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  • Pugh, Rhiannon
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Universities and economic development in lagging regions: ‘triple helix’ policy in Wales2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 982-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This paper considers the applicability and relevance of triple helix-based policy and theory, in the weaker region context of Wales,where the success of such approaches has been questionable. It calls for a broader appreciation of the roles ofuniversities in weaker regions beyond a narrow ‘third mission’ conceptualization, moving away from a normativeapplication of the triple helix in contexts very different from those in which it was originated. Instead, it supports thebroadening of the original theory beyond the three key actors of university, government and business, and anincreasing focus on diverse regional settings and spaces.

  • Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Project management ontology: the organizational learning perspective2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent interview with the Financial Times, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, Mr. Jeroen van der Veer, said he “keeps faith in ‘elephant’ projects” referring to the Russian gas mega-project that Shell had fallen eight months behind schedule with and had cost overruns twice the original estimate. Mr. van der Veer partially blamed industry-wide factors for this such as an increase in raw material prices, more expensive contractors and exchange rate pressure. But he also implied that the original assessment of the project in 2003 had been too optimistic and that the scope of the mega-project had to be revised. The wisdom he said was that scope changes are basically because you didn’t do enough homework in advance. Even though it is rather easy to feel miserable after such a statement, there is faith left as the chief executive says - if only we had been able to do our homework. This gives me reason enough to concentrate in this research on the construction of a proactive qualitative decision support aid for mega-project management. The main research topic of the dissertation is organizational learning in the field of project management (PM). This study explores project management by providing a PM ontology for managers. The managerial value of the ontology is, for example, lower potential for time and cost overruns and poor project quality, and higher potential for effective and efficient execution of complex projects. Project management essentially aims to combine learning and performance within the project organization to serve the project owners’ strategy. Therefore a proactive vision and co-evolutionary touch is needed to evolve project processes. Project management under high pressure often means utilizing explicit quantitative methods, usually based on reactive calculations. However, the management of uncertainties and risks demands a versatile, qualitative point of view. With quantitative methods we can “price” the risks. With qualitative methods we are able to realize and shape the risks in advance. Therefore project management is the challenge to move the organization towards the common qualitative and quantitative goals during a project lifecycle, i.e. to support organizational learning throughout a long-lasting project. This study introduces a project management ontology – a classification of management disciplines for project managers and a project learning model. Knowledge management theory, activity theory, systems theory and various management practices are discussed in the conceptual part of this thesis. The empirical part of the research concerns a multiple-case study conducted in ten project organizations participating in two large mega-projects. The mega-projects were in the offshore industry and shipbuilding industry. Altogether more than fifty project managers and project team members participated in this research. The empirical results are presented at the end of the introductory essay and in the original publications enclosed in this thesis. Appendixes available from: heli.aramo-immonen@tut.fi

  • St John, Oliver
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Practice and Presence: Bilingual interaction and identities in an 'international' school setting [LISA 21 and pilot study findings]2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced Study Colloquium Proposal Abstract

    LISA 21 and Pilot Study Findings

    Oliver St John has worked within the field of foreign language pedagogy both as a teacher and teacher educator in the UK and Sweden. He is currently starting his second year of a five-year PhD programme within the LISA 21 project at the Department of Education, Örebro University, Sweden.

    LISA 21 is a new project which focuses on plurilingualism, identities and learning in culturally-diverse secondary schools. Taking sociocultural, postcolonial and pragmatist theoretical frameworks as points of departure and seeking to build on classroom interaction studies, the project aims to maintain multiple perspectives on these issues and to create new analytical and empirical intersections.

    The first section of this paper sketches some of the theoretical perspectives guiding this project by seeking to clarify the way the terms ‘language’, ‘identities’ and ‘culture’ are understood. Language is a primary means of mediating human action, but is itself constantly being tailored to serve individual purposes. It is argued that identities need to be understood as both social positionings and as having some kind of cross-contextual coherence. Culture, it is suggested, needs to be conceived as both differentiated and dynamic. This section also highlights the way both languages and identities are implicated when individuals learn. Multiple perspectives on these issues and maintaining balance between micro and macro approaches are considered vital to a more penetrating analysis of these issues.

    The second section of this paper presents the preliminary findings of a pilot study undertaken in the spring of 2007. Ethnographic fieldwork was carried out in a school for the Deaf and Hearing-impaired and an ‘international’ school with a view to gaining orientation and finer focus on areas of potential significance within the project’s ‘language and identities’ research questions. Three educational tensions are outlined as a way of communicating some preliminary results: suspending and resourcing dialogue in the classroom; transferring versus transforming understanding and identity affordances and restraints in plurilingual learning environments. The first of these seeks to convey the way a teacher’s orchestration of student participation in the classroom has important repercussions for students’ learning opportunities and the generation of certain kinds of knowledge. The significant contribution of student contributions to understanding in the classroom was also noted. With regard to the second, teacher practices suggested a view of knowledge as ‘packing’ brains whereas students’ behaviour demonstrated that their needs would be better satisfied with a transforming rather than a transferring of understanding. Thirdly, observations pointed to the need for pedagogical sensitivity where both identity affordances and restraints on student learning are created in plurilingual settings.

    Finally, the capacity to be comfortable alongside cultural differences and to appreciate them is highlighted as a ‘core’ life skill – one which needs to be fostered in school settings. Teachers need much support for this task and intercultural competence must be focused on in teacher education programmes if sustained opportunities for this kind of learning are to be an ongoing part of classroom priorities and practice.

     

  • Sund, Louise
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Pashby, Karen
    School of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
    ‘Is It That We Do Not Want Them to Have Washing Machines?’: Ethical Global Issues Pedagogy in Swedish Classrooms2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3552, article id 3552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to sustainable development target 4.7, by 2030, all signatory nations must ensure learners are provided with education for sustainable development and global citizenship. While many national curricula provide a policy imperative to provide a global dimension in curriculum and teaching, mainstreaming an approach to teaching about sustainable development through pressing global issues requires strong attention to what happens between students and teachers in the classroom. In this article, we aim to help teachers think through an ongoing reflexive approach to teaching by bridging important theoretical and empirical scholarship with the day-to-day pedagogies of global educators. This collaborative praxis offers an actionable approach to engaging with values, conflicts and ethical consequences towards bringing global issues into teaching and learning in a critical and fruitful way. Our results show that teachers and students can both experience discomfort and experience a sense of significance and worthiness of engaging in a more critical approach. In addition, if we critically reflect and support students in doing so, as these teachers have done, we open up possibilities for approaches to global issues pedagogy that come much closer to addressing the pressing issues of our deeply unequal world.

  • Tronstad, Kristian
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, OsloMet- Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, Marit Owren
    Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, OsloMet- Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Bask, Miia
    NOVA, OsloMet- Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Accumulation of welfare problems among immigrants in Norway2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report analyses a large-scale survey of living conditions among immigrants in Norway. Data were collected by Statistics Norway in 2016 and covered 12 of the largest immigrant groups in Norway. This aim of the present report is analyse the kinds of welfare problems experienced by immigrants. Which immigrants accumulate most welfare problems? What are the main predictors of welfare problems among immigrants in Norway? How does the accumulation of welfare problems relate to general life satisfaction among immigrants? In addition, we compare the accumulation of welfare problems among immigrants with the total population.

    An early draft of this report was presented at the International Forum on Migration Statistics 2018, in Paris in January. A more recent draft was presented internally at a seminar for migration researchers at Oslo Metropolitan University. We would like to thank participants at both events for constructive and valuable feedback. This project was commissioned and financed by the Directorate of Integration and Diversity (IMDi). We would like to thank IMDi for making possible this interesting and challenging project, and especially Anja Wedde Sveen and Eivind Hageberg, both at IMDi, for cooperation underway. Project leader has been Kristian Rose Tronstad of the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, NIBR. Tronstad has conducted the statistical analyses and written most of the report. Marit Nygaard at NIBR has contributed on analysis and discussion of the results. Miia Bask at Norwegian Social Research, NOVA, has written about the theory of accumulation of welfare problems in Chapter 3.

  • Bask, Miia
    et al.
    Norwegian Social Research, Norway, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Ristikari, Tiina
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Hautakoski, Ari
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Gissler, Mika
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Psychiatric diagnoses as grounds for disability pension among former child welfare clients2017In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shahin Moghadam, Sarah
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Jyväskylä University, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mustafee, Navonil
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Clustering the imp thought: searching roots and diversities in imp research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMP research is often treated as an empirical perspective describing complexities of repeated business-to-business exchanges and their embeddedness. While building on some common understandings and concepts, this paper asks: How homogeneous is the IMP research? This paper uses cluster analysis to capture the roots and various sub-groups of IMP research as means to depict the question of homogeneity (i.e. a core focus in the research) or heterogeneity (i.e. using references from other fields or specific to sub-fields) of the IMP thought. In this scientific work in progress paper we introduce how we design to use bibliographical methods in order to harvest data from an extensive amount of IMP-related articles written from the 1970’s onwards. In this first attempt to reveal IMP we used overall 294 articles yielded to 10,615 co-citation relationships. A threshold of minimum number of citations of a cited reference was set to five (5) to capture such references that have been cited in multiple publications. We introduce visual mapping of defined subject area clusters and as an example we describe shortly clusters. Perhaps not surprisingly our findings suggest that IMP research is not so homogenous, with at least four clear clusters of IMP-research each utilizing different key references.

  • Bask, Miia
    Department of Sociology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A longitudinal approach to social exclusion in Sweden2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of four papers, and has as its central theme the accumulation of welfare problems and social exclusion. We use Swedish data and all analyses are based on individuals of working age. We perform longitudinal analyses to scrutinize the accumulation of disadvantages over the individual life courses as well as to detect the general trends in social exclusion occurrence in Swedish society during the past two decades.

