic conditions in childhood; physical fitness, height, body mass index, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in adolescence; and subsequent diagnoses of IBD.

    Results: Low fitness was associated with a raised risk of IBD, with unadjusted hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.62 (1.31-2.00) for CD and 1.36 (1.17-1.59) for UC. The results were attenuated by adjustment, particularly for markers of prodromal disease activity to 1.32 (1.05-1.66) and 1.25 (1.06-1.48), respectively. Raised ESR in adolescence was associated with increased risks for subsequent CD (5.95 (4.47-7.92)) and UC (1.92 (1.46-2.52)).

    Conclusions: The inverse association of physical fitness with IBD risk is consistent with a protective role for exercise. However, evidence of disease activity before diagnosis was already present in adolescence, suggesting that some or all of the association between fitness and IBD may be due to prodromal disease activity reducing exercise capacity and therefore fitness.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: Nature Publishing Group, 2015
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47188 (URN)10.1038/ctg.2015.49 (DOI)000372104700002 ()26540026 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946544131 (ScopusID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 521-2011-2764
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare

    UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

    Örebro University

    Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Stress resilience and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a cohort study of men living in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress resilience and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a cohort study of men living in Sweden
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    2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, e014315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if low psychosocial stress resilience in adolescence (increasing chronic stress arousal throughout life) is associated with an increased inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk in adulthood. Subclinical Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) can exist over many years and we hypothesise that psychosocial stress may result in conversion to symptomatic disease through its proinflammatory or barrier function effects.

    DESIGN: National register-based cohort study of men followed from late adolescence to middle age.

    SETTING: A general population cohort of men in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Swedish population-based registers provided information on all men born between 1952 and 1956 who underwent mandatory Swedish military conscription assessment (n=239 591). Men with any gastrointestinal diagnoses (except appendicitis) prior to follow-up were excluded.

    PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: An inpatient or outpatient diagnosis of CD or UC recorded in the Swedish Patient Register (1970-2009).

    RESULTS: A total of 938 men received a diagnosis of CD and 1799 UC. Lower stress resilience in adolescence was associated with increased IBD risk, with unadjusted HRs (95% CIs) of 1.54 (1.26 to 1.88) and 1.24 (1.08 to 1.42), for CD and UC, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, including markers of subclinical disease activity in adolescence, they are 1.39 (1.13 to 1.71) and 1.19 (1.03 to 1.37).

    CONCLUSIONS: Lower stress resilience may increase the risk of diagnosis of IBD in adulthood, possibly through an influence on inflammation or barrier function.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
    National Category
    Family Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55376 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014315 (DOI)28130207 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Decreased stress resilience in young men significantly increases the risk of subsequent peptic ulcer disease: a prospective study of 233 093 men in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased stress resilience in young men significantly increases the risk of subsequent peptic ulcer disease: a prospective study of 233 093 men in Sweden
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    2015 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 41, no 10, 1005-1015 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychosocial stress may influence peptic ulcer disease (PUD) risk, but it can be difficult to identify reliably whether stressful exposures pre-dated disease. The association of stress resilience (susceptibility to stress) with subsequent PUD risk has been incompletely investigated.

    AIM: To assess if stress resilience in adolescence is associated with subsequent PUD risk.

    METHODS: The participants comprised of 233 093 men resident in Sweden, born 1952-1956 and assessed for compulsory military conscription during 1969-1976, with data provided by national Swedish registers. Stress resilience was evaluated through semi-structured interviews by a certified psychologist. Cox regression assessed the association between stress resilience in adolescence and the risk of PUD from 1985 to 2009, between ages 28 and 57 years, with adjustment for parental socioeconomic index, household crowding and number of siblings in childhood, as well as cognitive function and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in adolescence.

    RESULTS: In total, 2259 first PUD diagnoses were identified. Lower stress resilience in adolescence is associated with a higher risk of PUD in subsequent adulthood: compared with high resilience, the adjusted hazard ratios (and 95% CI) are 1.84 (1.61-2.10) and 1.23 (1.09-1.38) for low and moderate stress resilience, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: Stress may be implicated in the aetiology of PUD and low stress resilience is a marker of risk.

