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  • Larsson, Christina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Music improvisation as an aesthetic event: Towards a transactional approach to meaning-making2018In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 121-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvisation in general music education is still a somewhat underdeveloped practice. Moreover, attempts to justify its place in the curriculum have often focused solely on its (measurable) outcomes. In this article, we claim that a deeper understanding of students' meaning-making processes in experiences of improvisation is necessary in order to develop improvisation practice and research. The purpose of this article is to offer a music education perspective on improvisation based on John Dewey's transactional perspective on aesthetic experience and meaning-making. Related to this, we suggest and illustrate a Practical Epistemology Analysis (PEA) as a way of analysing meaning-making in music improvisation within general music education. The method of analysis is illustrated by vignettes from video analyses of music lessons in two Swedish schools with pupils aged 9-10 and their free improvisations. The vignettes show how PEA enables analyses of situated meaning-making in the progress of the pupils' improvisation activities. Further, the transactional perspective makes educational values of improvisation visible, such as musical and personal agency, and elucidates cognitive, embodied and ethical aspects of musical meaning-making.

  • Axelsson, Tobias
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Instruments to foster long-term paternal involvement in family work: Fostering paternal involvement, gender equality and caring masculinities2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses recent parenting policies – parental leave and formal childcare policies – in Sweden and Germany. It argues that parenting policies can support paternal involvement, gender equality and caring masculinities, although with some limitations. The paper recommends an increased focus of men as fathers, children's needs, and time in parenting policies.  

  • Liang, Yuli
    Statistiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    Contributions to Estimation and Testing Block Covariance Structures in Multivariate Normal Models2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns inference problems in balanced random effects models with a so-called block circular Toeplitz covariance structure. This class of covariance structures describes the dependency of some specific multivariate two-level data when both compound symmetry and circular symmetry appear simultaneously.

    We derive two covariance structures under two different invariance restrictions. The obtained covariance structures reflect both circularity and exchangeability present in the data. In particular, estimation in the balanced random effects with block circular covariance matrices is considered. The spectral properties of such patterned covariance matrices are provided. Maximum likelihood estimation is performed through the spectral decomposition of the patterned covariance matrices. Existence of the explicit maximum likelihood estimators is discussed and sufficient conditions for obtaining explicit and unique estimators for the variance-covariance components are derived. Different restricted models are discussed and the corresponding maximum likelihood estimators are presented.

    This thesis also deals with hypothesis testing of block covariance structures, especially block circular Toeplitz covariance matrices. We consider both so-called external tests and internal tests. In the external tests, various hypotheses about testing block covariance structures, as well as mean structures, are considered, and the internal tests are concerned with testing specific covariance parameters given the block circular Toeplitz structure. Likelihood ratio tests are constructed, and the null distributions of the corresponding test statistics are derived.

  • Flores Ituarte, Iñigo
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Production, Section of Sustainable Production, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wiikinkoski, Olli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Jansson, Anton
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Additive Manufacturing of Polypropylene: A Screening Design of Experiment Using Laser-Based Powder Bed Fusion2018In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 1293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of commodity polymers such as polypropylene (PP) is key to open new market segments and applications for the additive manufacturing industry. Technologies such as powder-bed fusion (PBF) can process PP powder; however, much is still to learn concerning process parameters for reliable manufacturing. This study focusses in the process–property relationships of PP using laser-based PBF. The research presents an overview of the intrinsic and the extrinsic characteristic of a commercial PP powder as well as fabrication of tensile specimens with varying process parameters to characterize tensile, elongation at break, and porosity properties. The impact of key process parameters, such as power and scanning speed, are systematically modified in a controlled design of experiment. The results were compared to the existing body of knowledge; the outcome is to present a process window and optimal process parameters for industrial use of PP. The computer tomography data revealed a highly porous structure inside specimens ranging between 8.46% and 10.08%, with porosity concentrated in the interlayer planes in the build direction. The results of the design of experiment for this commercial material show a narrow window of 0.122 > Ev > 0.138 J/mm3 led to increased mechanical properties while maintaining geometrical stability.

  • Liang, Yuli
    et al.
    Statistiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Statistiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    von Rosen, Dietrich
    Block Circular Symmetry in Multilevel Models2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Models that describe symmetries present in the error structure of observations have been widely used in dierent applications, with early examples from psychometric and medical research. The aim of this article is to study a multilevel model with a covariance structure that is block circular symmetric. Useful results are obtained for the spectra of these structured matrices.

  • Liang, Yuli
    et al.
    Statistiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Statistiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    von Rosen, Dietrich
    The Department of Energy and Technology, SLU, Uppsala.
    Estimation in multilevel models with block circular symmetric covariance structure2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we consider a multilevel model with block circular symmetric covariance structure. Maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters of this model is discussed. We show that explicit maximum likelihood estimators of variance components exist under certain restrictions on the parameter space.

  • Bagger, Anette
    Department of science and mathematics education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Prövningen av en skola för alla: nationella provet i matematik i det tredje skolåret2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the contribution to research that my doctoral education led to. My starting point was a large scale qualitative research project (here after called the VR-project) which reviewed the implementation of national tests in the third grade on the subject of mathematics. The VR-project investigated how the test affected the pupils with a special focus on pupils in need of special support. An urge to look further into issues concerning the support, the pupil in need and the test was revealed in he initial VR-project. These issues therefore constitutes the problem area of this thesis. The VR-project studied a total of 22 classrooms in two different municipalities' during 2010- 2012. The methodology used for this project was inspired by ethnography and discourse analysis. The raw data consisted of test instructions, video observations of the actual test subjects, interviews from teachers and pupils about the test, the support that was given throughout the testing as well as the observations and interviews of the pupils requiring special assistance. Activated discourses and positions of the participants were demarcated. The results revealed that a traditional testing discourse, a caring discourse and a competitive discourse are activated during the tests. The testing discourse is stable and traditional. Much of what was shown and said in classrooms, routines and rules regarding the test were repeated in all the schools and in all the classrooms. The discourse on support is affected by ambiguity, which is revealed especially when issues of pupils’ equity is put against the tests equality. This is connected to the teachers restricted agency to give support due to the teacher position as a test taker. The positions in need that are available to students are not the same in pupils, teachers and steering documents. The situation is especially troublesome for pupils that do not manage Swedish good enough to take the test and for pupils in need of special support. Some of the conclusions from this thesis is that the national test format: Disciplines not only the pupil, but also the teacher, the classroom and the school at large. Results indicate that the test:

    Activates a focus on achievementLeads attention away from learning Activates issues of accountability Influences pupils and teachers with stakes involved

    Besides evaluating knowledge, the test disciplines not only the pupil, but also the teacher, the classroom and the school at large. Discussing the national test as an arena for equity might be a way towards attaining equality in education for all pupils.

  • Public defence: 2019-03-01 13:15 Örebro universitet, Gymnastik- och idrottshuset, Hörsal G, Örebro
    Svensson, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Från träningsoverall till trenchcoat: Tränarpositionens förändring inom svensk herrelitfotboll mellan 1960- och 2010-talet2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The position of the coach in elite sports has changed radically over the last 50 years. Using the Swedish male elite soccer coach as an example, the aim of this thesis is to acquire a deeper understanding of this change. The purpose is to examine the changing position of the Swedish male elite soccer coach in relation to the changing conditions of elite soccer between the 1960s and the 2010s. The history of the Swedish soccer coach is analysed through the lens of the Foucauldian perspective of governmentality. Focusing on the constitution of subject positions, the thesis identifies the power/knowledge relationships formulated within the governmentalities of Swedish elite football clubs and the Swedish Football Association (SvFF). A text analysis of board minutes and annual reports from the Swedish elite soccer club IFK Norrköping, education material from coaching courses organised by SvFF and the transcripts of semi-structured qualitative interviews with former and still active Swedish elite soccer coaches has been conducted.