    In Paper I, in an analysis of social exclusion among immigrants in Sweden, we find that immigrants suffer more often from social exclusion than native Swedes do. We also find that even if the accumulation of welfare problems is more common among immigrants than native Swedes, the connections between welfare disadvantages are stronger among Swedes. Furthermore, a logistic regression analysis revealed that time spent in Sweden decreases the risk of social exclusion among immigrants. However, even though we control for several demographic variables, human capital indicators and socio-economic class, the odds for social exclusion are still greater for immigrants than for native Swedes. Some form of discrimination can therefore not be excluded.

    Paper II is co-written with Björn Halleröd. This paper involves a longitudinal analysis of the accumulation of closely related welfare disadvantages, showing that the initial deprivation increases over time. Latent growth curve models reveal that a high initial deprivation is related to low socio-economic class and being single. It is also shown that a high initial deprivation decreases the probability of upward class-mobility as well as the probability of deprived singles becoming cohabiting. Moreover, a high initial deprivation increases the risk that couples will experience a household break-up.

    In Paper III, we perform a longitudinal analysis of social exclusion in Sweden during the period 1979-2003, in which several logistic regression models for panel data are fitted to our data. We find no support that immigrants have been better integrated into Swedish society over time from the perspective of social exclusion risk. Instead, there are weak signs that integration has become worse. We also find weak signs that the higher social exclusion risk that men have relative to women has decreased during the past two decades. Furthermore, comparing with couples without children, the odds for social exclusion among singles with children have increased and the odds for couples with children have decreased during the period 1979-2003.

    Paper IV utilizes latent class factor models to scrutinize the connections between welfare problems and a set of demographic variables, human capital indicators and socio-economic class. We find that welfare problems do cluster. Our results also support several of the findings in the previous paper. Family type, especially being single or living in a relationship, makes a clear difference in the propensity to accumulate welfare problems. Furthermore, immigrants characterize the factors with a high problem accumulation. Additionally, there is no general difference between the sexes in the problem accumulation itself, but experiences of threat or violence and having sleeping problems seem to be more often related to being a woman, whereas the lack of a close friend is most often related to being a man.

    To conclude, this thesis reveals several interesting facts concerning the accumulation of welfare problems and social exclusion in Sweden. Considering the implications for policy, the situations of immigrants and single parents need to be underlined. That is, the integration of immigrants should be given more emphasis and measures should be taken to support single parents as well as to promote a discussion on how to make relationships last.

    List of papers
    1. Welfare problems and social exclusion among immigrants in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Welfare problems and social exclusion among immigrants in Sweden
    2005 (English)In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine social exclusion among immigrants in Sweden. The groups under scrutiny are native Swedes, first generation Swedes, naturalized Swedes, Nordic citizens and non-Nordic citizens. Specifically, because one goal of the welfare state is to break the connections between different welfare problems, we investigate the associations between welfare problems among different immigrant groups as well as among native Swedes. We find that the accumulation of welfare problems is higher among immigrant groups, but that the correlations between welfare problems are strongest among Swedes. Finally, we analyse social exclusion among immigrants using a logistic regression analysis. Because a regression analysis with explanatory variables such as demographic variables, human capital indicators and socioeconomic class cannot explain the difference between immigrants and native Swedes, it appears that discrimination is a probable explanation.

     

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69033 (URN)10.1093/esr/jci005 (DOI)000228080900005 ()2-s2.0-24144464018 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Accumulation of Welfare Problems in a Longitudinal Perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accumulation of Welfare Problems in a Longitudinal Perspective
    2008 (English)In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 311-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The central aim of the present paper is to analyse the degree to which welfare problems accumulate over time and to what extent such an accumulation is related to class position and household formation. We utilize longitudinal data from the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions, following a panel that was first interviewed in 1979 and, thereafter, re-interviewed three times (1986–87, 1994–95 and 2002–03). We use structural equation modelling to extract latent deprivation indexes based on seven manifest indicators. Thereafter, the indexes are used as input values in a latent growth curve (LGC) model when estimating an intercept variable and a slope variable. We finally estimate two structural models. In the first model, the relation over time between class position, class mobility and deprivation are estimated, and the second model deals with the relationship between household types, change of household type and deprivation. Several interesting results can be reported. We find a strong relationship between the deprivation indexes over time. The LGC model can also confirm a positive relationship between deprivation intercept and deprivation slope. That is, individuals who score high on the deprivation index from the beginning are increasingly prone to accumulate additional welfare problems over time. The analysis also reveals a clear class gradient as well as effects of class mobility. In addition, it is shown that deprivation affects class mobility, meaning that we can confirm selection effects. Also household constellation and changes of household type are closely connected to deprivation and changes in deprivation over time. The analysis reveals selection effects even in this case.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2008
    Keywords
    Living conditions, Social exclusion, Longitudinal, Deprivation, Structural equation modelling, Latent growth curve modelling, Accumulation of welfare problems, Health, Income, Unemployment
    National Category
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69043 (URN)10.1007/s11205-007-9192-5 (DOI)000257957800006 ()
    Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Social Exclusion Occurrence in Sweden during 1979-2003: The Significance of Sex, Family Type and Nationality Background
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Exclusion Occurrence in Sweden during 1979-2003: The Significance of Sex, Family Type and Nationality Background
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69028 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Cumulative Disadvantage and Connections between Welfare Problems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative Disadvantage and Connections between Welfare Problems
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69021 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
  • Zekavat, Amir Reza
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Jansson, Anton
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Larsson, Joakim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pejryd, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Investigating the effect of fabrication temperature on mechanical properties of fused deposition modelling parts using X-ray computed tomography2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is one of the most common additive manufacturing (AM) techniques for fabricating prototypes as well as functional parts. In this technique, several parameters may influence the part quality and consequently mechanical properties of fabricated components. In this paper, an experimental investigation on effects of fabrication temperature as one of the influential parameters on mechanical properties of manufactured parts is presented. A series of specimens fabricated at temperatures ranging from 180 to 260 C were used for this investigation. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used in order to non-destructively analyze the internal geometry of the specimens especially the bond between extruded filaments. Finally, the specimens were subjected to a uniaxial tensile load for evaluation of mechanical properties. The results showed that the specimens fabricated at lower temperatures have relatively lower tensile strength despite their considerably higher strain at break. In addition, the specimens fabricated at higher temperature range had significantly higher tensile strength because of the better bond between extruded filaments. The different mechanical responses were highly related to the internal geometry of the specimens and not necessarily the porosity. CT showed great potential as a non-destructive tool for investigation and development of FDM process.

  • Quennerstedt, Ann
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Robinson, Carol
    School of Education, University of Brighton, Brighton, England.
    I'Anson, John
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    The UNCRC: The Voice of Global Consensus on Children's Rights?2018In: Nordic Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1891-8131, E-ISSN 1891-814X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 38-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) encompasses contradictions is known. Despite this knowledge, attention to conflicting aspects within the convention is limited, and instead, the assumption that the convention represents an international consensus on the meaning of children's human rights seems to be widespread in policy and academic work. Furthermore, the available literature within the field of children's rights is largely silent regarding precise and elaborated knowledge about the inherent contradictions within the UNCRC. This paper expands upon and specifies the knowledge about consensus and inconsistencies within the convention. Through an in-depth study of the drafting process of the UNCRC, the paper identifies and displays both contradictions within the convention, and ways in which the text of the convention can be seen to express consensus. The analysis shows how a certain consensus was produced for respectively civil and political rights, and socio-economic rights, but that different and inconsistent children's rights logics underlay the formation of these respective consensus-formations.

  • Knezevic, David
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Kommuninvest, Örebro, Sweden.
    Intertemporal diversification of sub-sovereign debt2018In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a comprehensive empirical analysis of the debt maturity structure of the Swedish municipal sector. The Swedish municipal debt portfolio is characterized by a short maturity structure and an asset-liability mismatch that poses potentially severe roll-over risk. The 2008–2009 financial crisis manifested as a liquidity shock to the sector that highlighted the dangers of short-term funding strategies in conjunction with low levels of intertemporal diversification. In this study we analyze to what extent this led to a change of intertemporal diversification. Based on a unique contract-level monthly data set of municipal loans issued by Kommuninvest of Sweden from January 1997 to June 2016, we construct and estimate a range of dispersion and moment measures to capture the change of various distributional characteristics of the maturity structure. These measures are used as dependent variables in fixed-effects models together with a number of control variables to estimate the effect of the debt-crisis liquidity shock. The main finding is that the crisis did affect the diversification, but not in a persistent way. A possible explanation is that the municipalities found that Kommuninvest through jointly guaranteed lending was able to function as a lender of last resort and thereby mitigates the roll-over risk. It is also found that fiscal and financial properties such as debt-to-tax base ratio, tax base volatility and per capita income are associated with the characteristics of the debt maturity structure of Swedish municipalities, as well as macroeconomic factors such as the term structure of interest rates.

  • Bask, Miia
    et al.
    Norwegian Social Research (NOVA), Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Bask, Mikael
    Department of Economics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cumulative (Dis)Advantage and the Matthew Effect in Life-Course Analysis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0142447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To foster a deeper understanding of the mechanisms behind inequality in society, it is crucial to work with well-defined concepts associated with such mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to define cumulative (dis) advantage and the Matthew effect. We argue that cumulative (dis) advantage is an intra-individual micro-level phenomenon, that the Matthew effect is an inter-individual macro-level phenomenon and that an appropriate measure of the Matthew effect focuses on the mechanism or dynamic process that generates inequality. The Matthew mechanism is, therefore, a better name for the phenomenon, where we provide a novel measure of the mechanism, including a proof-of-principle analysis using disposable personal income data. Finally, because socio-economic theory should be able to explain cumulative (dis) advantage and the Matthew mechanism when they are detected in data, we discuss the types of models that may explain the phenomena. We argue that interactions-based models in the literature traditions of analytical sociology and statistical mechanics serve this purpose.

