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Georgii-Hemming, EvaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3758-7541
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Larsson, C. & Georgii-Hemming, E. (2019). Improvisation in General Music Education: A literature review. British Journal of Music Education, 36(1), 49-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvisation in General Music Education: A literature review
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0265-0517, E-ISSN 1469-2104, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 49-67Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall purpose of this article is to provide a convenient summary of empirical research on improvisation in general music education and thereby provide guidance to researchers and practitioners, using a systematic, narrative-review approach. By analysing 20 music education research articles, published from 2000–2015 in peer-reviewed journals,we firstly provide an overview of the key features and knowledge of existing research. Secondly we identify how improvisation has been characterized, conceptually before, thirdly, describing the implications of the literature for improvisation in practice. Our article reveals that improvisation tends to be an overlooked activity both in music education contexts and in music education research. Broadly speaking, music education research tends to characterise improvisation within two conceptual frameworks, which have different implications for implementation; ‘structured’, teacher-directed improvisation and ‘free’, child-directed improvisation. We conclude by arguing that music educational research on improvisation is an underdeveloped field and outline a number of questions to be addressed in future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2019
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52882 (URN)10.1017/S026505171800013X (DOI)000466759900005 ()2-s2.0-85048884464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-10 Created: 2016-10-10 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Moberg, N. & Georgii-Hemming, E. (2019). Musicianship: Discursive constructions of autonomy and independence within music performance programmes. In: Stefan Gies & Jon Helge Sætre (Ed.), Becoming musicians: Student involvement and teacher collaboration in higher music education (pp. 67-88). Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musicianship: Discursive constructions of autonomy and independence within music performance programmes
2019 (English)In: Becoming musicians: Student involvement and teacher collaboration in higher music education / [ed] Stefan Gies & Jon Helge Sætre, Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole , 2019, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Autonomy and independence are key concepts within higher education. Skills and competences viewed as necessary for a flexible and life-long career have become increasingly centred on employability and demands for market adjustment. This article addresses the issue of how autonomy and independence are understood within a specific disciplinary context. Drawing on interviews with teachers and students, the paper aims to investigate discursive constructions of autonomy and independence within music performance programs in higher education. We identify that autonomy is articulated primarily as actions of expression and communication, both musically and linguistically. Independence is primarily articulated as a detachment from teachers, as well as independence from prior musical interpretations and sheet music. On the basis of the findings, we argue that autonomy and independence by and large involve an alignment to current societal and market conditions which suggests a rather limited latitude in possible actions and positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole, 2019
Series
NMH-publikasjoner, ISSN 0333-3760, E-ISSN 2535-373X ; 7
Keywords
Higher music education, music performance programmes, musicianship, discursive constructions, autonomy, music and market
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology esp. Musical Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79219 (URN)978-82-7853-271-3 (ISBN)978-82-7853-273-7 (ISBN)
Projects
Konstnär eller Forskare? Tradition eller innovation? Om musikerutbildning i förändring.
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0255:1
Available from: 2020-01-17 Created: 2020-01-17 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Angelo, E., Varkøy, Ø. & Georgii-Hemming, E. (2019). Notions of Mandate, Knowledge and Research in Norwegian Classical Music Performance Studies. Journal for Reserach in Arts and Sports Education, 3(1), 78-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Notions of Mandate, Knowledge and Research in Norwegian Classical Music Performance Studies
2019 (English)In: Journal for Reserach in Arts and Sports Education, E-ISSN 2535-2857, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 78-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Policy changes and higher education reforms challenge performing musician programmes across Europe. The academisation of arts education means that classical performance programmes are now marked by strong expectations of research paths, publications, and the standardisation of courses, grades and positions. Drawing on interviews with ten teachers and leaders within the field of higher music education, this article discusses notions of mandate, knowledge and research in classical performance music education in Norway. Against the backdrop of academisation, the aim of this article is to illuminate central tensions and negotiations concerning mandate, knowledge and research within higher music education. The problem concerns issues of who should be judged as qualified and who should have the authority to speak on behalf of the performing music expertise community. The study is part of the larger study Discourses of Academisation and the Music Profession in Higher Music Education (DAPHME), conducted by a team of senior researchers in Sweden, Norway and Germany. Through an analytic-theoretical reading of the empirical data, informed by Foucault’s power/knowledge concept, two discourses on mandate are identified (the awakening discourse and the Bildung discourse) as well as three discourses on knowledge (the handicraft discourse, the entrepreneurship discourse and the discourse of critical reflection) and two discourses on research (the collaborative discourse and the ‘perforesearch’ discourse). The latter of the two research discourses pinpoints a subject position as a musician/researcher with knowledge, craft and skills in both music performing and research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo, Norway: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2019
Keywords
Higher music education, academisation, performing arts programmes and research, artistic research/developmental work, discourse theory, power/knowledge
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology esp. Musical Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76022 (URN)10.23865/jased.v3.1284 (DOI)
Projects
Konstnär eller forskare? Tradition eller innovation? Om musikerutbildning i förändring (DAPHME)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0255:1
Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Georgii-Hemming, E. & Johansson, K. (2019). Reflection, artistic research and higher music education. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Conference of Nordic Network for Research in Music Education (NNMPF 2019), Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden, February 26-28, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflection, artistic research and higher music education
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Music performance programmes and higher music education (HME) in Europe are currently in a phase of change. Until the 21stcentury, the higher education of instrumental musicians and composers has been framed by fairly stable conceptions of craftsmanship and artistic skill, and by straight-forward connections with the professional field. Today, however, the future is unclear.Changing conditions for employability and processes of academization are challenging traditional notions of knowledge and competence in the expert culture. 