    National Category
    Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44576 (URN)10.1111/apt.13168 (DOI)000353050600009 ()25809417 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84927778283 (ScopusID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare

    UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

    Örebro University

    Available from: 2015-05-08 Created: 2015-05-08 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Resilience to stress and risk of gastrointestinal infections
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience to stress and risk of gastrointestinal infections
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Family Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55379 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
  • Public defence: 2017-03-03 13:15 Örebro universitet, Forumhuset, Hörsal F, Örebro
    Nothhaft, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Moments of lobbying: an ethnographic study of meetings between lobbyists and politicians2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to define and further the understanding of the practice of lobbying as it manifests in the participants’ interactions with each other and to identify its specific conditions (rules, standards, traits).

    A research overview shows that lobbying as a political phenomenon is well researched, but that the action per se tends to been taken for granted as ‘talking’. Communication between lobbyists and politicians has predominantly been reconstructed as transmission, informationexchange. The study addresses this deficiency by applying an ethnographic method, shadowing, and by focussing on the micro-level of lobbying as a socio-political phenomenon. Lobbying is researched in moments of interaction between interest representatives and representatives of the political system, i.e. MEPs and their assistants.

    Seven lobbyists and politicians in Brussels have been shadowed for one week each; a further 34 interviews were conducted. The analytical strategy was to infer from the actors’ impression management (Goffman). The study is informed by a neo-institutional perspective. It assumes that cognitive, normative, and regulative structures provide meaning to social behavior, and that these resources are identifiable.

    Goffman’s concept of team and the distinction between frontstage and backstage emerged as central categories. My results suggest that the small world of the EU’s capital results in a sense of ‘us in Brussels’ shared by lobbyists, politicians and assistants alike. Lobbying-interaction in frontstage-mode is governed by strict conventions; ignorance or transgression are sanctioned as unprofessional. The key result, however, is that lobbyists actively work towards engagement on other terms. Lobbyists employ various strategies and build relations with politicians in order to create moments of backstage-interaction. In backstage-mode, lobbyists not only gain access to soft information, but can negotiate ways of working together with politicians in pursuit of different, but partly overlapping agendas.

  • Public defence: 2017-03-10 09:30 Örebro universitet, Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Örebro
    Bergh, Cecilia
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Life-course influences on occurrence and outcome for stroke and coronary heart disease2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although typical clinical onset does not occur until adulthood, cardiovascular disease (CVD) may have a long natural history with accumulation of risks beginning in early life and continuing through childhood and into adolescence and adulthood. Therefore, it is important to adopt a life-course approach to explore accumulation of risks, as well as identifying age-defined windows of susceptibility, from early life to disease onset. This thesis examines characteristics in adolescence and adulthood linked with subsequent risk of CVD. One area is concerned with physical and psychological characteristics in adolescence, which reflects inherited and acquired elements from childhood, and their association with occurrence and outcome of subsequent stroke and coronary heart disease many years later. The second area focuses on severe infections and subsequent delayed risk of CVD. Data from several Swedish registers were used to provide information on a general population-based cohort of men. Some 284 198 males, born in Sweden from 1952 to 1956 and included in the Swedish Military Conscription Register, form the basis of the study cohort for this thesis. Our results indicate that characteristics already present in adolescence may have an important role in determining long-term cardiovascular health. Stress resilience in adolescence was associated with an increased risk of stroke and CHD, working in part through other CVD factors, in particular physical fitness. Stress resilience, unhealthy BMI and elevated blood pressure in adolescence were also associated with aspects of stroke severity among survivors of a first stroke. We demonstrated an association for severe infections (hospital admission for sepsis and pneumonia) in adulthood with subsequent delayed risk of CVD, independent of risk factors from adolescence. Persistent systemic inflammatory activity which could follow infection, and that might persist long after infections resolve, represents a possible mechanism. Interventions to protect against CVD should begin by adolescence; and there may be a period of heightened susceptibility in the years following severe infection when additional monitoring and interventions for CVD may be of value.

    List of papers
    1. Stress resilience in male adolescents and subsequent stroke risk: cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress resilience in male adolescents and subsequent stroke risk: cohort study
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    2014 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 85, no 12, 1331-1336 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Exposure to psychosocial stress has been identified as a possible stroke risk, but the role of stress resilience which may be relevant to chronic exposure is uncertain. We investigated the association of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent stroke risk.