  • Bask, Miia
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bask, Mikael
    Department of Economics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Social Influence and the Matthew Mechanism: The Case of an Artificial Cultural Market2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that the Matthew effect, or Matthew mechanism, was present in the artificial cultural market Music Lab when social influence between individuals was allowed, whereas this was not the case when social influence was not allowed. We also sketch on a class of social network models, derived from social influence theory, that may gener-ate the Matthew effect. Thus, we propose a theoretical framework that may explain why the most popular songs were much more popular, and the least popular songs were much less popular, than when disallowing social influence between individuals.

  • Bask, Miia
    et al.
    Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Bask, Mikael
    Department of Economics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Inequality Generating Processes and Measurement of the Matthew Effect2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The first aim of this paper is to clarify the differences and relationships between cumulative advantage/disadvantage and the Matthew effect. Its second aim, which is also its main contribution, is not only to present a new measure of the Matthew effect, but also to show how to estimate this effect from data and how to make statistical inference. We argue that one should utilize the positivity of the natural logarithm of the largest generalized eigenvalue for a non-linear dynamic process as evidence when claiming that the Matthew effect is present in the dynamic process that generates individuals’ socio-economic life-courses. Thus, our measure of the Matthew effect focuses on the dynamic process that generates socio-economic inequality and not on the outcome of this process.

  • Cicognani, Elvira
    et al.
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Albanesi, Cinzia
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Mazzoni, Davide
    University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Modelling and testing the processes of construction of youth active EU citizenship in school: Recommendations from the CATCHEyoU intervention2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the intervention was to stimulate young people’s interest and engagement in European affairs in schools. The core pedagogical idea was to build with schools an opportunity to involve students in a participatory action research (PAR), on social issues that young people identify as relevant and would be willing to address.

  • Nyström Höög, Catharina
    et al.
    Department of Scandinavian Languages, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björkvall, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Keeping the Discussion Among Civil Servants Alive: ‘Platform of Values’ as an Emerging Genre Within the Public Sector in Sweden.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 17-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A defining feature of contemporary public authorities in Scandinavia end elsewhere is the production of texts labelled platform of values or core values. Previous research has pointed to at least three factors contributing to this development: an increased interest in the ethics in the public sector, new forms of management and control, and the importance of the external promotion of public authorities. This paper presents an analysis of how different groups of civil servants in Sweden perceive and use "platform of values" texts as part of their professional practices. The paper draws on two types of data - a focus group with senior HR officers and a quantitative survey to civil servants. Critical Genre Analysis is presented as a methodological framework for understanding "value texts" as social actions. The results show that platform of values practices are connected to the creation of the "ethically aware" public servant; that neither their connection to control over civil servants nor to the external promotion of the authority are directly recognised, whereas their connection to goal achievement is; and that the role of the "value texts" as such has been somewhat overrated in previous research - it is the dialogue about the values that matters.

  • Harrison, Glenn W.
    et al.
    Department of Risk Management & Insurance and Center for the Economic Analysis of Risk, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Lau, Morten I.
    Durham University Business School, Durham University, Durham, UK.
    Rutström, Elisabet
    Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Identifying Time Preferences With Experiments: Comment2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying time preferences with laboratory experiments demands attention to theoretical, experimental and econometrics issues. Andreoni and Sprenger [2012a] propose a single choice task and several econometric methods that seek to address these issues. The choice task requires subjects to make portfolio allocations between sooner and later payments of money. All theories they examine imply that subjects pick one boundary or the other, or that they pick strictly interior allocations. Their econometric methods seek to explain the average portfolio choice, but ignore the bald fact that 70% of the responses by the subjects were choices at one boundary allocation or the other. The average portfolio choice implied by the modes at either boundary is chosen by virtually none of their subjects. Their ad hoc econometric attempts to model the truncation of choices at the boundaries fail to account for the economics of the observed behavior. A systematic analysis of their data generates a priori implausible estimates of significantly convex utility functions. Andreoni and Sprenger [2012b] inherits all of the problems of the basic design and econometrics from Andreoni and Sprenger [2012a], and adds one: their findings are immediately confounded by non-additivity of the intertemporal utility function. Apart from this theoretical confound, there is experimental evidence of just this type of non-additivity, leading to an aversion to correlated payoffs over time. The evidence in favor of correlation aversion predicts the qualitative pattern they observe perfectly, without claiming that the utility function for stochastic outcomes is somehow different from the utility function for non-stochastic outcomes.

  • George, J. Greg
    et al.
    School of Business and the Center for Economic Analysis, Middle Georgia State College, Macon, GA, USA.
    Harisson, Glenn W.
    Department of Risk Management & Insurance, Robinson College of Business and Center for the Economic Analysis of Risk, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Rutström, Elisabet
    Dean’s Behavioral Economics Lab, Robinson College of Business and Department of Economics, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Behavioral Responses towards Risk Mitigation: An Experiment with Wild Fire Risks2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the behavioral effects of voluntary self-protection in situations where the probabilities are unknown to the agent? Virtually all naturally occurring environments of risk management involve subjective probabilities, and many allow decision makers to voluntarily mitigate risk using self-protection activities. To examine this environment we design a laboratory experiment in which incomplete information about probabilities is generated in a naturalistic way from the perspective of decision makers, but where the experimenter has complete information. Specifically, we use virtual simulations of property that is at risk of destruction from simulated wild fires. Using direct belief elicitation mechanisms we find that subjective beliefs over high and low risk scenarios underestimate the shift. Thus, predictions of voluntary self-protection activities based on such data would estimate a suboptimal willingness to invest. However, when offering subjects’ self-protection opportunities, their choices indicate that they over-estimate the risk reducing effects and would in fact be willing to pay more than if they knew the objective probabilities. These findings have direct implications for the normative evaluation of risk management policies when risk perception is subjective.

  • Harrison, Glenn W.
    et al.
    Department of Risk Management & Insurance and Center for the Economic Analysis of Risk, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Johnson, Jared M.
    Google, USA .
    Rutström, Elisabet
    Dean’s Behavioral Economics Lab, Robinson College of Business and Department of Economics, Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA .
    Risk Perceptions in the Virtual Wilderness2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In economic decision making most probabilities are formed in a compound manner through the interaction of multiple attributes of events, each of which have likelihoods that are unknown to various degrees. We consider how subjectively formed risk perceptions are affected by the dispersion of the underlying objective, compound probability distribution. Our methodology relies on virtual reality simulations of physical cues of the risk, allowing us to bring together the natural stimuli of the field and the control of the lab. Our application is an important example of a risk with serious economic consequences: the management of wild fire risk. This is an important natural setting where the risk is compound, depending on many random physical processes and where the formation of risk perceptions necessary for risk management is therefore complex. We find that increasing the dispersion of the underlying objective risk leads to higher subjective probabilities of the worst outcome occurring, consistent with increased pessimism. We compare the risk perceptions of experts in this domain with non-expert residents that are affected by the risk, and conclude that experts are not always better than non-experts at estimating the risks. Experts appear to be locked in by their strong priors based on stimuli outside those presented in our naturalistic virtual reality. With a global environment that produces increasingly extreme phenomena, training experts to be less anchored on their prior experiences will become important.

  • Dixit, Vinayak V.
    et al.
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
    Harb, Rami C.
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA.
    Harrison, Glenn W.
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Marco, Donald M.
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA.
    Mard, M. Seph
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Radwan, A. Essam
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA.
    Rutström, Elisabet
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Schneider, Mark P.
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Review of Congestion Pricing Experiences2010Report (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2018-10-26 13:15 Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, Hörsal P1, Örebro
    Adenskog, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Democratic innovations in political systems: towards a systemic approach2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many indicators that the representative democratic system is currently facing serious legitimacy challenges. Two central indicators of these challenges are changing patterns of political participation and a decline in system support. Against this backdrop, a growing number of governments claim that democratic innovations (DIs) could reconnect institutions with citizens. This thesis focuses on online DIs implemented in real political contexts, and the overarching aim of the thesis is to contribute to the emergent empirical scholarship on how DIs can influence political systems. In the last two decades, most empirical studies in the field have analysed DIs at the micro level.

    This thesis takes a different stance by posing system-related research questions to the implementation of DIs and, by doing so, showing how DIs are interrelated with, rather than isolated from, the political system and that DIs can influence political systems. The thesis consists of one literature review and three empirical case studies, applying a multiple methodological approach. Its novelty lies in three main empirical findings that contribute to the development of the field. First, it shows that participation in DIs can influence citizens’ perceived trust towards local political institutions. In addition, the results suggest that predispositions and prior engagement mediate the direction of change in trust amongst citizens. Secondly, the results show that DIs can perform different political functions, such as facilitating spaces for citizens to provide original ideas and deliberation, while also having an agenda-setting function. Thirdly, the result suggest that long-term institutional change is complex and that the implementation of DIs can create a situation in which civil servants and politicians perceive their organisation to be in some ‘state of flux’, as they are torn between two competing institutional logics. In conclusion, this thesis should be understood as a piece in a broader movement that works towards a systemic approach to the study of DIs, and that by showing these empirical findings, the thesis contributes to deepening our understanding of what influences and functions DIs can have in political systems.