The DAPHME project (Discourses of Academization and Professionalisation in Higher Music Education)[1] explores contrasting perspectives on performing musicians’ expertise and societal mandate in Sweden, Norway and Germany. Data are gathered through official documents and interviews with institutional leaders and teachers in HME. The concept of academization can be understood as the process of placing art into a university system and an academic discourse. Following this, fundamental ideas about artistic competence, knowledge and research are challenged and conflicts are likely to arise. In order to grasp and make visible such tensions, the DAPHME project employs a methodology inspired by critical discourse studies.

In the context of results from the Swedish part study, that comprises seventeen leaders and teachers at four academies of music, this senior research paper discusses the development of HME from two perspectives: a) the articulation and negotiation of ‘reflection’ as part of the education of performing musicians and the music profession, b) the role of artistic research in the process of transforming traditional conservatoires into institutions of education and research.

Reflection, and more specifically critical reflection, is often pointed out as contributing to successful lifelong learning. Reflective practice is seen as a method for professional growth and lasting learning outcomes, but what this implies in the context of HME has not been given much attention.  Findings from this study demonstrate how leaders and teachers negotiate interrelated conceptions of reflection; as based on language and cognition; as embodied, and as ‘purely’ musical. These positions relate to views on the content and organisation of teaching in HME, to epistemological questions on how artistic knowledge is formed and transferred and to how reflection is legitimized. 

Following the Bologna process, all higher education programmes are to be research based. In Sweden, artistic research is by now implemented in the university system with an academic degree and governmental funding initiatives. What a research based higher education means in the 1stand 2ndcycle education of musicians is, however, a matter of debate. Findings indicate that ‘artistic research’ is acknowledged as the main way of enquiry and knowledge development in HME but also point to significant negotiations and renegotiations within and between different institutions. As part of this process, the conceptualisation and organisation of the degree project at bachelor and master levels will be discussed as an important tool not only for individual professional learning but for the implementation of institutional profiles and for the future development of HME.

[1]https://www.oru.se/english/research/research-projects/rp/?rdb=p1032

 