    The analysis shows that at the beginning of the 1960s the established power/knowledge relationship implied that, kitted out in a whole and clean tracksuit, the coach was expected to govern the players’ techniques and fitness training twice a week. However, in order to be internationally competitive, in 1967 SvFF overturned the amateur regulations and instead allowed Swedish clubs to sign professional contracts with the players. From then on the coach was given more time to “conduct the conduct” of the players. In parallel, the clubs and SvFF turned to scientific knowledge and expertise in the areas of physiology and tactics and later sport psychology, leadership and communication. As a consequence, new power/knowledge relationships were formulated which meant that the coach was not only expected to govern new and more dimensions of the players, but also a growing staff of assistant coaches. In addition, dressed in tailor-made trench coat, the coach became the club’s outward face for attracting sponsors and communicating with the media and fans.

  • Bagger, Anette
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Den flerspråkiga elevens nationella provdeltagande i matematik: diskursiva förutsättningar2017In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multilingual students’ participation in national tests in mathematics – discursive prerequisites. This article explores discursive prerequisites in test-taking for second language learners with other mother tongues than Swedish. Four students were interviewed in 2016 during their final year of compulsory school. The results imply that multilingual students are positioned as disadvantaged within testing. This phenomenon is mainly situated in a competitive discourse with several subordinated discourses that further position the students: A discourse of justice positioned the students as being sorted or left behind, a discourse of handling the assessment positioned the students as caretakers and a discourse of future challenges positioned the students as struggling while learning, being capable to learn or facing positive challenges. The results imply that national testing is a personal and relational experience and gives rise to issues of legitimacy and equality. These issues should be considered in policy-making, the construction and the carrying out of tests as well as in the conclusions which are based on the results on individual, group and organisational levels.

  • Bagger, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Björklund Boistrup, Lisa
    Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Norén, Eva
    Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The governing of three researchers' technologies of the self2018In: The Montana Mathematics Enthusiast, ISSN 1551-3440, E-ISSN 1551-3440, Vol. 15, no 1-2, p. 278-302, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sheds light on a number of discursive conditions relating to being researchers in mathematics education and with an interest in diversity. The data derived from a self-reflective trialogue (dialogue of three people) between the three authors, three researchers. Two of Foucault’s governing technologies were adopted: technologies of power and technologies of the self. By exploring regularities between these in our trialogue we construed formations of governing technologies in relation to subjectification and subjectivation. We uncovered five formations: “Tensions between mathematics education (ME) researchers from different traditions through processes of normalization and othering”, “Limiting space between ME researchers within the socio- political through dismissal of knowledge”, “The socio-political tradition of a need for theory connects theory and ME researcher's’ self-cultivation”, “The researchers’ processes of self-cultivation connect theory and compassionate research practices”. and “Research on policy statements as resistance towards technologies of domination in society”. 

  • Sundström Sjödin, Elin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Where is the critical in literacy?: Tracing performances of literature reading, readers and non-readers in educational practice2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many instances in society, educational and other, literature reading is emphasised as something that develops persons in positive ways. The present thesis explores this claim in relation to literature reading in educational practices. By tracing how values and critical aspects of reading are enacted, the purpose is both to problematize taken-for-granted truth claims about literature reading and to develop an understanding of the elements involved when reading, readers and critical aspects of reading are created. The studies focus on different educational practices; a teacher’s narrative about grading, information brochures about reading to children and the policy and practice of a reading project at special residential homes for detained youth in Sweden. In these practices, the thesis explores where and when the critical takes place, in what constellations and with what consequences. The thesis draws on critical literacy, where reading is regarded as taking action and having self-empowering potential. However, with help of a pragmatic and material semiotic approach, the investigations steps away from what is taken for granted about reading and about what critical means, and instead reading, readers and the critical are analysed as transactional effects.

    The studies show how students can be placed at risk by rationales for reading literature that construct and establish them as lacking of culture or as literacy inadequate. The thesis further shows that the critical in literacy can be ambivalent as well as multiple, and it can be enacted by both human, discursive and material actors.

    List of papers
    1. Enacted realities in teachers' experiences: bringing materialism into pragmatism
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enacted realities in teachers' experiences: bringing materialism into pragmatism
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 96-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore factors that constitute the social' for the teacher Susan, which at the same time highlights ethical aspects of the exercise of her profession. We meet her in a situation where she is setting grades, and our interest focuses on the relations that become of concern for her in her professional task to give the students their grades. In this exploration, we recognize the renewal of interest in realism and examine the possible links that can be drawn between transactional realism, as a pragmatic view, and the new materialism, here represented by actor-network theory. Building on a narrative from an interview with a named teacher in a daily newspaper, the empirical study focuses on actors constituting Susan's reality when grading. Our argument is that in order to understand the complex levels of aspects that influence teachers' actions, it is necessary to start from the local and from there trace the human and material factors that may affect teachers' room for action. Bringing material aspects into the consideration of Susan's situation helps us see that technology itself changes time and spaces and moves the action of grading into spaces outside her professional sphere.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2017
    Keywords
    Transactional realism, actor-network theory, assessment, teacher agency
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56159 (URN)10.1080/00220272.2016.1205139 (DOI)000393180800007 ()2-s2.0-85008517923 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
    2. Tracing reading to the dark side: investigating the policy producing reading and readers in detention homes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracing reading to the dark side: investigating the policy producing reading and readers in detention homes
    2018 (English)In: Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 887-900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Both inside and outside educational settings, reading literature is emphasized as something good, perhaps even something that makes us better people. This paper aims to open the 'black-boxed' conception of reading by studying how reading and (non)readers are conceptualized in relation to young people taken into custody. I examine a policy document describing a reading project in detention homes for young people as a case in which reading is perceived as having specific effects. Actor-network theory is used as a methodological approach to call attention to the way ideas, values, and knowledge about educational content are produced. The analysis shows that the seemingly coherent policy document produces radically different versions of what reading is and who the readers and non-readers are. I conclude that conceptualizations of reading and literacy always involve the creation of 'a dark side of reading'; the strong construction of 'reading as doing good' has marginalizing effects.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2018
    Keywords
    Literature instruction, reading projects, literacy policy, critical literacy, marginalized readers, detention homes, actor-network theory
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70038 (URN)10.1080/01596306.2017.1306486 (DOI)000447703800005 ()
    Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
    3. Starless Nights: Reading literature in a "critical space"
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Starless Nights: Reading literature in a "critical space"
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70843 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
    4. The wing chair: Where is the critical in literacy?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The wing chair: Where is the critical in literacy?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70844 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
    5. Creating the valuable: Reading as a matter of health and successful parenthood
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating the valuable: Reading as a matter of health and successful parenthood
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70845 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    Qualifying Standpoints: Stance adverbs as a presentational device for managing the burden of proof2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies from pragmatics and discourse analysis have investigated the function of stance adverbs, such as clearly, fortunately, frankly, perhaps, and technically, when used to qualify utterances. Within the field of argumentation studies, scholars who have paid attention to these words have primarily focused on the so-called modal adverbs, and have not considered the insights that can be gained by treating the class of stance adverbs as the linguistic realisation of a certain move in an argumentative discussion. This study aims to fill this gap by investigating the strategic function of stance adverbs when qualifying an utterance that functions as a standpoint. In this study, stance adverbs are examined as a presentational device at the arguer’s disposal when putting forward a standpoint. The study is comprised of three parts. In the first part, the question ‘What is a qualified standpoint?’ is answered by combining illocutionary analysis of the move of advancing a standpoint with pragma-linguistic study of stance ad­verbs. In the second part, the question ‘Why would the protagonist qualify the standpoint?’ is answered based on the concept of burden of proof, which is es­sential to the move of advancing a standpoint. In the third part, the question ‘How does standpoint qualification function strategically in an argumentative discussion?’ is answered by postulating that the protagonist of a qualified standpoint is interested in managing the burden of proof, an assumption which builds on the results of the other two parts. The book is of interest to advanced students and scholars of argumentation and communication studies as well as those interested in an explanation of language use from an argumentative perspective.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The Explicit/Implicit Distinction in Multimodal Argumentation: Comparing the Argumentative Use of Nano-Images in Scientific Journals and Science Magazines2018In: Argumentation and Inference: Proceedings of the 2nd European Conference on Argumentation, Fribourg 2017 Volume II / [ed] Steve Oswald & Didier Maillat, College Publications, 2018, p. 821-842Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The distinction between explicatures and implicatures as well as their varying degrees of strength acknowledged within Relevance Theory can help to capture the complex meaningmaking processes underlying the interpretation of multimoda ltexts as instances of argumentation. These pragmatic insights will be used to compare the ways in which arguments about the revolutionary character and societal impact of nanotechnology are constructed by computer-generated images of the nanoscale on the covers of scientific journals and science magazines.