    List of papers
    1. The Challenges for Online Deliberation Research: A Literature Review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Challenges for Online Deliberation Research: A Literature Review
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of E-Politics, ISSN 1947-9131, E-ISSN 1947-914X, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    While pure deliberation has still not been found online, the field of online deliberation research is blossoming. Born out of the “frustrations and possibilities” of the 1990s, a current theme in the field is to re-link deliberative theory with empirical political science. The aim of this systematic literature review is to sort out and examine important features of this development; to identify and categorise important research themes and issues as well as to pinpoint some research gaps. Using citation analysis as a method for article selection, 788 abstracts were retrieved and out of these, 130 items were chosen for further analysis. First the review shows that researchers from several different disciplines are involved in the field and that these researchers are studying online deliberation in a variety of arenas aided by a wide range of methods. Second the review reveals that the field struggles with a highly diversified concept of deliberation; that newer theoretical developments are underutilised in the operationalisation of theoretical concepts for empirical analyses, and that it there is a rather low degree of cumulativity in the field. Finally, more attention is paid on deliberation per se, rather than the political and democratic consequences of deliberation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IGI Global, 2014
    Keywords
    Deliberation, internet, deliberative democracy, literature review, online deliberation
    National Category
    Political Science
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32418 (URN)10.4018/ijep.2014010101 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-11-15 Created: 2013-11-15 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Democratic Innovations in Deliberative Systems: the Case of the Estonian Citizens’ Assembly Process
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic Innovations in Deliberative Systems: the Case of the Estonian Citizens’ Assembly Process
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Public Deliberation, ISSN 1937-2841, E-ISSN 1937-2841, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    With the proliferation and application of democratic innovations around the world, the empirical study of deliberative and participatory processes has shifted from small-scale environments and experiments to real-life political processes on a large scale. With this shift, there is also a need to explore new theoretical approaches in order to understand current developments. Instead of analyzing democratic innovations in isolation, the recent ‘systemic turn’ in the field encourages us to broaden our perspective and evaluate democratic innovations as complementary parts of a political system.

    This paper will draw upon a qualitative case study, based on interview and supported by survey data, of the ‘Estonian Citizens’ Assembly Process’ (ECA), in order to operationalize the systemic approach to deliberative democracy and illustrate how this can be applied to an analysis of democratic innovations.

    The ECA spanned more than a year (November 2012 to April 2014) and covered three political arenas: the public sphere, democratic innovations and representative institutions. The systemic analysis highlights the deliberative strengths and weaknesses of arenas and institutions, and illuminates how various arenas and democratic innovations did and did not complement one another in the creation of a deliberative process. The systemic analysis offers two possible interpretations of the ECA. The more affirmative interpretation is it constituted a deliberative system, as it did perform the three main functions fulfilled by different arenas and institutions. The more critical interpretation is that the ECA partly failed to be a deliberative system, due to social domination and decoupling of institutions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Association for Public Participation, 2015
    Keywords
    Democratic innovations, deliberative systems, crowdsourcing, ICTs, deliberative democracy
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39681 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-12-15 Created: 2014-12-15 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
    3. Democratic Innovations: Reinforcing or changing perceptions of trust?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic Innovations: Reinforcing or changing perceptions of trust?
    2017 (English)In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 575-587Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Declining trust in representative institutions is considered one of the most significant political problems of our time. It is often suggested that democratic innovations—or mechanisms which aim to increase and deepen citizen participation in the political decision-making process—can help reverse this trend. However, empirical research about actual effects of participation on trust is scarce, and weakened by causality problems. With survey data representing 1,470 participants in a landmark Swedish e-petition system, the article shows that both generalized attitudes and process evaluations matter in how trust is affected by democratic innovations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2017
    Keywords
    Citizen participation; democratic innovations; e-petitions; public trust
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48957 (URN)10.1080/01900692.2016.1162801 (DOI)000415699700004 ()2-s2.0-84978523941 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    Building pervasive participation
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas
    Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
    4. After the Equilibrium: Democratic Innovations and Long-term Institutional Development in the City of Reykjavik
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>After the Equilibrium: Democratic Innovations and Long-term Institutional Development in the City of Reykjavik
    2018 (English)In: Analyse & Kritik. Zeitung für linke Debatte und Praxis, ISSN 0171-5860, E-ISSN 2365-9858, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Although democratic innovations (DIs) are spread all over the world, there is little research on the institutional outcomes of implementing such innovations in governmental organisations. To remedy this, it is important to focus on cases where DIs have been implemented and formally connected to the policymaking process over a longer period. Reykjavik provides such a case. Drawing on observations and interviews with key stakeholders over a period of three years, this study analyses how the institutional logic of DIs influenced the local government in Reykjavik. The study presents two conclusions: First, it is clear that one equilibrium (representative democracy) has not been replaced by another (participatory democracy). Second, there is no peaceful co-existence between the two, but instead the outcome is an organisation in ‘a state of flux’. There are several factors contributing to this outcome, but three stand out: a populist power-shift, dissatisfaction with theworking of the implemented DIs and deliberative ambiguity. In the final part of the article, the institutional outcome is discussed in relation to overall consequences for the political system.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lucius und Lucius Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
    Keywords
    Democratic innovations, ICT, local government, institutional logics
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69066 (URN)10.1515/auk-2018-0002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048634224 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
  • Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Enhancing Social Human-Robot Interaction with Deep Reinforcement Learning.2018In: Proc. FAIM/ISCA Workshop on Artificial Intelligence for Multimodal Human Robot Interaction, 2018, MHRI , 2018, p. 48-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to develop an autonomous social robot for elderly individuals. The robot will learn from the interaction and change its behaviors in order to enhance the interaction and improve the user experience. For this purpose, we aim to use Deep Reinforcement Learning. The robot will observe the user’s verbal and nonverbal social cues by using its camera and microphone, the reward will be positive valence and engagement of the user.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-26 10:00 Örebro universitet, Långhuset, Hörsal L2, Örebro
    Lagin, Madelen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The Price We Pay: The Autonomy of Store Managers in Making Price Decisions: The Case of Grocery Retailing2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation, the store manager’s autonomy in making price decisions is explored to further our understanding of this actor. As a result, the store manager’s embeddedness in the manufacturer-retailer-consumer triad provides a more holistic view of the price decisions made in grocery retailing. In both the scientific literature and the grey literature, discussions of whom it is who actually makes the price decisions within grocery retailing are diverse and point to all three actors in the triad, including the store manager.

    Through a theoretical departure in which price decisions and autonomy is discussed, it is possible to explore the store manager’s ability to make price decisions in relation to the manufacturer-retailer-consumer triad. As an embedded actor in the triad, the store managers can, theoretically andspeculatively, face restrictions in relation to all actors.

    The context in which this dissertation is placed is that of the grocery retail branch in Sweden, where the three largest retail organisations have participated in the dissertation. This dissertation consists of the cover paper and five appended papers, where autonomy is discussed from a qualitative perspective within the frame of a mixed method approach. By looking at price decisions from the store manager’s perspective, and his/her freedom in making price decisions, the dissertation contributes to the area of micro-foundations of pricing.

    It is concluded that while store managers might not be formally autonomous in making price decisions, and that connected restrictions, due to the relationship and position of the actors in the original triad are in place, the store managers have enough freedom in relation to the store to implicitly and operationally influence price decisions. As a result, it is concluded that the possibility to resist decisions by acting as if they are autonomous, store managers become important actors to be taken into account when price decisions are made and evaluated.

    List of papers
    1. Understanding the link between price strategy and price tactic – an analytical model on retailers’ decisions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the link between price strategy and price tactic – an analytical model on retailers’ decisions
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69157 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
    2. How does the use of in-store discount coupons affect retail revenues?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does the use of in-store discount coupons affect retail revenues?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69158 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Quantity Rebates Using Coupons – A Retailers Perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantity Rebates Using Coupons – A Retailers Perspective
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69159 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
    4. Psychological price-setting techniques - An experiment on odd to even prices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological price-setting techniques - An experiment on odd to even prices
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69160 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
    5. Retail price decisions from the perspective of the store manager
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retail price decisions from the perspective of the store manager
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69161 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
  • Hellberg, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Islam, Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Säkerhet vid molnlösningar2018Report (Other academic)
  • Kullenberg, Christopher
    et al.
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rohden, Frauke
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björkvall, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Brounéus, Fredrik
    VA (Public & Science), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Avellan-Hultman, Anders
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Järlehed, Johan
    Department of Languages and Literatures, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Van Meerbergen, Sara
    Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch and German, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nord, Andreas
    Department of Swedish, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lykke Nielsen, Helle
    Department of Languages and Literatures, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of History, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Rosendal, Tove
    Department of Languages and Literatures, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tomasson, Lotta
    VA (Public & Science), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westberg, Gustav
    Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What are analog bulletin boards used for today?: Analysing media uses, intermediality and technology affordances in Swedish bulletin board messages using a citizen science approach2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0202077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analog bulletin boards are omnipresent in Swedish urban areas, yet little systematic knowledge about this communication medium exists. In the shadow of the rapid emergence of digital media the analog bulletin board has received less attention than its digital successors, many of them having incorporated similar functionality with novel technical solutions. In this study we used a citizen science method to collect 1167 messages from bulletin boards around Sweden aided by school children and teachers, with the purpose of shedding new light on what is communicated on the boards, by whom, using what types of technologies and in what way the messages refer to other media. Results show that the most common messages are invitations to events, such as concerts, lectures and sports events, followed by buy-and-sell ads for goods and services. The most frequent sender is an association, for example NGOs, sports associations or religious communities. Almost half of the sampled messages were professionally printed, about forty per cent were made by home printers. Only six per cent of the messages were handwritten, almost exclusively by private persons as senders. Moreover, we show how the analog bulletin board has adapted to recent changes in media technology—a media landscape which is saturated with electronic- and mobile media. Further, the bulletin board still holds a firm place in a media ecology where local communication is in demand, and exists in parallel with electronic media. Close to forty percent of the messages contained hyperlinks to web pages and we found (and removed for anonymization purposes) more than six hundred phone numbers from the dataset.

  • Arensmeier, Cecilia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Different Expectations in Civic Education: A Comparison of Upper-Secondary School Textbooks in Sweden2018In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 5-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the article is to examine civic education in Sweden with regard to equality, by comparing curricula and textbooks for social studies in different tracks in upper-secondary school.

    Method: The study is based on qualitative text analysis, with quantitative features. The analysis maps themes covered, the extent and depth of thematic coverage, and amount of emphasis on conceptual understanding and analytical training.

    Findings: The results point to some similarities between the tracks; limited attention is given to democratic values and civic engagement, apart from voting. Clear differences are found in amount of information and complexity. The most basic textbooks target the vocational track, while (some of) the textbooks for the academic track have an elaborated focus on complex conceptual understanding and analytical training.