National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73050 (URN)
Conference
24th Conference of Nordic Network for Research in Music Education (NNMPF 2019), Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden, February 26-28, 2019
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0255:1
Available from: 2019-03-08 Created: 2019-03-08 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Varkøy, Ø., Georgii-Hemming, E., Kallio, A. & Pio, F. (Eds.). (2018). Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: Årbok 18. Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: Årbok 18
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Nordic Research in Music Education Yearbook has been published since 1997 by the Norwegian Academy of Music. This Volume 18 includes seventeen articles. The themes of the contributions represent a wide variety of interests within the Nordic music education community. The articles “Music, media and technological creativity in the digital age” by Anne Danielsen, and ”Soundscaping the world with digital tools: The future in retrospect” by Göran Folkestad, first were presented as keynotes at the 20th conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education, March 8-10 2016 at Hedmark University College (now: Inland Norway University College of Applied Sciences). The theme for this conference was “Technology and creativity in music education”. The other contributions represent different interests within the community including for instance gender studies, intercultural music practices, musical meaning making, music and body, assessment, practicing, and entrepreneurship. The last section of the Yearbook provides information about Nordic doctoral dissertations in music education from 2016-17, the review panel, and the editorial group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole, 2018. p. 390
Series
Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning, ISSN 1504-5021, E-ISSN 2535-4027 ; 18
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology esp. Musical Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65215 (URN)978-82-7853-240-9 (ISBN)978-82-7853-241-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-25 Created: 2018-02-25 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Rolle, C., Angelo, E. & Georgii-Hemming, E. (2017). Mapping the methodological field of discourse analysis in music education research: A review study, part I. In: Alexander J. Cvetko, Christian Rolle (Ed.), Musikpädagogik und Kulturwissenschaft: Music education and cultural studies: . Paper presented at the 38th Annual Conference of the German Association for Research in Music Education (pp. 153-164). Paper presented at the 38th Annual Conference of the German Association for Research in Music Education. Münster: Waxmann Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping the methodological field of discourse analysis in music education research: A review study, part I
2017 (English)In: Musikpädagogik und Kulturwissenschaft: Music education and cultural studies / [ed] Alexander J. Cvetko, Christian Rolle, Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2017, p. 153-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this article we present early findings of a review study about the use of ’discourse analysis’ in music education research. The review study is part of a research project on discourses of academisation and the music profession in higher music education (DAPHME). ‘Discourse analysis’ and comparable terms label a range of approaches sharing a view upon language as constructing reality as well as being socially constructed. They differ in their theoretical background and with regard to empirical methods. We developed possible categories of comparison and put them to the test by investigating four examples of discourse research in the context of the question: How can the different approaches help to explain the processes of academisation in higher music education.

Abstract [de]

In diesem Beitrag präsentieren wir erste Ergebnisse einer Review-Studie zu diskursanalytischen Herangehensweisen innerhalb der musikpädagogischen Forschung. Die Review-Studie ist Teil eines Forschungsprojektes, das diskursive Prozesse der Akademisierung im Bereich der künstlerischen Ausbildung an Musikhochschulen in verschiedenen Ländern Europas untersucht (DAPHME). Mit ´Diskursanalyse´ und ähnlichen Begriffen werden eine ganze Reihe unterschiedlicher Ansätze bezeichnet, denen gemeinsam ist, dass sie Sprache als etwas verstehen, das Wirklichkeit konstruiert und gleichzeitig selbst gesellschaftlich konstruiert ist. Sie unterscheiden sich im Hinblick auf den theoretischen Hintergrund und empirische Methoden. Um die Ansätze vergleichen zu können, werden mögliche Vergleichskategorien entwickelt und anhand einer Untersuchung von vier verschiedenen Beispielen von Diskursforschung getestet. Die Auswahl der Beispiele orientiert sich an der Frage, welche diskursanalytischen Ansätze sich als Vorbilder für die Erforschung von Prozessen der Akademisierung an Musikhochschulen eignen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2017
Series
Musikpädagogische Forschung / Research in Music Education ; Band 38
Keywords
academisation, discourse analysis, higher music education, methodology, review study
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64769 (URN)9783830936619 (ISBN)
Conference
the 38th Annual Conference of the German Association for Research in Music Education
Projects
DAPHME
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0255:1
Note

Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the German Association for Research in Music Education

Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-02-02Bibliographically approved
Georgii-Hemming, E. (2017). What is quality?: the political debate on education and its implications for pluralism and diversity in education. Philosophy of Music Education Review, 25(1), 67-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is quality?: the political debate on education and its implications for pluralism and diversity in education
2017 (English)In: Philosophy of Music Education Review, ISSN 1063-5734, E-ISSN 1543-3412, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The quality of education is currently considered to be a concern of the highest political priority. However, quality assurances of all kinds seem to be built on, and above all result in, a number of quantities. In this essay, I discuss the quality concept’s traditional and philosophical meaning and how it is being used today, but above all how our current understanding of “quality” may influence pluralism and diversity in education and music education. The worrying trends discussed in this essay are too complex to be solved with quick efforts by philosophers, researchers and/or teachers. Nevertheless, I illuminate some aspects of the issue, which are all in need of further discussions and analysis in relation to the area of music. I also indicate a number of philosophical concepts that can contribute to creating awareness as well as evoke some resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Indiana University Press, 2017
Keywords
quality assessment; knowledge politics; equality; tasks for philosophy of music education
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36251 (URN)10.2979/philmusieducrevi.25.1.06 (DOI)000399199600006 ()
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Larsson, C., Georgii-Hemming, E., Siljamäki, E., MacGlone, U. & Gravem Johansen, G. (2016). Challenges and Possibilities for Improvisation in Music Education: A symposium presenting different aspects of improvisation. In: : . Paper presented at European Education Research Association (ECER 2016), Dublin, Ireland, August 22-26, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges and Possibilities for Improvisation in Music Education: A symposium presenting different aspects of improvisation
Show others...
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Improvisation holds a problematic position – in music education as well as in music education research. According to music education syllabi in most European countries, improvisation is a part of the subject content and, as such can even be even mandatory. Previous studies have, however, shown that music teachers find it difficult to incorporate improvisation activities in their teaching (e.g. Ferm Thorgersen & Zandén 2014; Whitcomb 2007). As a result, the concept of improvisation has received an increasing interest from scholars and educators. Yet, at present it is an under developed field in music education contexts.

This symposium brings together researchers in music education with special interests in questions related to research in improvisation and improvisation pedagogy. All presenters conduct research on improvisation in music education, based in either ethnography or participating action research. In addition, the researchers represent four European countries – Finland, Norway, Scotland and Sweden – where new curricula quite recently have been introduced. According to these, improvisation activities are expected to take place in music education and the common argument is it is assumed that improvisation can develop creativity and in turn nurture a critical mind (Gonzales, 2015). Similar ideas are apparent in key documents related to education and training in Europe (see e.g. OECD, 2013). Music education research is, in other words, confronted with several challenging questions about the role of, and assumptions about, improvisation.

This symposium focuses on how we can understand improvisation in educational contexts. Within this symposium, we will address a number of fundamental questions designed to take the audience to the heart of current debates around improvisation. Two main questions guide this symposium:

   How can we theoretically understand improvisation in an educational context?

   What are the implications and challenges for music education research on   improvisation?

Firstly, we will present a literature review of improvisation in music education research, setting the background and illustrating the current situation. We will then consider particular challenges and/or possibilities music education researchers and music educators perceive and encounter. Following this, we will discuss different visions of improvisation pedagogy which have emerged from the music education research.

Secondly, the symposium will bring forth and reflect on new methodological approaches to research improvisation exemplified in three different educational environments: kindergarten/preschool, elementary school and adult education. Approaches to free improvisation will be presented instrumentally and vocally, as well as individually and collaboratively. Importantly, the concept of free improvisation is suggested to include social, visual and bodily engagement with potential forcreating a space for facilitation of individual and collaborative creativity. Also original methodological and theoretical constructs that have been developed will be presented, constructs, which delineate the strengths that participants may build through practices of free improvisation,

We suggest

   key approaches and methodologies in music education research, and in teaching music through improvisation, which are drawn from research and practice, thus benefitting both music education research and future teachers

   that approaches to teaching music through improvisation have potential benefits in broader music education and developing these is an important research priority

   that as interest seems to be growing amongst music educators in utilising improvisation in music education, effective teaching materials and robust methods of delivery are needed

   the importance to advance theoretical and critical appraisals for comprehension of practice and research concerning improvisation in music education.