  • Thunberg, Sara (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Uhnoo, Daniel (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nationell forskningskonferens i socialt arbete: Abstractsammanställning2018Report (Other academic)
  • Twizeyimana, Jean Damascene
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. College of Science & Technology University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Larsson, Hannu
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    E-government in Rwanda: Implementation, Challenges and Reflections2018In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E‑government is currently high on the agenda in many developing countries (DCs). While e‑government is well‑established in many developed countries it is new to least developed countries. Countries that start implementing e‑government today can benefit from easy import of modern technologies, but adaptation to local conditions and the organizational change that is required cannot be imported, but must be developed at home. By using examples of an ongoing initiative by the Government of Rwanda to digitalize all G2C and G2B into a single window platform, the current study investigated the important challenges in the implementation of e‑government in Rwanda. An interpretive case study was followed. Data was collected through interviews and participatory observations during August to December 2015. Data analysis was inductive, the analysis method was content analysis, and the coding followed open‑coding. NVivo software has been used to handle data and facilitate the analysis. The study found six overarching categories of aspects that challenge a successful implementation of e‑government in Rwanda. They include information infrastructure for e‑government, social inclusion, governance, management, trust in the new system, and languages. However, challenges to e‑government implementation should not be taken as of the same extent, neither their degree of mitigation. Rather, they influence and are influenced by various contextual factors which include political support, nature of the e‑government project, implementation strategies, human and socio‑economic development, existing information infrastructure, and operational capabilities. Having said this, we also argue that countries should learn from one another of their experiences, success stories, and mistakes. Despite a number of associated challenges, the adopted public‑private partnership (PPP) approach to e‑Government implementation in Rwanda might indeed seem as a suitable catalyst for e‑government success in the country.

    2.5.0.0

  • Swaminathan, Chittaranjan Srinivas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kucner, Tomasz Piotr
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Robert Bosch, GmbH Corporate Research, Germany.
    Lilienthal, Achim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Down the CLiFF: Flow-Aware Trajectory Planning under Motion Pattern Uncertainty2018In: 2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 7403-7409Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we address the problem of flow-aware trajectory planning in dynamic environments considering flow model uncertainty. Flow-aware planning aims to plan trajectories that adhere to existing flow motion patterns in the environment, with the goal to make robots more efficient, less intrusive and safer. We use a statistical model called CLiFF-map that can map flow patterns for both continuous media and discrete objects. We propose novel cost and biasing functions for an RRT* planning algorithm, which exploits all the information available in the CLiFF-map model, including uncertainties due to flow variability or partial observability. Qualitatively, a benefit of our approach is that it can also be tuned to yield trajectories with different qualities such as exploratory or cautious, depending on application requirements. Quantitatively, we demonstrate that our approach produces more flow-compliant trajectories, compared to two baselines.

  • Caldeborg, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Intergenerational touch in PE: a student perspective2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis takes its point of departure in the research field of intergenerational touch in Physical Education (PE). Previous research in the field have mainly been conducted from a teacher’s perspective and has shown that teachers of PE have become more cautious about using physical contact in recent years. The reasons for this more cautious attitude concerning physical contact is above all, the risk f being falsely suspected of sexual harassment. Previous research has, in a general way, also shown that physical contact in PE is a gendered issue with heteronormative points of departure The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate intergenerational touch in PE from a student perspective. More specifically the aims are to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective (paper I), and to investigate which discursive resources students draw on to conceptualize physical contact between teacher and student in PE in relation to heteronormativity (paper II). Six focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with students at an upper secondary school in Sweden. In paper I it is the concept of the didactic contract that is the theoretical starting point. The results show that, generally, the students support physical contact as a pedagogical tool if the physical contact has a good purpose according to the students. An implicit didactic contract is formed when student and teacher agree on when, how or why physical contact is used as a pedagogical tool. In paper II, the theoretical inspiration comes from Foucault and his work with discourses. The results show that the students’ talk is colored by the heteronormative discourse in society. This is especially expressed when young female students talk about male PE teachers. Heteronormativity is taken for granted and is not really challenged. Students generally support physical contact as a pedagogical tool in PE, however it is a very complex issue and puts high demands on PE teachers’ professionalism.

    List of papers
    1. Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE
    2019 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behaviour that could be regarded as suspicious (Fletcher, 2013; Öhman, 2016; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013). Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2019
    Keywords
    Intergenerational touch, physical education, student perspective, didactic contract, physical contact
    National Category
    Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62117 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2017.1346600 (DOI)000457147700004 ()2-s2.0-85021831746 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    “Don’t touch! – Pedagogical consequences of the ‘forbidden’ body in Physical Education”
    Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Intergenerational touch in relation to heteronormativity in Physical Education: a student perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intergenerational touch in relation to heteronormativity in Physical Education: a student perspective
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70141 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
  • Larsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Utvärdering och analys av projekt Leva Livet2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Leva Livet är ett projekt som drevs 2010/2011 av Göteborg Stad och som handlar om att minska medborgarnas miljöpåverkan främst genom att stimulera till frivilliga beteendeförändringar. Det främsta syftet var att lära sig mera om frivilliga miljöhandlingar för att kunna utforma en mer effektiv framtida miljökommunikation. Ett sekundärt syfte var att öka miljömedvetenheten hos Göteborgaren, att sprida kunskap och inspiration hos dem som tar del av projektet via media eller andra kanaler.

    Det finns också två huvudsakliga syften med den här utvärderingen av projektet. Dels är avsikten att bidra till lärandet om miljökommunikation inom Göteborgs stad, dels att bidra till forskningen om hur livskvalitet och miljöhandlingar (dvs handlingar som syftar till att minska miljöpåverkan) hänger ihop.1 För att uppnå dessa syften analyseras både projektupplägget och deltagarnas miljöhandlingar. Vi vill också belysa vilka miljövinster som har uppnåtts och dra vissa slutsatser om utformningen av framtida miljökommunikation gentemot medborgarna.

    En forskargrupp på Chalmers, avdelningen för Fysisk resursteori, har fått i uppdrag av Göteborgs stad att göra denna utvärdering. Vi som genomfört arbetet är Jörgen Larsson, projektansvarig för utvärderingen och Sebastian Svenberg, projektassistent och ansvarig för genomförande av intervjuerna. Vår bakgrund som sociologer ligger till grund för ett samhällsvetenskapligt perspektiv i den här utvärderingen.

    Sammanlagt har 14 intervjuer genomförts. I de familjer där det finns två vuxna i hushållet har båda två intervjuats var för sig. Alla intervjuer har genomförts hemma hos deltagarna eller i Miljöförvaltningens lokaler, förutom två intervjuer som gjordes på telefon. Två av de elva familjerna fullföljde inte sitt deltagande i projektet och avböjde att bli intervjuade. Dessutom har de tre projektledarna intervjuats. Inför intervjuerna har vi lovat intervjupersonerna att det de säger inte skall gå att koppla till vem som säger det. Ljudinspelningarna har skrivits in i ett dokument, men när vi återger citat från intervjuerna i rapporten är det inte alltid exakta citat utan ibland förkortade eller något sammanfattade uttalanden. Se bilaga 1 för intervjuguide. Utöver samtal med deltagarna har diverse dokument legat till grund för utvärderingen, bland annat enkäter som deltagarna fyllde i innan respektive efter projektet, information om utmaningar och tips på åtgärder som gavs till deltagarna. Dessa dokument finns som bilagor.