    Practical implications: The findings indicate different expectations in civic education. Vocational students receive more limited opportunities to develop civic abilities, which might negatively affect the exercise of citizenship and increase political inequality.

  • Tolgfors, Björn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Transformative assessment in the subject of physical education.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • Ziegler, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Quantitative detection of bacterial DNA in whole blood in bloodstream infection2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to increase the knowledge on how quantitative PCR can be used in the diagnostics of bloodstream infections, with an emphasis on quantitative elements.

    In Papers I and II, we evaluated quantitative data from two commercial PCR tests for pathogen detection directly in blood, Magicplex Sepsis (I) and SeptiFast (II), from patients with suspected sepsis. We found that high quantification cycle (Cq) values, indicating low DNA loads, were associated with findings of pathogens with doubtful clinical relevance, whereas low Cq values, indicating high DNA loads, were correlated with sepsis and septic shock, as well as with positive blood culture results.

    In Paper III, we aimed to study the bacterial DNA load during Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, in relation to different clinical factors. For this purpose, we developed a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for precise DNA quantification, targeting S. aureus specifically. We found that a high initial S. aureus DNA load was associated with laboratory markers for immune dysregulation as well as with sepsis, endocarditis, and mortality.

    In Paper IV, we aimed to develop a tool for repeated DNA quantification during bloodstream infection. For this purpose, we optimized a ddPCR, targeting the universal bacterial 16S rDNA, and performed a comparison with species-specific ddPCRs on spiked blood, and on clinical samples. The performance of the16S rDNA ddPCR was adequate, and we found that a high 16S rDNA load was associated with sepsis and mortality.

    In conclusion, our results indicate that the pathogen DNA load in blood plays an important role in the clinical picture in BSI. In future research on molecular BSI diagnostics, studies on DNA loads and clearance should be included.

    List of papers
    1. Evaluation of a Commercial Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Pathogen DNA in Blood from Patients with Suspected Sepsis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Commercial Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Pathogen DNA in Blood from Patients with Suspected Sepsis
    2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0167883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Magicplex Sepsis Real-time Test (MST) is a commercial multiplex PCR that can detect more than 90 different pathogens in blood, with an analysis time of six hours. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this method for the detection of bloodstream infection (BSI). An EDTA whole blood sample for MST was collected together with blood cultures (BC) from patients with suspected sepsis at the Emergency Department of a university hospital. Among 696 study patients, 322 (46%) patients were positive with at least one method; 128 (18%) were BC positive and 268 (38%) were MST positive. Considering BC to be the gold standard, MST had an overall sensitivity of 47%, specificity of 66%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 23%, and a negative predictive value of 87%. Among the MST positive samples with a negative BC, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and species that rarely cause community-acquired BSI were frequently noted. However, the quantification cycle (Cq) values of the MST+/BC- results were often high. We thus hypothesized that the performance of the MST test could be improved if the Cq cut-off level was adjusted downwards. With a lower Cq cut-off value, i.e. 6.0 for Staphylococcus species and 9.0 for all other species, the number of MST positive cases decreased to 83 (12%) and the overall sensitivity decreased to 38%. However, the PPV increased to 59% and the specificity increased to 96%, as many MST positive results for CoNS and bacteria that rarely cause community-acquired BSI turned MST negative. In conclusion, our study shows that with a lower Cq cut-off value, the MST will detect less contaminants and findings with unclear relevance, but to the cost of a lower sensitivity. Consequently, we consider that a positive MST results with a Cq value above the adjusted cut-off should be interpreted with caution, as the result might be clinically irrelevant. In a correspondent way, quantitative results could probably be useful in the interpretation of positive results from other molecular assays for the detection of BSI.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, USA: Public Library of Science, 2016
    National Category
    Clinical Laboratory Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54404 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0167883 (DOI)000392842900017 ()27997618 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006866953 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Resaerch committee of Region Örebro Län

    Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Quantitative data from the SeptiFast real-time PCR is associated with disease severity in patients with sepsis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative data from the SeptiFast real-time PCR is associated with disease severity in patients with sepsis
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The commercial test, SeptiFast, is designed to detect DNA from bacterial and fungal pathogens in whole blood. The method has been found to be specific with a high rule-in value for the early detection of septic patients. The software automatically provides information about the identified pathogen, without quantification of the pathogen. However, it is possible to manually derive Crossing point (Cp) values, i.e. the PCR cycle at which DNA is significantly amplified. The aim of this study was to find out whether Cp values correlate to disease severity.

    Methods: We used a study cohort of patients with positive results from SeptiFast tests for bacteria from a recent study which included patients with suspected sepsis in the Emergency department. Cp values were compared with disease severity, classified as severe sepsis/septic shock or non-severe sepsis, according to the criteria of the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    Results: Ninety-four patients were included. The prevalence of severe sepsis/septic shock in the study was 29%. SeptiFast positive tests from patients with severe sepsis/septic shock had significantly lower Cp values compared with those from patients with non-severe sepsis, median 16.9 (range: 7.3 - 24.3) versus 20.9 (range: 8.5 - 25.0), p < 0.001. Positive predictive values from the SeptiFast test for identifying severe sepsis/septic shock were 34% at Cp cut-off <25.0, 35% at Cp cut-off <22.5, 50% at Cp cut-off <20.0, and 73% at Cp cut-off <17.5. Patients with a positive Septifast test with a Cp value <17.5 had significantly more severe sepsis/septic shock (73% versus 15%, p < 0.001), were more often admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (23% versus 4%, p = 0.016), had positive blood culture (BC) more frequently (100% versus 32%, p < 0.001) and had longer hospital stays (median 19.5 [range: 4 - 78] days versus 5 [range: 0 - 75] days, p < 0.001) compared with those with a Cp value >17.5.

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that introducing quantitative data to the SeptiFast test could be of value in assessing sepsis severity. Moreover, such data might also be useful in predicting a positive BC result.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: BioMed Central, 2014
    Keywords
    Polymerase-chain-reaction, blood-stream infections, staphylococcus-aureus bacteremia, genomic bacterial load, rapid detection, united-states, pathogens, diagnosis, culture, epidemiology
    National Category
    Infectious Medicine
    Research subject
    Infectious Diseases
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34951 (URN)10.1186/1471-2334-14-155 (DOI)000333601600004 ()24656148 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84899124239 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Research Committee of the Örebro County Council

    Available from: 2014-05-05 Created: 2014-05-05 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
    3. nuc DNA in Whole blood in Relation to Immune dysregulation, Sepsis, and Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>nuc DNA in Whole blood in Relation to Immune dysregulation, Sepsis, and Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    General Practice
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68880 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
    4. 16S rDNA droplet digital PCR for monitoring bacterial DNAemia in bloodstream infections
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>16S rDNA droplet digital PCR for monitoring bacterial DNAemia in bloodstream infections
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    General Practice
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68881 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
  • Bajramović, Sanela
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hierarchical Sisterhood: Supporting Women's Peacebuilding through Swedish Aid to Bosnia and Herzegovina 1993-20132018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines possibilities and challenges faced by international interveners in a post-socialist and violently divided area. The study object is the Swedish foundation Kvinna till Kvinna, formed in 1993 during the Bosnian war, originating from the peace movement and supported by the Swedish government aid agency Sida. The aim is to contextualize and analyze Kvinna till Kvinna’s two decades of engagement in peacebuilding in Bosnia. The encounter with domestic women’s NGOs is of particular interest. By focusing on rhetoric, practice and silences, the ambition has been to understand the international/local relationship from the perspective of both actors.

      In terms of methodology, this study combines a hermeneutic approach with that of oral history. The empirical material utilized consists of both written and oral sources, the majority of which appear in research for the first time. To capture the complexity of the peacebuilding endeavor, critically scrutinize it and discern its benevolence, this research draws inspiration from postcolonial and semiperipherality theories, as well as influential theorizing on peacebuilding, sisterhood and solidarity.

      This study shows that even well-intentioned, locally-focused external efforts, constrained by donor agendas and circumstances on the ground, contain problematic characteristics common in the era of liberal peace. While subscribing to the idea of transnational sisterhood, Kvinna till Kvinna also presented a belief in Swedish supremacy and demonstrated a lack of interest in local knowledge. It sought to educate and change its Bosnian counterparts by using soft methods. Further, the findings challenge idealized images of the ‘local’ as a peace-loving force for change and a powerless victim of Western domination. The hierarchical sisterhood that over time evolved between the two actors, founded on basic shared values related to women’s situation, was driven by mutual benefit. Acknowledging advantages of this type of transnational encounters in peacebuilding contexts, the study raises questions about dilemmas in them and underlines the importance of rhetorical listening.

  • Díaz Reviriego, Isabel
    et al.
    Beck, Silke
    Darbi, Marianne
    Hauck, Jennifer
    Hudson, Christian
    Janz, Christophe
    Klenk, Nicole
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Montana, Jasper
    Obermeister, Noam
    Raab, Kristina
    Schoolenberg, Mactheld
    Settele, Josef
    Turnhout, Esther
    Neßhöver, Carsten
    Five years of IPBES : Reflecting the achievements and challenges and identifying needs for its review towards a 2nd work programme.  2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On 17 to 19th October 2017, twenty-four academics and practitioners with diverse inter- and transdisciplinary experiences gathered for a workshop to collectively reflect on IPBES’ work and performance. The workshop was held at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) in Leipzig. The workshop and this report represent an effort to proactively contribute to IPBES’ ongoing (external) review process. The external review process opens up a window of opportunity towards re-thinking the very purpose of IPBES and identifying new pathways to live up to its initial ambitions, such as to move beyond assessments. The workshop identified a spectrum of potential opportunities, provided visions for the future work of IPBES, and collected insights into how to cope with them. While the workshop focussed on identifying future challenges and possible solutions, all participants underlined the great achievements that IPBES has already accomplished. This report provides a synthesis of the workshop discussions. The main recommendations for the external review were:

     - The external review should seize the opportunity to establish itself in a responsive and future-oriented way so that it not only assesses past performance but also facilitates learning and identifies new pathways for IPBES. It is important that the focus of the review is not just on the extent to which IPBES has fulfilled its ambitions but also on the efficiency with which it has done this, and on the potential unintended effects of decisions.