    Methods Register-based cohort study. Some 237 879 males born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Cox regression estimated the association of stress resilience with stroke, after adjustment for established stroke risk factors.

    Results Some 3411 diagnoses of first stroke were identified. Lowest stress resilience (21.8%) compared with the highest (23.7%) was associated with increased stroke risk, producing unadjusted HR (with 95% CIs) of 1.54 (1.40 to 1.70). The association attenuated slightly to 1.48 (1.34 to 1.63) after adjustment for markers of socioeconomic circumstances in childhood; and after further adjustment for markers of development and disease in adolescence (blood pressure, cognitive function and pre-existing cardiovascular disease) to 1.30 (1.18 to 1.45). The greatest reduction followed further adjustment for markers of physical fitness (BMI and physical working capacity) in adolescence to 1.16 (1.04 to 1.29). The results were consistent when stroke was subdivided into fatal, ischaemic and haemorrhagic, with higher magnitude associations for fatal rather than non-fatal, and for haemorrhagic rather than ischaemic stroke.

    Conclusions Stress susceptibility and, therefore, psychosocial stress may be implicated in the aetiology of stroke. This association may be explained, in part, by poorer physical fitness. Effective prevention might focus on behaviour/lifestyle and psychosocial stress.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2014
    Keyword
    stroke
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35058 (URN)10.1136/jnnp-2013-307485 (DOI)000345276400010 ()2-s2.0-84896691316 (ScopusID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001 ES/J019119/1

    Stiftelsen Olle Engqvist Byggmästare 

    Örebro University 

    Available from: 2014-05-15 Created: 2014-05-15 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age
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    2015 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 8, 623-629 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Psychosocial stress is a suggested risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent CHD risk is underinvestigated, so our objective was to assess this and investigate the possible mediating role of physical fitness.

    METHODS: In this register-based study, 237 980 men born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Stress resilience was measured at a compulsory military conscription examination using a semistructured interview with a psychologist. Some 10 581 diagnoses of CHD were identified. Cox regression estimated the association of stress resilience with CHD, with adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors.

    RESULTS: Low-stress resilience was associated with increased CHD risk. The association remained after adjustment for physical fitness and other potential confounding and mediating factors, with adjusted HRs (and 95% CIs) of 1.17 (1.10 to 1.25), with some evidence of mediation by physical fitness. CHD incidence rates per 1000 person-years (and 95% CIs) for low-stress, medium-stress and high-stress resilience were 2.61 (2.52 to 2.70), 1.97 (1.92 to 2.03) and 1.59 (1.53 to 1.67) respectively. Higher physical fitness was inversely associated with CHD risk; however, this was attenuated by low-stress resilience, shown by interaction testing (p<0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Low-stress resilience in adolescence was associated with increased risk of CHD in middle age and may diminish the benefit of physical fitness. This represents new evidence of the role of stress resilience in determining risk of CHD and its interrelationship with physical fitness.

    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Epidemiology; Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43425 (URN)10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306703 (DOI)000351755300009 ()25740818 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84927665875 (ScopusID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

    Stiftelsen Olle Engqvist Byggmästare, Folksam

    Örebro University

    Available from: 2015-03-06 Created: 2015-03-06 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
    3. Determinants in adolescence of stroke-related hospital stay duration in men: a national cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants in adolescence of stroke-related hospital stay duration in men: a national cohort study
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    2016 (English)In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 47, no 9, 2416-2418 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Physical and psychological characteristics in adolescence are associated with subsequent stroke risk. Our aim is to investigate their relevance to length of hospital stay and risk of second stroke.

    Methods: Swedish men born between 1952 and 1956 (n=237 879) were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from population-based national registers. Stress resilience, body mass index, cognitive function, physical fitness, and blood pressure were measured at compulsory military conscription examinations in late adolescence. Joint Cox proportional hazards models estimated the associations of these characteristics with long compared with short duration of stroke-related hospital stay and with second stroke compared with first.

    Results: Some 3000 men were diagnosed with nonfatal stroke between ages 31 and 58 years. Low stress resilience, underweight, and higher systolic blood pressure (per 1-mm Hg increase) during adolescence were associated with longer hospital stay (compared with shorter) in ischemic stroke, with adjusted relative hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.46 (1.08-1.89), 1.41 (1.04-1.91), and 1.01 (1.00-1.02), respectively. Elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures during adolescence were associated with longer hospital stay in men with intracerebral hemorrhage: 1.01 (1.00-1.03) and 1.02 (1.00-1.04), respectively. Among both stroke types, obesity in adolescence conferred an increased risk of second stroke: 2.06 (1.21-3.45).