    Denna utvärdering börjar med en projektbeskrivning av innehållet i projektet Leva Livet. Det följs av kapitlet utvärdering av projektet som bland annat beskriver de miljöresultat som projektet gett upphov till och det genomslag som Leva Livet har fått genom media. Den utvärderande delen innehåller också ett avsnitt om coaching som metod, samt en utvärdering av de sociala aspekterna av projektet. Kapitlet analys av enskilda miljöhandlingar innehåller först en fördjupning kring miljöhandlingar som har med dagligt resande och med mat att göra och därefter en generell beskrivning av sju olika möjliga livskvalitetskonsekvenser av miljöhandlingar. Denna del kan förhoppningsvis innehålla vissa lärdomar om människors upplevelser av att göra förändringar i sin vardag samt utgöra en inspiration för kommunikation på miljöområdet. Sista kapitlet utgörs av vissa slutsatser och tankar om framtida miljökommunikation. Avslutningsvis kommer en sammanfattning av den här utvärderingen.

  • Strid, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Enelo, Jan-Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Cinthio, Hanna
    Baianstovu, Rúna Í
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Det hedersrelaterade våldets och förtryckets uttryck och samhällets utmaningar. En kartläggning i Göteborg, Malmö och Stockholm 2017–2018: Del III: Redovisning av den kvantitativa delstudien i Malmö2018Report (Other academic)
  • Strid, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Enelo, Jan-Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Cinthio, Hanna
    Baianstovu, Rúna Í
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Det hedersrelaterade våldets och förtryckets uttryck och samhällets utmaningar. En kartläggning i Göteborg, Malmö och Stockholm 2017–2018: Del III: Redovisning av den kvantitativa delstudien i Göteborg2018Report (Other academic)
  • Strid, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Enelo, Jan-Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Cinthio, Hanna
    Baianstovu, Rúna Í
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Det hedersrelaterade våldets och förtryckets uttryck och samhällets utmaningar. En kartläggning i Göteborg, Malmö och Stockholm 2017–2018: Del III: Redovisning av den kvantitativa delstudien i Stockholm2018Report (Other academic)
  • Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Social media as a health resource: A salutogenic perspective2018In: Young People, Social Media and Health / [ed] Victoria Goodyear & Kathleen Armour, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 71-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the consequences of pathogenic notions of health in terms of a focus on risk and disease. A salutogenic perspective is an alternative way of discussing young people, social media, and health. In a salutogenic perspective, health resources are the main focus. A salutogenic perspective can help to identify new and diverse resources that young people draw upon to support their health development, such as social relations and/or critical awareness. As a consequence, this chapter highlights the pedagogical potential of social media and how it can educate about health as part of living a good life.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Forceville, Charles
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Grannetia, Melle
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The argumentative role of visual metaphor and visual antithesis in ‘fly-on-the-wall’ documentary2015In: Proceedings of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation / [ed] Bart Garssen; David Godden; Gordon Mitchell; Francisca Snoeck Henkemans, 2015, p. 1380-1395Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the argumentative role of visual metaphor and visual antithesis in theso- fly-on-the-wall documentary. In this subtype of documentary, which emphatically renouncesvoice-over narration, the filmmakers guide their viewers into reaching certain conclusions by makingchoices regarding the editing as well as the cinematography. We analyse a number of scenes from two filmsby one major representative of the Direct Cinema or fly-on-the-wall documentary, Frederick Wiseman.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    Umiversity of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Argumentative functions of visuals: beyond claiming and justifying2013In: Virtues of argumentation: proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), 22-26 May 2013 Windsor, ON / [ed] Dima Mohammed; Marcin Lewinski, Ontario Society for the study of Argumentation (OSSA) , 2013, p. 1-17Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Up until now, the study of the argumentative role of visuals has been restricted to theformal concept of argument as product, consisting of premises and conclusion. In this paper, I adoptthe pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation as a social and discursive activity in order toexplore argumentative functions of visuals that go beyond claiming and justifying. To do this I payattention to the visual form and to the interaction between the verbal and the visual mode inargumentative discourse.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    Laboratoire Communication et Politique, CNRS, Paris, France.
    Les marqueurs d'une stratégie de gestion de la charge de la preuve: franchement et en fait qualifiant une thèse2010In: Revue Verbum, ISSN 0182-5887, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 73-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Up until now, most studies that deal with the linguistic realization of argumentationare mainly interested in the « indicative potential » of the words and phrases studiedand tend to neglect the potential strategic effect of these words in argumentativediscourse. In this article, I propose a systematic study of “illocutionary adverbs”,such as franchement and honnêtement, when they appear in the utterance thatfunctions as a standpoint. I also argue that the adverbial phrase en fait has the samestrategic effect. In order to account for the strategic role of these adverbs when theyserve as qualifiers of a standpoint, I have recourse to the concept of burden of proof,a concept that is essential to the act of advancing a standpoint. I argue that theseadverbs can be considered as a means at the arguer’s disposal when formulating hisstandpoint to manage the burden of proof to his advantage. As a result, the analystmay consider their presence in the utterance that functions as a standpoint as amarker of the strategy of managing the burden of proof.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Multimodale argumentatie: Bruggen slaan tussen argumentatieleer en multimodale analyse2016In: Tijdschrift voor Taalbeheersing, ISSN 1573-9775, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimodal argumentation: Building bridges between argumentation theory and multimodal analysis

    Since the end of the 90s there has been an increasing interest in the analysis of images and in their interplay with written language. Even though images, especially when used in advertisements, have already been studied within rhetorical approaches to communication and visual studies, there still lacks a systematic account of their contribution to the way standpoints are put forward and argumentation is advanced. At the same time, within the field of discourse analysis interest has been expressed in the analysis of visual and other non-verbal elements of communication. Nevertheless, no special attention has been paid within this field to those communicative situations where the support of a standpoint with arguments and the acceptability of the argumentation are at stake. In order to be able to analyse the various aspects of multimodal documents on their merits and to account for their argumentative relevance it is necessary to build bridges between argumentation theory and multimodal analysis. This paper discusses critically the current state of affairs regarding the analysis of multimodal documents from an argumentation studies perspective and argues for a systematic study of the interplay of the verbal and the visual modes within the framework of Pragma-dialectics. Three print advertisements are analysed in order to illustrate the merits of such an approach to the argumentative analysis of multimodal documents.

  • Tseronis, Assimakis
    Laboratoire Communication et Politique, Paris, France.
    Use and abuse of the strategic function of in fact and frankly when qualifying a standpoint2011In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 473-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to specify the strategic function of adverbs like in fact and frankly when used to qualify the utterance that functions as a standpoint in an argumentative discussion. The aim is to provide a description of their strategic function that takes into consideration the role that the move of advancing a standpoint plays in argumentative discourse. To this direction, the choice of qualifying is explained as a choice that the arguer makes in his attempt to manage the burden of proof that is incurred when advancing a standpoint. By combining the insights from the pragma-linguistic treatment of these adverbs with the theoretical premises of a systematic approach to the analysis of argumentative discourse it becomes possible to specify their strategic function and to evaluate those cases in which this strategic function has been abused to the detriment of the quality of argumentative discourse.

  • Sataøen, Hogne L.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Regulokratene: Den nye styringsprofesjonen?2018In: Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift, ISSN 1590-7929, E-ISSN 1936-4660, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 481-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What characterizes the regulocrats within the higher education sector in Norway andSweden? How can the regulocrats’ role be related to the development of specific instituti-onal designs within the higher education sector? These questions are answered by meansof empirical studies of regulocrats in Norway and Sweden, within the field of higher edu-cation regulation. The regulocrats are an emerging profession working in autonomoussingle purpose regulatory agencies. The profession is increasingly important to the imp-lementation of policy and regulation. There is surprisingly little empirical evidence aboutthis professional role, and the article shows that the professionalization of the regulocratsis related to the ideal of independence. The emerging profession contributes to the insti-tutional design of regulocracy or regulatory capitalism, which implies a transformation ofthe classical bureaucracy in the modern administrative state, where all (both organizations,groups and individuals) are expected to invest more in regulation, understood as monito-ring, supervision, transparency and control. Within the higher education sector, regulati-ons are perceived as important because they benefit (the individual) students and creategood conditions for making rational choices in the education market. Although the regu-locrats in Norway and Sweden share much of the same professional ideals, there are alsodifferences between the two countries. Where the Swedish regulocrats are formalistic, theNorwegian counterpart is sensitive.

  • Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Healthying physical education: on the possibility of learning health2019In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As part of the annual activities at the British Educational Research Association (BERA) conference, the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Special Interest Group (SIG) organises a so-called Invisible College, where a Scholar Lecture is delivered by a researcher who has made a significant contribution to the field. This paper is the 2018 Scholar Lecture.

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to discuss two concepts and the relations between them – health and learning.

    Key concepts: In the paper, the metaphor of the swimmer in the river, as introduced by Antonovsky, is used in order to go beyond individualistic, dualistic and instrumental notions of health and education. I argue for a move away from a notion of teaching young people how to be healthy through the deployment of ready-made educational packages, towards acknowledging health education as a societal responsibility, where it is recognised that sociocultural and economic contexts afford diverse opportunities to be healthy and to learn to live healthy lives, however these are construed.

    Discussion and conclusion: Rather than confining health and health education to the prevention of premature death and disease, I discuss health, in relation to learning, as always being in the process of becoming. The health resources for living a good life can then be found in the ‘river’, with the ‘swimmer’, and in the relation between the ‘river’ and the ‘swimmer’. In this way, health can manifest itself in many different ways. I ask why we even attempt to talk about health in the singular when talking about different diseases. Is health rather a plural? Is it even a noun? Or is it something we do – a verb? If the latter, health education can be conceived of as a practice – ‘healthying’ – rather than a fixed, static outcome set up by research and public health policies as something to achieve in education.

  • Roderick, Noah
    After Universal Grammar: The Ecological Turn in Linguistics2012In: Logos & Episteme: an International Journal of Epistemology, ISSN 2069-0533, E-ISSN 2069-3052, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 469-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of all the human sciences, linguistics has had perhaps the most success in pivoting itself towards the physical sciences, particularly in the past fifty years with the dominance of Universal Grammar, which is most closely associated with the work of Noam Chomsky. One of the most important implications of Universal Grammar has been that language production in its most natural and optimal state is organized analytically, and thus shares the same organizational logic of other knowledge systems in Western science, such as the binomial taxonomization of nature and analytic geometry. This essay argues that recent challenges to Universal Grammar represent more than just a theoretical dispute within a single discipline; they threaten to undermine the hegemony of analytical knowledge systems in general. While analytical logic has served Western science well, analogical knowledge systems may be able to address problems that analytical logic cannot, such as ecological crises, the limitations of artificial intelligence, and the problems of complex systems. Instead of studying languages as a means of modeling human thought in general, languages should also be studied and preserved as heteronomous knowledge systems which themselves exist as embodied objects within particular ecologies. Rethinking language as existing on a univocal plane with other ecological objects will provide us with new insight on the ethics and epistemology of analogical knowledge production.

  • Roderick, Noah
    Lourdes University, Sylvania, OH, USA.
    The Being of Analogy2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similarity has long been excluded from reality in both the analytical and continental traditions. Because it exists in the aesthetic realm, and because aesthetics is thought to be divorced from objective reality, similarity has been confined to the prison of the subject. In The Being of Analogy, Noah Roderick unleashes similarity onto the world of objects. Inspired by object-oriented theories of causality, Roderick argues that similarity is ever present at the birth of new objects. This includes the emergent similarity of new mental objects, such as categories—a phenomenon we recognize as analogy. Analogy, Roderick contends, is at the very heart of cognition and communication, and it is through analogy that we can begin dismantling the impossible wall between knowing and being.

  • Brolin, Magnus
    et al.
    aSchool of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro Univerity, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    bSchool of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Casey, Ashley
    cSchool of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    A salutogenic strengths-based approach in practice: an illustration from a school in Sweden2018In: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an extensive debate and an openness of teachers to a strength-based approach to health and physical education, it is not always clear what a salutogenic strengths-based approach might look like in practice, at least not in the day-to-day work in schools. The purpose of this article is to present a salutogenic strengths-based school initiative in Sweden and to identify health discourses in the school's practice. An insider perspective is used to explore health in the school through Brookfield's four lenses for exploring one's own teaching practice. Two health discourses are identified: (1) an individual health discourse rooted in the fostering of personal development, and (2) a value-based health discourse build up around social relations and the fostering of democratic values. The individual health discourse can be understood as based in a pathogenic norm, and in the investigated school practice the individual health discourse dominated the school health initiative despite the salutogenic intentions.

  • Huang, Lihong
    et al.
    NOVA, OsloMet – storbyuniversitetet, Oslo, Norway.
    Bruun, Jens
    Aarhus universitet, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Lieberkind, Jonas
    Aarhus universitet, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Arensmeier, Cecilia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nye tall om ungdom: Skandinaviske ungdommers tillit til samtid og framtid2018In: Tidsskrift for ungdomsforskning, E-ISSN 1894-1036, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 146-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust in the contemporary society and future projections among Scandinavian youth Using data from the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study, ICCS 2016, the article compares the views of 14-year-olds in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. We analyze and compare young people’s trust in political and social institutions and in people in general, as well as the young people’s views on threats and challenges for their future. The presentation of results is mainly descriptive with the attention to show similarities and differences among Scandinavian youths and in comparison with young people in other parts of the world. The level of general trust in other people has declined in all three countries since ICCS 2009. Compared to other countries, Scandinavian adolescents express greater trust in institutions, lower concern for threats of different kinds and greater optimism about their own future. High-trusting youths are the most optimistic about their own future, but they are on the other hand in some respects more worried about future threats.

  • Karni, Liran
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    EMPARK: Internet of Things for Empowerment and Improved Treatment of Patients with Parkinson's Disease2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to assess the effects of patient-directed feedback from remote symptom, medication, and disease activity monitoring on patient empowerment and treatment in Parkinson’s disease (PD).

    Background: There is a need to empower patients with PD to be able to understand better and control their disease using prescribed medication and following recommendations on lifestyle. The research project EMPARK will develop an Internet of Things system of sensors, mobile devices to deliver real-time, 24/7 patient symptom information with the primary goal to support PD patients empowerment and better understanding of their disease. The system will be deployed in patient homes to continuously measure movements, time-in-bed and drug delivery from a micro-dose levodopa system. Subjective symptom scoring, time of meals and physical activities will be reported by the patients via a smartphone application. Interfaces for patients and clinicians are being developed based on the user center design methodology to ensure maximal user acceptance. 

    Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial where 30 PD patients from 2 university clinics in Sweden will be randomized to receive (intervention group) or not (control group) continuous feedback from the results of the EMPARK home monitoring for 2 weeks. Disease-specific (UPDRS, PDQ-39), Quality of Life (QoL) (modified EuroQoL EQ-5D) and empowerment questionnaires will be collected prior and after the intervention. The correlation of technology-based objective and patient-reported subjective parameters will be assessed in both groups. Interviews will be conducted with the clinicians and observations will be made about the patient-clinician interaction to assess the potential treatment benefits of the intervention.

    Results: Preliminary results from workshops with patients and clinicians show potential to improve patient empowerment and disease control among patients. Completion of the trial will show the degree of patient empowerment, individualized treatment, and patientclinician interactions.

    Conclusions: Raising patients’ awareness about disease activity and home medication is possible among PD patients by providing them with feedback from the results of a home monitoring system. This randomized, controlled trial aims to provide evidence that this approach leads to improved patient empowerment and treatment results.

  • Aghanavesi, Somayeh
    et al.
    Computer Engineering, School of Technology and Business Studies, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Filip, Bergquist
    Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenbrug, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Dept. of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Senek, Marina
    Dept. of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Feasibility of a multi-sensor data fusion method for assessment of Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Title: Feasibility of a multi-sensor data fusion method for assessment of Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of measuring Parkinson’s disease (PD) motor symptoms with a multi-sensor data fusion method. More specifically, the aim is to assess validity, reliability and sensitivity to treatment of the methods.