     - For IPBES to achieve its initial ambitions, strengthening the (mainly global-scale) scientific knowledge base behind assessments is necessary but not yet sufficient. To meet its broader set of goals, it is required to pay critical attention to all aspects of policy support, knowledge generation and capacity-building, including the meaningful participation of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities and the incorporation of local and indigenous knowledge. This will require building synergies between knowledge systems, promoting the engagement of the social sciences and humanities, and addressing current challenges in the nomination and selection procedures for the identification of experts.

     - The external review also opens up space to identify a full range of alternative options and choices that are available when reforming IPBES. The review should engage in real-world dialogues and liaise closely with partners from research, policy and practice as well as with national platforms and local actors.

  • Mielle, Malcolm
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A method to segment maps from different modalities using free space layout MAORIS: map of ripples segmentation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to divide floor plans or navigation maps into semantic representations, such as rooms and corridors, is an important research question in fields such as human-robot interaction, place categorization, or semantic mapping. While most works focus on segmenting robot built maps, those are not the only types of map a robot, or its user, can use. We present a method for segmenting maps from different modalities, focusing on robot built maps and hand-drawn sketch maps, and show better results than state of the art for both types.

    Our method segments the map by doing a convolution between the distance image of the map and a circular kernel, and grouping pixels of the same value. Segmentation is done by detecting ripple-like patterns where pixel values vary quickly, and merging neighboring regions with similar values.

    We identify a flaw in the segmentation evaluation metric used in recent works and propose a metric based on Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). We compare our results to ground-truth segmentations of maps from a publicly available dataset, on which we obtain a better MCC than the state of the art with 0.98 compared to 0.65 for a recent Voronoi-based segmentation method and 0.70 for the DuDe segmentation method.

    We also provide a dataset of sketches of an indoor environment, with two possible sets of ground truth segmentations, on which our method obtains an MCC of 0.56 against 0.28 for the Voronoi-based segmentation method and 0.30 for DuDe.

  • Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Schindler, Maike
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany .
    The nature and use of theories in statistics education: looking back, looking forward2018In: Looking back, looking forward / [ed] M. A. Sorto, A. White, & L. Guyot, Voorburg, The Netherlands: The International Statistical Institute, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories have a significant role for scientific work—also for statistics education research (SER). This paper elaborates on the use of theories in SER, based on findings of a literature review on the nature and use of theories in SER. In particular, we address theoretical issues and possible directions to further theory development in SER. Subsequently, we discuss five themes that in our view need further attention in SER. 

  • Folkesson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Heat shock proteins in exercised human skeletal muscle2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise is considered as an important stressor accompanied by concerted molecular and cellular changes leading to adaptations at the level of skeletal muscle size and function. An important protein family produced by cells in response to stressful conditions is the heat shock proteins (HSPs). It is suggested that the different HSPs play specific roles in acute and longterm responses to exercise-induced stress. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore the expression of four different HSPs (αB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70) in human skeletal muscle exposed to exercise, with a special emphasis on the role played by HSP27 in the hypertrophy of human skeletal muscle.

    One of the major findings was the fibre type-specific expression of HSPs in resting human skeletal muscle, including the preferential expression of HSP27 in fast type II muscle fibres. Another finding was the occurrence of training background-related differences in the expression of HSPs. Also, a cytoplasmic relocation of HSP27, occurring specifically in type II muscle fibres, was shown in response to a single bout of resistance exercise. Interestingly, there were no corresponding changes in response to an endurance exercise bout, suggesting that HSP27 may be specifically involved in the adaptations to resistance exercise. In order to test this hypothesis, an in-vitro exercise model based on the electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) of muscle cells was developed. The EPS protocol, including an 8 h restitution period, induced a significant hypertrophy of muscle cells together with molecular changes similar to those previously described in response to exercise in humans. The role of HSP27 in the hypertrophy of human muscle cells was examined through the downregulation of HSP27. Based on data from morphological and microarray analyses, findings indicate that HSP27 is not mandatory for the hypertrophy of human muscle cells. Overall, the present thesis clarified the expression of different HSPs in human skeletal muscle and provided an in-vitro-based approach for the elucidation of the exact role played by HSPs in the adaptations of human skeletal muscle to exercise.

    List of papers
    1. The expression of heat shock protein in human skeletal muscle: effects of muscle fibre phenotype and trainingbackground
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The expression of heat shock protein in human skeletal muscle: effects of muscle fibre phenotype and trainingbackground
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    2013 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 209, no 1, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds.

    Methods

    Three groups of subjects were included: healthy active not engaged in any training programme (ACT, n = 12), resistance trained (RES, n = 6) and endurance trained (END, n = 8). Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis, and immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain I and IIA, αB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70.

    Results

    In ACT and RES, but not in END, a fibre type–specific expression with higher staining intensity in type I than type II fibres was seen for αB-crystallin. The opposite (II > I) was found for HSP27 in subjects from ACT (6 of 12 subjects) and RES (3 of 6), whereas all subjects from END displayed uniform staining. HSP60 showed no fibre-specific expression. HSP70 displayed a fibre-specific expression pattern (I > II) in ACT (4 of 12), but not in END or RES.

    Conclusion

    This study shows that the level of expression of the different HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type–specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training, whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 is influenced only by endurance training, suggesting the existence of a training-modality-specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
    Keywords
    adaptation; adaptation; endurance; heat shock protein; immunohistochemistry; resistance
    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Physiology/Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-30127 (URN)10.1111/apha.12124 (DOI)000322950400006 ()23710799 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84881557932 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agency:

    Nordea Foundation

    Available from: 2013-08-06 Created: 2013-08-06 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Immunohistochemical changes in the expression of HSP27 in exercised human vastus lateralis muscle
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immunohistochemical changes in the expression of HSP27 in exercised human vastus lateralis muscle
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    2008 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 194, no 3, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The role of HSP27 in the adaptive process of skeletal muscle to exercise, especially in humans, is not well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate immunohistochemical changes in HSP27 expression in human vastus lateralis muscle following resistance and endurance exercises.

    Methods: Two different exercise protocols were used: (1) one-leg ergometer cycling (EC, n = 6) consisting of two 30-min bouts at 40% and 75% of peak oxygen uptake, respectively, and (2) leg extension resistance exercise (RE, n = 9) including 10 sets of eight repetitions at a load corresponding to 70% of one maximal repetition (1RM). Immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies was used to determine the location of HSP27 protein in muscle biopsies from human vastus lateralis.

    Results: Our results show that RE, but not EC, induced a significant appearance of scattered accumulations of HSP27 protein in muscle fibres from five of nine subjects. The number of fibres with accumulation of HSP27 in RE ranged from 0% to 32% with a mean of 6.3% of the total number of fibres.

    Conclusion: We conclude that this rapid HSP27 protein relocation after RE is an important player in the cellular remodelling of human muscle fibres in response to exercise involving high-force contractions, but not in response to endurance exercises.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing, 2008
    Keywords
    adaptation, endurance and resistance exercise, fibre type, heat shock protein, stress response
    National Category
    Physiology
    Research subject
    Physiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4751 (URN)10.1111/j.1748-1716.2008.01875.x (DOI)000259863100005 ()18489727 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-53549112177 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
    Available from: 2008-11-24 Created: 2008-11-24 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
    3. Electrical pulse stimulation: an in vitro exercise model for the induction of human skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy. A proof-of-concept study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrical pulse stimulation: an in vitro exercise model for the induction of human skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy. A proof-of-concept study
    2017 (English)In: Experimental Physiology, ISSN 0958-0670, E-ISSN 1469-445X, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 1405-1413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    New Findings:

    • What is the central question of this study?

    Is electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) an in vitro exercise model able to elicit the hypertrophy of human muscle cells?

    • What is the main finding and its importance?

    The addition of a restitution period of 8h after EPS induces the enlargement of human muscle cells, a major physiological end-point to resistance exercise. This is supported by downregulationof myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle mass, and increased phosphorylated mTOR and 4E-BP1, key factors in the growth cascade. This proof-of-concept study provides a model of physiologically mediated muscle growth, which will be the basis for future studies aiming to depict molecular events governing the hypertrophy of human muscle cells.

    Electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) of muscle cells has previouslybeenused as an in vitro exercise model. The present study aimedto establish an EPS protocol promoting the hypertrophy ofhuman muscle cells, which represents a major physiological end-point to resistance exercise in humans. We hypothesized that adding a resting period after EPS would be crucial for the occurrence of the morphological change. Myoblasts obtained from human muscle biopsies (n=5) were differentiated into multinucleated myotubes and exposed to 8h of EPS consisting of 2ms pulses at 12V, with a frequency of 1Hz. Myotube size was assessed using immunohistochemistry immediately, 4 and 8h after completed EPS. Gene expression and phosphorylation status of selected markers of hypertrophy were assessed using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Release of the myokine interleukin-6 in culture medium was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We demonstrated a significant increase (31 +/- 14%; P=0.03) in the size of myotubes when EPS was followed by an 8h resting period, but not immediately or 4h after completion of EPS. The response was supported by downregulation (P=0.04) of the gene expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle mass, and an increase in phosphorylated mTOR (P=0.03) and 4E-BP1 (P=0.01), which are important factors in the cellular growth signalling cascade. The present work demonstrates that EPS is an in vitro exercise model promoting the hypertrophy of human muscle cells, recapitulating a major physiological end-point to resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keywords
    Cell growth, muscle contraction, myotube morphology
    National Category
    Physiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61685 (URN)10.1113/EP086581 (DOI)000414175100010 ()28861930 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032974682 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
    4. HSP27 is not mandatory for the hypertrophy of human skeletal muscle cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>HSP27 is not mandatory for the hypertrophy of human skeletal muscle cells
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Physiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69017 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
  • Kucner, Tomasz Piotr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Probabilistic Mapping of Spatial Motion Patterns for Mobile Robots2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To bring robots closer to real-world autonomy, it is necessary to equip them with tools allowing them to perceive, model and behave adequately to dynamic changes in the environment. The idea of incorporating information about dynamics not only in the robots reactive behaviours but also in global planning process stems from the fact that dynamic changes are typically not completely random and follow spatiotemporal patterns. The overarching idea behind the work presented in this thesis is to investigate methods allowing to represent the variety of the real-world spatial motion patterns in a compact, yet expressive way. The primary focus of the presented work is on building maps capturing the motion patterns of dynamic objects and/or the flow of continuous media.