References

Gonzales, Anita (2015). (Pre-)Scripted Creativity: An Examination of the Creativity Movement in Spain’s Contemporary MusicEducation Literature. Paper presentation at ECER conference 2015

Ferm Thorgersen, Cecilia; Zandén, Olle (2014). Teaching for Learning or Teaching for documentation? Music teacherśperspectives on a Swedish curriculum reform. In British Journal of Music Education. September 2014, pp1-14. DOI:10.1017/S0265051714000166

Education Scotland, Curriculum for Excellence, http://www.educationscotland.gov.ukhttp://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/nqmusic/learningandteaching/composingskills/index.asp 2016-01-10

Finnish National Board of Education (Utbildningsstyrelsen) (2004). National core curriculum for basic education (Grundernaför läroplanen för den grundläggande utbildningen) http://www.oph.fi/lp2016/grunderna_for_laroplanen

Finnish National Board of Education Utbildningsstyrelsen (2014). National core curriculum for basic education (Grunderna förläroplanen för den grundläggande utbildningen Föreskrifter och anvisningar 2014:96)http://www.oph.fi/lp2016/grunderna_for_laroplanen

National Agency for Education (Skolverket), (2011). Curriculum for the compulsory school, preschool class and the recreationcentre 2011. www.skolverket.se/publikationer

OECD (2013), PISA 2012 Results: Ready to Learn: Students’ Engagement, Drive and Self-Beliefs (Volume III), PISA, OECDPublishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264201170-en

Whitcomb, Rachel (2007). Improvisation in elementary general music: A survey study. The Kodály Envoy, 34(1), 5-10.

Winner, E., T. Goldstein and S. Vincent-Lancrin (2013), Art for Art's Sake?: The Impact of Arts Education, EducationalResearch and Innovation, OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264180789-en

National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52884 (URN)
Conference
European Education Research Association (ECER 2016), Dublin, Ireland, August 22-26, 2016
Available from: 2016-10-10 Created: 2016-10-10 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Ålander, J. & Georgii-Hemming, E. (2016). “The public foreigner” : Conceptualising migrant music research. In: BSA Annual Conference 2016: . Paper presented at British Sociological Association 2016 Annual conference, Aston University, Birmingham, UK, April 6–8, 2016. BSA Publications Ltd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The public foreigner” : Conceptualising migrant music research
2016 (English)In: BSA Annual Conference 2016, BSA Publications Ltd , 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper will outline global trends in research on ‘immigrants’’ participation in music practices, as a means of exploring how academic narratives of migration, integration, and transcultural communication are discursively constructed and communicated.

We focus on migrant music practices, specifically, as spaces of resistance and development where cultural authority can be negotiated. Live performances potentially facilitate transcultural communication where diasporic identities can be transformed, and articulated through musical listening. Thus, analysing migrant music as a social practice illustrates the social, historical and agential context of migration experiences as well as how migrant music practices and the figure of ‘the migrant’ are characterised in relation to wider cultural and material forces.

Our analysis, based on a systematic review of empirical literature, draws from articles published between 2003–2015. Our final research criteria yielded 219 articles which spanned multiple disciplines, though predominantly from social anthropology, ethnomusicology, and sociology.

Based on our study, the first half of the paper will demonstrate key discursive trends in the literature, focusing largely on how “contexts” are judged to be vital for individual and group experiences as well as pointing to culturally specific socio-political, material and ethnic boundaries. The second half critically analyses problematic assumptions around what constitutes ‘migrant music practices’ but also how migrants themselves are characterized. In addition, it reveals that academic narratives on migration, integration, transcultural communication in a musical context are often narrativistic and do not reflect sufficiently on methodological concerns, interpretation and researchers’ own assumptions.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BSA Publications Ltd, 2016
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49752 (URN)9780904569469 (ISBN)
Conference
British Sociological Association 2016 Annual conference, Aston University, Birmingham, UK, April 6–8, 2016
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Georgii-Hemming, E. (2015). Confusing quality with quantity: What can philosophy contribute to contemporary (music) education?. In: : . Paper presented at European Educational Research Association (ECER 2015), Budapest, Hungary, September 7–11, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confusing quality with quantity: What can philosophy contribute to contemporary (music) education?
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52883 (URN)
Conference
European Educational Research Association (ECER 2015), Budapest, Hungary, September 7–11, 2015
Available from: 2016-10-10 Created: 2016-10-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3758-7541

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