    Background: Data from 19 advanced PD patients (Gender: 14 males and 5 females, mean age: 71.4, mean years with PD: 9.7, mean years with levodopa: 9.5) were collected in a single center, open label, single dose clinical trial in Sweden [1].

    Methods: The patients performed leg agility and 2-5 meter straight walking tests while wearing motion sensors on their limbs. They performed the tests at baseline, at the time they received the morning dose, and at pre-specified time points until the medication wore off. While performing the tests the patients were video recorded. The videos were observed by three movement disorder specialists who rated the symptoms using a treatment response scale (TRS), ranging from -3 (very off) to 3 (very dyskinetic). The sensor data consisted of lower limb data during leg agility, upper limb data during walking, and lower limb data during walking. Time series analysis was performed on the raw sensor data extracted from 17 patients to derive a set of quantitative measures, which were then used during machine learning to be mapped to mean ratings of the three raters on the TRS scale. Combinations of data were tested during the machine learning procedure.

    Results: Using data from both tests, the Support Vector Machines (SVM) could predict the motor states of the patients on the TRS scale with a good agreement in relation to the mean ratings of the three raters (correlation coefficient = 0.92, root mean square error = 0.42, p<0.001). Additionally, there was good test-retest reliability of the SVM scores during baseline and second tests with intraclass-correlation coefficient of 0.84. Sensitivity to treatment for SVM was good (Figure 1), indicating its ability to detect changes in motor symptoms. The upper limb data during walking was more informative than lower limb data during walking since SVMs had higher correlation coefficient to mean ratings.  

    Conclusions: The methodology demonstrates good validity, reliability, and sensitivity to treatment. This indicates that it could be useful for individualized optimization of treatments among PD patients, leading to an improvement in health-related quality of life.

  • Aghanavesi, Somayeh
    et al.
    Computer Engineering, School of Technology and Business Studies, Borlänge, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Filip
    Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Dept. of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Senek, Marina
    Dept. of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Objective assessment of Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms during leg agility test using motion sensors2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Title: Objective assessment of Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms during leg agility test using motion sensors

    Objective: To develop and evaluate machine learning methods for assessment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) motor symptoms using leg agility (LA) data collected with motion sensors during a single dose experiment.

    Background: Nineteen advanced PD patients (Gender: 14 males and 5 females, mean age: 71.4, mean years with PD: 9.7, mean years with levodopa: 9.5) were recruited in a single center, open label, single dose clinical trial in Sweden [1].

    Methods: The patients performed up to 15 LA tasks while wearing motions sensors on their foot ankle. They performed tests at pre-defined time points starting from baseline, at the time they received a morning dose (150% of their levodopa equivalent morning dose), and at follow-up time points until the medication wore off. The patients were video recorded while performing the motor tasks. and three movement disorder experts rated the observed motor symptoms using 4 items from the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor section including UPDRS #26 (leg agility), UPDRS #27 (Arising from chair), UPDRS #29 (Gait), UPDRS #31 (Body Bradykinesia and Hypokinesia), and dyskinesia scale. In addition, they rated the overall mobility of the patients using Treatment Response Scale (TRS), ranging from -3 (very off) to 3 (very dyskinetic). Sensors data were processed and their quantitative measures were used to develop machine learning methods, which mapped them to the mean ratings of the three raters. The quality of measurements of the machine learning methods was assessed by convergence validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to treatment.

    Results: Results from the 10-fold cross validation showed good convergent validity of the machine learning methods (Support Vector Machines, SVM) with correlation coefficients of 0.81 for TRS, 0.78 for UPDRS #26, 0.69 for UPDRS #27, 0.78 for UPDRS #29, 0.83 for UPDRS #31, and 0.67 for dyskinesia scale (P<0.001). There were good correlations between scores produced by the methods during the first (baseline) and second tests with coefficients ranging from 0.58 to 0.96, indicating good test-retest reliability. The machine learning methods had lower sensitivity than mean clinical ratings (Figure. 1).

    Conclusions: The presented methodology was able to assess motor symptoms in PD well, comparable to movement disorder experts. The leg agility test did not reflect treatment related changes.

  • Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Science and Technology Studies in the Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Environmental Expertise as Group Belonging: Environmental Sociology Meets Science and Technology Studies2018In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 309-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is environmental expertise? The background to this question is that many scholars consider environmental expertise crucial for discovering, diagnosing, and solving environmental problems but do not discuss in any depth what constitutes expertise. By investigating the meaning and use of the concept of expertise in three general theories within environmental sociology—the treadmill of production, risk society, and ecological modernization—and findings from science and technology studies (STS), this article develops a sociological understanding of environmental expertise: what it is and how it is acquired. Environmental expertise is namely about group belonging and professional socialization around specialized skills; that is, it concerns both substantial competence and social recognition. The implications of this general view on expertise are then used to enrich theories in environmental sociology.

  • Hege, Inga
    et al.
    Institute for Medical Education, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany; Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Kononowicz, Andrzej A.
    Department of Bioinformatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; Department of Learning, Informatics Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tolks, Daniel
    Institute for Medical Education, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Department of Learning, Informatics Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kuehlmeyer, Katja
    Institute for Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany.
    A qualitative analysis of virtual patient descriptions in healthcare education based on a systematic literature review2016In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, article id 146Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Virtual Patients (VPs) have been in the focus of research in healthcare education for many years. The aim of our study was to analyze how virtual patients are described in the healthcare education literature, and how the identified concepts relate to each other.

    Methods: We performed a literature review and extracted 185 descriptions of virtual patients from the articles. In a qualitative content analysis approach we inductively-deductively developed categories and deducted subcategories. We constructed a concept map to illustrate these concepts and their interrelations.

    Results: We developed the following five main categories: Patient, Teacher, Virtual Patient, Curriculum, and Learner. The concept map includes these categories and highlights aspects such as the under-valued role of patients in shaping their virtual representation and opposing concepts, such as standardization of learner activity versus learner-centeredness.

    Conclusions: The presented concept map synthesizes VP descriptions and serves as a basis for both, VP use and discussions of research topics related to virtual patients.

  • Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Debriefing practices in interprofessional simulation with students: A sociomaterial perspective2016In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, article id 148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The debriefing phase is an important feature of simulation activities for learning. This study applies a sociomaterial perspective on debriefing in interprofessional simulation with medical and nursing students. Sociomaterial perspectives are increasingly being used in order to understand professional practice and learning in new ways, conceptualising professional practice as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial relations. The aim of the study is to explore how debriefing is carried out as a practice supporting students’ interprofessional learning.

    Methods: Eighteen debriefing sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulation with nursing and medical students from two different universities were video-recorded and analysed collaboratively by a team of researchers, applying a structured scheme for constant comparative analysis.

    Results: The findings show how debriefing is intertwined with, and shaped by social and material relationships. Two patterns of enacting debriefing emerged. Debriefing as algorithm was enacted as a protocol-based, closed inquiry approach. Debriefing as laissez-faire was enacted as a loosely structured collegial conversation with an open inquiry approach.

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that neither an imposed structure of the debriefing, nor the lack of structure assured interprofessional collaboration to emerge as a salient topic for reflection, even though that was an explicit learning objective for the simulation. 

  • Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine, unit of Medical Education, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Rolf
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dynamics of study strategies and teacher regulation in virtual patient learning activities: a cross sectional survey2016In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students’ self-regulated learning becomes essential with increased use of exploratory web-based activities such as virtual patients (VPs). The purpose was to investigate the interplay between students’ self-regulated learning strategies and perceived benefit in VP learning activities.

    Method: A cross-sectional study (n = 150) comparing students’ study strategies and perceived benefit of a virtual patient learning activity in a clinical clerkship preparatory course. Teacher regulation varied among three settings and was classified from shared to strong. These settings were compared regarding their respective relations between regulation strategies and perceived benefit of the virtual patient activity.