    The contribution of this thesis is twofold. First, I introduce Conditional-Transition Map: a representation for modelling motion patterns of dynamic objects as a multimodal flow of occupancy over a grid map. Furthermore, in this thesis I also propose an extension (Temporal Conditional-Transition Map), which models the speed of said flow. The proposed representations connect the changes of occupancy among adjacent cells. Namely, they build conditional models of the direction to where occupancy is heading given the direction from which the occupancy arrived. Previously, all of the representations modelling dynamics in grid maps assumed cell independence. The representations assuming cell independence are substantially less expressive and store only information about the observed levels of dynamics (i.e. how frequent changes are at a certain location). In contrast, the proposed representations also encode information about the direction of motion. Furthermore, the multimodal and conditional character of the representations allows to distinguish and correctly model intersecting flows. The capabilities of the introduced grid-based representations are demonstrated with experiments performed on real-world data sets.

    In the second part of this thesis, I introduce Circular Linear Flow Field map modelling flow of continuous media and discrete objects. This representation, in contrast to the work presented in the first part of this thesis, does not model occupancy changes directly. Instead, it employs a field of Gaussian Mixture Models, whose local elements are probability distributions of (instantaneous) velocities, to describe motion patterns. Since it assumes only velocity measurements, the proposed representation have been used to model a broad spectrum of dynamics including motion patterns of people and airflow. Using a Gaussian Mixture Model allows to capture the multimodal character of real-world dynamics (e.g. intersecting flows) and also to account for flow variability. In addition to the basic learning algorithms, I present solutions (sampling-based and kernel-based approach) for the problem of building a dense Circular Linear Flow Field map using spatially sparse but temporally dense sets of measurements. In the end, I present how to use the Circular Linear Flow Field map in motion planning to achieve flow compliant trajectories. The capabilities of Circular Linear Flow Field maps are presented and evaluated using simulated and real-world datasets.

    The spectrum of applications for the representations and approaches presented in this thesis is very broad. Among others, the results of this thesis can be used by service robots providing help for passengers in crowded airports or drones surveying landfills to detect leakages of greenhouse gases. In the case of a service robot interacting with passengers in a populated airport, the information about the flow of passengers allows to build not only the shortest path between points “A” and “B” but also enables the robot to behave seamlessly, unobtrusively and safely. In the case of a drone patrolling a landfill the impact of airflow, is equally significant. In this scenario, information about airflow allows harnessing the energy of airstreams to lower the energy consumption of a drone. Another way to utilise information about the wind flow is to use it to improve localisation of sources of gas leakage.

  • Alirezaie, Marjan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hammar, Karl
    SICS - East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Eva
    SICS - East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    SmartEnv as a network of ontology patterns2018In: Semantic Web, ISSN 1570-0844, E-ISSN 2210-4968, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 903-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we outline the details of an ontology, called SmartEnv, proposed as a representational model to assist the development process of smart (i.e., sensorized) environments. The SmartEnv ontology is described in terms of its modules representing different aspects including physical and conceptual aspects of a smart environment. We propose the use of the Ontology Design Pattern (ODP) paradigm in order to modularize our proposed solution, while at the same time avoiding strong dependencies between the modules in order to manage the representational complexity of the ontology. The ODP paradigm and related methodologies enable incremental construction of ontologies by first creating and then linking small modules. Most modules (patterns) of the SmartEnv ontology are inspired by, and aligned with, the Semantic Sensor Network (SSN) ontology, however with extra interlinks to provide further precision and cover more representational aspects.

    The result is a network of 8 ontology patterns together forming a generic representation for a smart environment. The patterns have been submitted to the ODP portal and are available on-line at stable URIs.

  • Lilliedahl, Jonathan
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art. Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Teoribaserad utvärdering av lämplighetsbedömning: Rapport från försöksverksamhet med lämplighetsbedömning vid antagning till lärar- och förskollärarutbildning2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande rapport är en utvärdering av den försöksverksamhet med lämplighetsbedömning vid antagning till lärar- och förskollärarutbildning som bedrivits vid Jönköping University på uppdrag av Universitets- och högskolerådet.

    Försöksverksamheten har varit baserad på ett särskilt regeringsbeslut grundat i antaganden om lämplighetsbedömningens mening och eventuella effekter. Därför är denna utvärdering teoribaserad, det vill säga att den utgår från antaganden om lämplighetsbedömningens funktion givet en viss verksamhetslogik.

    Utvärderingen är genomförd på lokal nivå av undertecknad och i nära anslutning till genomförd lämplighetsbedömning. Underlaget består främst av inblandade parters upplevelser i kombination med utfall under ansökningsförfarandet. Sammantaget kombineras processutvärderande delar med mer effektutvärderande resonemang. En mer omfattande utvärdering kommer att genomföras av ansvarig myndighet, Universitets- och högskolerådet.

    Resultat talar för att krav på visad lämplighet kan ha effekter på sökandes agerande under ansöknings- och antagningsfaser. Lämplighetsbedömningen har först och främst fungerat som ett prov på sökande motivation för att bli antagen till utbildningen. Kravet som sådant – att sökande måste uppvisat lämplighet för behörighet till utbildningen – har förmodligen haft störst effekt, även om behållningen av självbedömning och andra aspekter inte bör underskattas.

    Välkommen att läsa utvärderingen i sin helhet för en mer utvecklad redogörelse av ovanstående.

  • Lilliedahl, Jonathan
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The recontextualisation of knowledge: towards a social realist approach to curriculum and didactics2015In: Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, ISSN 2002-0317, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 40-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the relationship of curriculum and didactics through a social realist lens. Curriculum and didactics are viewed as linked and integrated by the common issue of educational content. The author argues that the selection of educational content and its organisation is a matter of recontextualising principles and that curriculum and didactics may be understood as interrelated stages of such recontextualisation. Educational policy and the organisation of pedagogic practice are considered as distinct although closely related practices of ‘curricularisation’ and ‘pedagogisation’. Neo-Bernsteinian social realism implies a sociological approach by which educational knowledge is recognised as something socially constructed, but irreducible to power struggles in policy arenas. More precisely, curriculum and didactics are not only matters of extrinsic standpoints. Recontextualising practices may also involve intrinsic features, that is, some kind of relatively generative logics that regulate curriculum design as well as pedagogic practice. In order to highlight certain implications for both curriculum and didactic theory, the author develops a typology that is analytically framed by principles of extrinsic relations to and intrinsic relations within curriculum or didactics.

  • Lilliedahl, Jonathan
    et al.
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Teoribaserad utvärdering som svar på det tidiga 2000-talets frågor om utbildningsreformer2016In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 9-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory-based evaluation in response to the issues of education reforms in the early 2000s

    The current surge of interest in evidence based policy has re-actualised issues of research, policy and pedagogic practice. Research are expected to support the development of systematically substantiated reforms as well as evidence-based practices. At the same time, criticism has been brought against dominant evaluation models. The question is whether they really respond to an increasingly complex landscape of governance, and the varying conditions and variations that characterize today’s schools? This article examines the potential of a theory-based evaluation model in order to systematically and empirically investigate education reforms. This approach provides the ability to include analysis of how transnational, national and local discourses converge and diverge in relation to each other, to take different kinds of contexts into consideration, and how these contexts affect the recontextualisation of pedagogic discourse. In order to further develop the approach of a theory-based evaluation, the authors point to recent steps within mixed methods research in relation to the design of, and findings in an empirical case study of the Swedish curriculum reform, Curriculum for the compulsory school, preschool class and the recreation centre, Lgr 11. Based on policy analyses, four hypotheses are presented: (i) the hypothesis of reform; (ii) the hypothesis of teachers’ professional practice; (iii) the hypothesis of teaching repertoires; (iv) and the hypothesis of assessment practices. Each of these hypotheses has been followed up by questionnaire responses and interviews.  The sequential explanatory design in this study relates critically transnational policy arenas to national education reforms and pedagogic practice in order to test the weight of the empirical evidence obtained. On the grounds of conclusion, there are reasons to revive and further develop the tradition of theory-based evaluations. Therefore, the article put forward theoretical and methodological proposals for the continued direction.

  • Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Lilliedahl, Jonathan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Why "What" Matters: On the Content Dimension of Music Didactics2014In: Philosophy of Music Education Review, ISSN 1063-5734, E-ISSN 1543-3412, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 132-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the most important function of education to provide students with basic skills and useful knowledge in order to eventually become employable? In many parts of the world knowledge league tables and policy documents inform us this is the case. As the question of what should form the educational content seems to be answered, teachers can concentrate on how they should teach, and researchers can concentrate on what method is the most effective. In the current rhetoric, however, many vital pedagogical issues have been placed in the background and the aesthetic subjects are downgraded. These tendencies worried Frede V. Nielsen who stated that didactic studies and philosophical inquiries yet again are needed to explore and give substance to the content dimension. Nielsen's writings on didactics form the basis for this essay, where we highlight which perspectives and dilemmas could be placed on a critical, philosophical didactic study agenda. The starting point is the field of tension between the what and the why of education.