    Conclusions: Some characteristics relevant to length of stroke-related hospital stay and risk of second stroke are already present in adolescence. Early lifestyle influences are of importance not only to stroke risk by middle age but also to recurrence and use of healthcare resources among stroke survivors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Philadelphia, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
    Keyword
    Adolescent, blood pressure, length of stay, psychological stress, risk factors
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51591 (URN)10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.014265 (DOI)000383559300052 ()27491740 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84982813061 (ScopusID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    UK Economic and Social Research Council RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

    Stiftelsen Olle Engqvist Byggmästare

    Folksam

    Örebro University

    Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
    4. Severe infections and subsequent delayed cardiovascular disease: national cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Severe infections and subsequent delayed cardiovascular disease: national cohort study
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Family Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55808 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
  • Public defence: 2017-03-17 13:15 Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, Hörsal 2, Örebro
    Jenvén, Hélène
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Utsatta elevers maktlöshet: en studie om elevers sociala samvaro som förbättringsarbete i åk 8-92017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis is to examine how everyday social interactions and relations in a school class in years 8-9 are experienced by pupils and teachers and how they can be understood and improved. The research design is an action research approach and is carried out as a case study involving four teachers and 24 pupils. Four issues are formulated and the teachers and the researcher together suggest how certain problems might be solved, which in turn directs the action process over the period of three school terms. Analytical concepts are used to map and understand pupils’ everyday social relations in terms of peer groups, positions and norms. Eriksson’s (2001) sociological theory on bullying is used to analyze and explain the complexity of a case of bullying.

    Defined dominating norms that appear to guide the pupils’ social interactions are: (1) You should make room for yourself, be visible and heard, (2) you should have many friends and (3) you should look down on those who study. The everyday social relations are affected by the pupils’ positioning and by the groupings that are formed in the class. Crystalized groups that emerge in the study are: (1) those who make a lot of noise and take up a lot of room, (2) those who study, (3) pupils who are frequently absent, (4) those who feel uncomfortable and (5) those who are outside (a marginalized group). In addition to these findings, three dominating norms among the teachers emerge. These norms guide and affect how the teachers act and think when victimized pupils and their situations are discussed. Teachers’ dominating norms seem to prevail in situations where some pupils are victimized by other pupils in the class. This in turn could contribute to various kinds of moral disengagement on the part of the teachers when dealing with victimizing acts among pupils. From the perspective of the victimized pupils, such a way of acting could be understood as teachers, in their role as “security guarantors”, are unable to prevent the powerlessness of victimized pupils.

  • Public defence: 2017-03-24 13:15 Örebro universitet, Teknikhuset, Hörsal T, Örebro
    Albitar, Houssam
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Enabling a Robot for Underwater Surface Cleaning2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-03-28 13:00 Örebro universitet, rum P201, Örebro
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    Örebro University, Orebro University School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    On Emerging Mobile Learning Environments2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-03-31 09:00 Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, Hörsal 2, Örebro
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Disaster response for recovery: survivor´s experiences, health and the use of disaster radio to promote health after disasters2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-03-31 09:00 Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Örebro
    Rasmussen, Gunlög
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, molecular epidemiology and host immune response2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-03-31 13:15 Högskolan Dalarna, Fö6, Falun
    Erixon, Eva-Lena
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Matematiklärares kompetensutveckling online: policy, diskurs och meningsskapande2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-04-07 09:00 Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Örebro
    Olsson, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Promoting health in premature infants: with special focus on skin-to-skin contact and development of valid pain assesment2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-04-21 13:00 Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, Hörsal 2, Örebro
    Ewertsson, Mona
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lärande av praktiska färdigheter inom sjuksköterskeprofessionen: studier av lärande i olika arenor2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-05-19 09:00 Universitetssjukhuset, Wilandersalen, Örebro
    Sundqvist, Ann-Sofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Perioperative patient advocacy: having the patient's best interests at heart2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2017-05-26 09:00 Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Örebro
    Wickbom, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Epidemiological aspects of microscopic colitis2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)