    Results: Self-regulation learning strategy was generally associated with perceived benefit of the VP activities (rho 0.27, p < 0.001), but was not true in all settings. The association was higher in the two strongly regulated settings. The external regulation strategy did generally associate weakly with perceived benefit (rho 0.17, p < 0.05) with large variations between settings.

    Conclusions:  The flexible student-autonomous appeal of virtual patients should not lead to the dismissal of guidance and related course activities. External teacher and peer regulation seem to be productive for increasing learners’ perceived benefit. Awareness of the interplay among teacher regulation (external) and various study strategies can increase the value of flexible web-based learning resources to students.

  • Kononowicz, Andrzej A.
    et al.
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Bioinformatics and Telemedicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.
    Woodham, Luke
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St George’s, University of London, London, UK.
    Georg, Carina
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Stathakarou, Natalia
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Davies, David
    Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Warwick, UK.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saxena, Nakul
    Health Services and Outcomes Research (HSOR), National Healthcare Group, Singapore, Singapore.
    Tudor Car, Lorainne
    Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Car, Josip
    Health Services and Outcomes Research Programme, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore; Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Zary, Nabil
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Mohammed VI University of Health Sciences, Casablanca, Morocco; Medical Education Research and Scholarship Unit, Lee Kong Chian Sch ool of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.
    Virtual patient simulations for health professional education2016In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 5, article id CD012194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of virtual patient simulation as an educational intervention versus traditional learning, other types of e-Learning interventions and other forms of virtual patient simulation interventions for delivering pre-registration and post-registration healthcare professional education. We will primarily assess the impact of these interventions on learners knowledge, skills and attitudes. Our secondary objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions.

  • Escher, Cecilia
    et al.
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Hans
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Creutzfeldt, Johan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meurling, Lisbet
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Department of Behavior Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    6Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordahl Amorøe, Torben
    Simulator Centre West, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Method matters: impact of in-scenario instruction on simulation-based teamwork training2017In: Advances in Science and Technology Research Journal, ISSN 2364-3277, E-ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 2, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The rationale for introducing full-scale patient simulators in training to improve patient safety is to recreate clinical situations in a realistic setting. Although high-fidelity simulators mimic a wide range of human features, simulators differ from the body of a sick patient. The gap between the simulator and the human body implies a need for facilitators to provide information to help participants understand scenarios. The authors aimed at describing different methods that facilitators in our dataset used to provide such extra scenario information and how the different methods to convey information affected how scenarios played out.

    Methods:  A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to examine the variation of methods to deliver extra scenario information to participants. A multistage approach was employed. The authors selected film clips from a shared database of 31 scenarios from three participating simulation centers. A multidisciplinary research team performed a collaborative analysis of representative film clips focusing on the interplay between participants, facilitators, and the physical environment. After that, the entire material was revisited to further examine and elaborate the initial findings.

    Results: The material displayed four distinct methods for facilitators to convey information to participants in simulation-based teamwork training. The choice of method had impact on the participating teams regarding flow of work, pace, and team communication. Facilitators’ close access to the teams’ activities when present in the simulation suite, either embodied or disembodied in the simulation, facilitated the timing for providing information, which was critical for maintaining the flow of activities in the scenario. The mediation of information by a loudspeaker or an earpiece from the adjacent operator room could be disturbing for team communication.

    Conclusions:  In-scenario instruction is an essential component of simulation-based teamwork training that has been largely overlooked in previous research. The ways in which facilitators convey information about the simulated patient have the potential to shape the simulation activities and thereby serve different learning goals. Although immediate timing to maintain an adequate pace is necessary for professionals to engage in training of medical emergencies, novices may gain from a slower tempo to train complex clinical team tasks systematically.

  • Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin, Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Linköpings universitet, Linköping,.
    Meyer, Frida
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
    Tamás, Éva
    Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin, Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
    Utvärdering av IPL-simulering på Clinicum: Simuleringsdag ”Akuta situationer” för sistaårsstudenter från sjuksköterske- och läkarprogrammen HT 20162017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En gemensam simuleringsdag för sjuksköterske- och läkarstudenter har utvärderats och diskuteras här i relation till interprofessionellt lärande och simuleringsbaserat lärande.

    IPL-simuleringen kännetecknas av ett starkt studentengagemang och upplevs som mycket relevant och kliniskt autentisk. Den simuleringsbaserade satsningen är alltså fortsatt aktuell och har utvecklats till en hög nivå med relevans för lärande och klinisk förberedelse. Innehållet rör såväl kliniska som team­relaterade kunskaper och kompetenser. Simulering som undervisningsform uppskattas högt och simulerings­instruktörens bidrag till lärandet lyfts fram. Ambitionsnivån kan ytterligare höjas på några punkter. Kurskamraternas bidrag i lärandet kan ytterligare stärkas, likaså omvårdnads­innehållet i scenarierna.

    IPL-mål adresseras i aktiviteten, i synnerhet ökar teamsamverkan progressivt under dagen. Det inter­professionella lärandet kan stärkas ännu mer  genom att linjera tydligare med övriga IPL-moment samt knyta an till de uttalade IPL-curriculum-målen.

  • Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Edstrom, Desiree Wiegleb
    Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Characteristics of two questionnaires used to assess interprofessional learning: psychometrics and expert panel evaluations2018In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 18, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interprofessional learning activities are included in many curricula but are difficult to assess. For languages that are not widely spoken such as Swedish, few validated questionnaires exist that relate to interprofessional outcomes. Therefore, the aim was to examine two such questionnaires in relation to interprofessional competence domains.

    Methods: Psychometric characteristics, such as homogeneity of items and internal consistency, were assessed for the Swedish versions of the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Towards Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). The questionnaires were distributed directly following IPL activities. Mokken scale analysis based on Loevingers coefficient for homogeneity and Cronbachs alpha were used to evaluate the scales. Two expert panels performed a qualitative analysis of items in relation to four internationally defined interprofessional competences.

    Results: In total, 88 and 84 responded to the JSAPNC and RIPLS questionnaires, respectively. Estimates of homogeneity were low for both the JSAPNC (H = 0.16) and the RIPLS (H = 0.21). Reliabilities were weak (0.62 and 0.66, respectively) for the total scales. The expert panels categorised 68% of items into similar competence domains. However, their discussion revealed ambiguous wordings and imbalances in the two questionnaires in relation to domains.

    Conclusion: Interprofessional competence domains are defined but few validated tools exist to assess them. Examined tools relating to interprofessional learning in Swedish do not qualify for assessing overarching IPL outcomes, and summed scores from these tools should be used with caution.

  • Lodefalk, Magnus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Ratio.
    Behovet av en ny handelspolitik2017In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • Lodefalk, Magnus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Ratio.
    Den trumpska hästen2018In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • Persson, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Indoor air quality and chemical emissions of organic compounds in newly built low-energy preschools2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the European Union (EU) introduced the “Energy performance of Buildings” directive, which stipulates that all new buildings must reduce their energy consumption by constructing low-energy buildings. This could be achieved by constructing airtight and energy efficient envelopes with functional building materials such as age-resistant plastic films, insulation and different sealing products. However, functional building materials are known to contain a large amount of man-made chemicals that could be released to the indoor environment and might cause health issues among the occupants. In view of this, the indoor air quality (IAQ) and contamination of selected organic compounds were investigated in newly built low-energy preschools in order to evaluate whether the new building concept, low-energy housing, can have a negative effect to the indoor environment and the occupants. The IAQ was satisfactory in all preschools and the indoor air chemical mixture was heavily influenced by the mechanical heat recovery ventilation system. Furthermore, the levels of formaldehyde, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) were lower in the environmental certified low-energy preschools compared to those preschools without environmental certification. Thus, a conscious choice of building materials, interior decoration and chemical products can reduce the occurrence and levels of hazardous organic compounds. Emission tests showed that collected building materials only contributed to a small fraction of the measured indoor chemical levels. Furthermore, preliminary exposure risk estimation of the indoor chemical mixture showed potential health risk from some individual compounds to the occupants, but further investigations are needed for a more complete risk assessment. In conclusion, the comprehensive and unique study design presented in this thesis will contribute to the ongoing work towards a non-toxic environment, further development of the low-energy building concept and the legislative movement on limit values for chemical emissions from building materials.