  • Canelhas, Daniel Ricão
    et al.
    Univrses AB, Strängnäs, Sweden.
    Stoyanov, Todor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A Survey of Voxel Interpolation Methods and an Evaluation of Their Impact on Volumetric Map-Based Visual Odometry2018In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA),, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voxel volumes are simple to implement and lend themselves to many of the tools and algorithms available for 2D images. However, the additional dimension of voxels may be costly to manage in memory when mapping large spaces at high resolutions. While lowering the resolution and using interpolation is common work-around, in the literature we often find that authors either use trilinear interpolation or nearest neighbors and rarely any of the intermediate options. This paper presents a survey of geometric interpolation methods for voxel-based map representations. In particular we study the truncated signed distance field (TSDF) and the impact of using fewer than 8 samples to perform interpolation within a depth-camera pose tracking and mapping scenario. We find that lowering the number of samples fetched to perform the interpolation results in performance similar to the commonly used trilinear interpolation method, but leads to higher framerates. We also report that lower bit-depth generally leads to performance degradation, though not as much as may be expected, with voxels containing as few as 3 bits sometimes resulting in adequate estimation of camera trajectories.

  • Köckemann, Uwe
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Alirezaie, Marjan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Integrating Ontologies for Context-based Constraint-based Planning2018In: MRC 2018: Modelling and Reasoning in Context, 2018, p. 22-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe an approach for integrating ontologies with a constraint-based planner to compile configuration planning domains based on the current context. We consider two alternative approaches: The first one integrates SPARQL queries directly with the planner while the second one generates SPARQL queries dynamically from provided triples. The first approach offers the full freedom of the SPARQL query language, while the second offers a more dynamic way for the planner to influence queries based on what is currently relevant for the planner. We evaluate the approach based on how much redundancy is removed by “outsourcing” knowledge into the ontology compared to modeling it directly into the domain of the planner.

  • Söderman, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The adaptation of the Dignity Care Intervention to a Swedish context2018In: Nordic Conference in Nursing Research - Methods and Networks for the future, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Dignity Care Intervention (DCI) was developed in Scotland by Johnston and co-workers for nurses in municipality care, to enhance dignity in persons with palliative care needs. DCI includes a questionnaire, examples of reflective questions and suggests care actions. DCI has been tested in Ireland, and is now adapted to Swedish.

    Objective: To translate and adapt the DCI to a Swedish palliative context.

    Method: The questionnaire was translated and adapted into Swedish and reviewed by an expert group, before validated in cognitive interviews (N=7) with older persons. To update evidence concerning care actions from a Swedish context, a review of Swedish research literature and interviews with older persons, relatives and health care professionals were carried out. This gathered knowledge has been integrated into the Swedish DCI (DCI-SWE) and a feasibility study now takes place in one municipality in home care, Sweden. Included nurses got repeated information and participated in a shorter DCI-education, and will use the DCI in their everyday work for three months. Follow-up interviews will be conducted and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The Swedish version of the questionnaire was experienced relevant for older persons, and both the Swedish review and the interviews gave culturally relevant proposals about dignity care actions. Further, a feasibility study will contribute to the ongoing development of the Swedish DCI-version.

    Conclusion and implication for practice: Implementing DCI in Sweden can enhance dignity in persons with palliative care needs and facilitate for a person-centered care.

  • Söderman, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Enhancing dignity in older persons in Sweden: adaptation of the Dignity Care Intervention2018In: 24th Nordic Congress of Gerontology, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background : In end of life, the older persons´ experiences of dignity can be affected due to serious illness and life changes, derived from physical, psychological, social and existential dimension. Loss of dignity impact the persons´ will to live. The Dignity Care Intervention (DCI) was developed and tested in Scotland and Ireland, to enhance dignity of older persons with palliative care needs, by nurses in municipality care. DCI consists a patient dignity inventory, reflective questions and examples of evidence-based care actions.

    The aim was to develop and adapt the DCI to a Swedish context.

    Methods: The patient dignity inventory was overall accepted by older persons in home care, however some changes in the wording were performed. The Swedish care actions reflected mostly earlier care actions described in the original version. However some more care actions derived in some of the categories in the Swedish DCI (DCI-SWE) e.g. “social support”, and some less care actions derived for example in the category “aftermath concerns”.  In DCI-SWE general care actions like e.g. to show respect were concretized unlike the original DCI.

    Conclusions: The DCI-SWE has prospects to enhance older persons´ dignity, and is now tested in a feasibility study by twelve nurses in home care.

  • Söderman, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    En intervention för att bevara sköra äldre personers värdighet: utveckling och anpassning till en svensk kontext 2018In: Forskningen och utvecklingens dag, 2018, Örebro, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Utvärdering av palliativ vård i Sverige har visat att vården är ojämlik och att äldre personer får sämre palliativ vård. För att främja äldre personers livskvalitet den sista tiden i livet är bevarande av värdighet grundläggande. Förlust av värdighet kan innebära förtvivlan, en känsla av att vara en börda för andra och en önskan om att få dö, vanliga upplevelser hos sköra äldre personer. Konkreta arbetssätt behöver därför utvecklas för att bevara äldre personers värdighet, vilket idag saknas inom svensk palliativ vård. En värdighetsbevarande intervention (DCI) har utvecklats och prövats i Skottland och Irland. Interventionen består av ett formulär för kartläggning av värdighet, reflekterande frågor samt evidensbaserade vårdhandlingar.

    Syfte: Syftet var att utveckla och anpassa DCI till en svensk kontext.

    Metod: Utveckling och kulturanpassning skedde genom 1) översättning och anpassning av formuläret till svensk kontext via en expertpanel och via kognitiva intervjuer med äldre personer 2) identifiering av värdighetsbevarande vårdhandlingar relevanta för en svensk kontext, utifrån en litteraturgenomgång samt via intervjuer med äldre personer, deras närstående och vårdpersonal.

    Resultat: Mindre revideringar av formuläret genomfördes, men överlag accepterades det av de äldre personerna. Identifierade värdighetsbevarande vårdhandlingar speglade mestadels de redan angivna i originalversionen DCI. Dock framkom fler vårdhandlingar än i originalet vid några av kategorierna i den svenska DCI (DCI-SWE) som t.ex. ”socialt stöd”, medan det framkom färre vårdhandlingar än originalet vid t.ex. ”dödens följder för andra”. I DCI-SWE konkretiserades generella vårdhandlingar som t.ex. att lyssna och visa respekt, till skillnad från originalet.

    Konklusion: DCI-SWE har möjlighet att främja sköra äldre personers värdighet, och prövas nu av sjuksköterskor i en genomförbarhetsstudie inom hemsjukvården.

  • Björkvall, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Det värdefulla skräpet: ”Upcycling” och värdeökningens semiotik2018In: Grammatik, kritik, didaktik: Nordiska studier i systemisk-funktionell lingvistik och socialsemiotik / [ed] Inga-Lill Grahn, Hans Landqvist, Benjamin Lyngfelt, Andreas Nord, Lena Rogström, Barbro Wallgren Hemlin, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018, Vol. 34, p. 55-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • Ekström, Cecilia
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Enabling and Coercive Control: Coexistence in the Case of Banking2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on subjects of control and attitudinal outcomes of formalized control in organizations. Previous research have concluded contradicting results of whether formalized control is positive or negative for the employees and propose that not only degree of formalization, but also type of formalization, can explain attitudinal outcomes.

    With the theoretical perspective of Adler and Borys’ concepts of enabling and coercive types of control, this thesis explore the concepts and practices of enabling and coercive control, and their relationships with attitudinal outcomes. This is done with a focus on the banking industry, which serve as a case of an extensively regulated context. An assumption put forth in this thesis is that the context in which individuals are part must be considered in the study of attitudinal outcomes of control.

    The analysis show that both enabling and coercive control can be found in banking, for example in business plans and regulations. However, the picture emerging is more complex than enabling control leading to positive attitudes, and coercive control leading to negative attitudes. Also, coexistence of enabling and coercive control is responded to with decoupling and acquiescence, and by drawing on global transparency.

    Based on these findings, together with theoretical elaborations, this thesis contribute to the literature of enabling and coercive control in a number of ways. First, it make explicit central concepts and relationships within the theory, such as design vs. perception, the role of zone of indifference as an outcome of control, and enabling and coercive control as dual roles or qual-ities of control. Moreover, this thesis suggests that multiple-level explanations to attitudinal outcomes of control, where contextual and institutional structures are considered, helps us understand attitudes to control in this context. Lastly, this thesis contribute to the notion of coexistence of enabling and coercive control by showing that coexistence can be simultaneous systems, and simultaneous cognitions, where a control can be perceived as both enabling and coercive at the same time.

  • Holmberg, John
    et al.
    Larsson, Jörgen
    Nässén, Jonas
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andersson, David
    Low-carbon transitions and the good life2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A transition to a low-carbon economy requires farreaching reductions in emissions, which in addition will have to take place at the same time as the global population is growing. A growing population also makes ever greater demands on welfare, while the ecological, social and economic systems that have to sustain this development are already under severe strain. It is commonly argued that emission reductions in a growing world economy can and should be achieved by technical innovations so that the transition to a low-carbon economy does not imply a negative impact on human well-being.

    This report discusses whether there might perhaps be another way of understanding the situation. Is the presumed linkage between well-being and climate impact always negative? Could a greater focus on human well-being be a driver of, rather than an obstacle to, sustainable development? This report attempts to identify possible strategies to support both [the good life] and decreased emissions. By adopting this research approach, the authors aim to make a contribution to the discussion of low-carbon transitions in society.

  • Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sent på jorden2017In: Röda rummet, ISSN 1403–3844, Vol. 173-174, no 1-2, p. 10-11Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Svenberg, Sebastian
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elam, Mark
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swedish Nuclear Waste Management on the Move: From the Finnish Uptake of KBS-3 to the Rise of SKB International2014Report (Other academic)
  • Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social ontologi2017In: Salongen - Nettidsskrift for filosofi og idehistorieArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))