    List of papers
    1. Indoor air quality of newly built low-energy preschools: Are chemical emissions reduced in houses with eco-labelled building materials?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indoor air quality of newly built low-energy preschools: Are chemical emissions reduced in houses with eco-labelled building materials?
    2018 (English)In: Indoor and Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    The use of an airtight frame in low-energy buildings could increase the risk of health-related problems, such as allergies and sick building syndromes (SBS), associated with chemical emissions from building materials, especially if the ventilation system is not functioning properly. In this study, the indoor air quality (IAQ) was investigated in newly built low-energy and conventional preschools by monitoring the indoor air temperature, relative humidity, particle-size distribution and levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC). The thermal comfort was satisfactory in all preschools, with average indoor air temperature and a relative humidity at 21.4C and 36%, respectively. The highest levels of TVOC (range: 130–1650 mg/m3 toluene equivalents) and formaldehyde (range: 1.9–28.8 mg/m3) occurred during the first sampling period associated with strong emissions from building materials. However, those preschools constructed with environmental friendly building materials (such as Swan Eco-label) had lower initial TVOC levels compared to those preschools constructed with conventional building materials. The IAQ and indoor chemical emissions were also strongly dependent on the functioning of the ventilation system. Preliminary risk assessment indicated that exposure to acrolein and crotonaldehyde might lead to respiratory-tract irritation among occupants.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2018
    Keywords
    Indoor air quality, Low-energy preschool, Ventilation, Indoor air pollutants, Temporal trends, Maximum cumulative ratio, Volatile organic compounds
    National Category
    Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70261 (URN)10.1177/1420326X18792600 (DOI)
    Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Temporal trends of decabromodiphenyl ether and emerging brominated flame retardants in dust, air and window surfaces of newly built low-energy preschools
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal trends of decabromodiphenyl ether and emerging brominated flame retardants in dust, air and window surfaces of newly built low-energy preschools
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70262 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in indoor dust, air and window wipes in newly built low-energy preschools
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in indoor dust, air and window wipes in newly built low-energy preschools
    2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 628-629, p. 159-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of extremely airtight and energy efficient low-energy buildings is achieved by using functional building materials, such as age-resistant plastics, insulation, adhesives, and sealants. Additives such as organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) can be added to some of these building materials as flame retardants and plasticizers. Some OPFRs are considered persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Therefore, in this pilot study, the occurrence and distribution of nine OPFRs were determined for dust, air, and window wipe samples collected in newly built low-energy preschools with and without environmental certifications. Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were detected in all indoor dust samples at concentrations ranging from 0.014 to 10 μg/g and 0.0069 to 79 μg/g, respectively. Only six OPFRs (predominantly chlorinated OPFRs) were detected in the indoor air. All nine OPFRs were found on the window surfaces and the highest concentrations, which occurred in the reference preschool, were measured for 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP) (maximum concentration: 1500 ng/m2). Interestingly, the OPFR levels in the environmental certified low-energy preschools were lower than those in the reference preschool and the non-certified low-energy preschool, probably attributed to the usage of environmental friendly and low-emitting building materials, interior decorations, and consumer products.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Organophosphate flame retardant, Plasticizer, Low-energy preschool, Environmental certified building, Indoor dust, Surface wipe
    National Category
    Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Environmental Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65565 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.053 (DOI)000432462000018 ()29432927 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041523162 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Healthy Building Forum (HBF)

    Örebro University

    Department of Occupational and Environ-mental Medicine at Örebro University Hospital

    Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Chemical emissions from building materials used in low-energy constructions and their presence in the indoor air
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical emissions from building materials used in low-energy constructions and their presence in the indoor air
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70263 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
  • Singleton, Benedict
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Science, red in tooth and claw: Whaling, purity, pollution and institutions in marine mammal scientists' boundary work2018In: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, ISSN 2514-8486, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 165-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of lethal research methods on cetaceans has a long and complicated history in cetology (the scientific study of whales, dolphins and porpoises). In the current era, collecting data through the hunting of whales (sometimes referred to as scientific whaling) remains a source of considerable conflict in various fora, including scientific ones. Based on interviews and documents, this article explores how marine mammal scientists articulate the validity of particular practices and research at both the International Whaling Commission and in professional scientific societies. Drawing on cultural theory, the article explores scientists’ boundary work, describing the purity and pollution of particular whaling practices in different institutional contexts. Respondents on either side of the debate argued for the pure or polluted nature of various positions, often utilising particular idealised values of science: objectivity, honesty and openness regarding how conclusions were drawn. The nature of boundary work performed is then related to the institutional context within which it takes place. This article thus highlights how science’s role in environmental conflicts can be assessed through boundary work that denotes who can legitimately speak for science, on what topics and how science is stage-managed.

  • Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sjödin, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Unintended consequences and risk(y) thinking: The shaping of consequences and responsibilities in relation to environmental disasters2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unintended consequences have long been central for the social sciences. But, the development of risk analysis and the adoption of risk language have substantial implications for how to understand and evaluate unintended consequences. Claims can now be raised that unintended consequences should have been foreseen and other options chosen. This situation constitutes the starting point for this paper, which develops an understanding of unintended consequences, in particular, in relation to environmental disasters. It draws on Robert Merton's classic work on unanticipated consequences, but refines and further develops it by fertilizing it with findings from risk sociology and framing theory. A particular case of a human-caused disaster, a severewildfire, is analyzed to illustrate and expand the understanding of unintended consequences. The empirical material consists of a postal survey to everyone directly affected by the wildfire (N = 960 individuals). The empirical results of this analysis are then explained and used to improve the understanding of unintended consequences, by showing how the context and framing of the disaster heavily affected the evaluation of its consequences, including unintended ones.

  • Klapwijk, M. J.
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boberg, J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergh, J.
    Linnaeus University, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology, Växsjö, Sweden.
    Bishop, K.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources and Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björkman, C.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ellison, D.
    Ellison Consulting, Baar, Switzerland; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Resource Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Felton, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, T.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Keskitalo, E. C. H.
    Umeå University, Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sonesson, J.
    Skogforsk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordström, E. -M
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Resource Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stenlid, J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mårald, E.
    Umeå University, Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Capturing complexity: Forests, decision-making and climate change mitigation action2018In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 52, p. 238-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managed forests can play an important role in climate change mitigation due to their capacity to sequester carbon. However, it has proven difficult to harness their full potential for climate change mitigation. Managed forests are often referred to as socio-ecological systems as the human dimension is an integral part of the system. When attempting to change systems that are influenced by factors such as collective knowledge, social organization, understanding of the situation and values represented in society, initial intentions often shift due to the complexity of political, social and scientific interactions. Currently, the scientific literature is dispersed over the different factors related to the socio-ecological system. To examine the level of dispersion and to obtain a holistic view, we review climate change mitigation in the context of Swedish forest research. We introduce a heuristic framework to understand decision-making connected to climate change mitigation. We apply our framework to two themes which span different dimensions in the socio-ecological system: carbon accounting and bioenergy. A key finding in the literature was the perception that current uncertainties regarding the reliability of different methods of carbon accounting inhibits international agreement on the use of forests for climate change mitigation. This feeds into a strategic obstacle affecting the willingness of individual countries to implement forest-related carbon emission reduction policies. Decisions on the utilization of forests for bioenergy are impeded by a lack of knowledge regarding the resultant biophysical and social consequences. This interacts negatively with the development of institutional incentives regarding the production of bioenergy using forest products. Normative disagreement about acceptable forest use further affects these scientific discussions and therefore is an over-arching influence on decision-making. With our framework, we capture this complexity and make obstacles to decision-making more transparent to enable their more effective resolution. We have identified the main research areas concerned with the use of managed forest in climate change mitigation and the obstacles that are connected to decision making.