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Lidskog, R., Berg, M., Gustafsson, K. M. & Löfmarck, E. (2020). Cold Science Meets Hot Weather: Environmental Threats, Emotional Messages and Scientific Storytelling. Media and Communication, 8(1), 118-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cold Science Meets Hot Weather: Environmental Threats, Emotional Messages and Scientific Storytelling
2020 (English)In: Media and Communication, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 118-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Science is frequently called upon to provide guidance in the work towards sustainable development. However, for science to promote action, it is not sufficient that scientific advice is seen as competent and trustworthy. Such advice must also be perceived as meaningful and important, showing the need and urgency of taking action. This article discusses how science tries to facilitate action. It claims that the use of scientific storytelling—coherent stories told by scientists about environmental trajectories—are central in this; these stories provide meaning and motivate and guide action. To do this, the storylines need to include both a normative orientation and emotional appeals. Two different cases of scientific storytelling are analyzed: one is a dystopic story about a world rushing towards ecological catastrophe, and the other is an optimistic story about a world making dramatic progress. These macrosocial stories offer science-based ways to see the world and aim to foster and guide action. The article concludes by stating that using storylines in scientific storytelling can elicit fear, inspire hope, and guide action. The storylines connect cold and distant scientific findings to passionate imperatives about the need for social transformation. However, this attachment to emotions and values needs to be done reflexively, not only in order to create engagement with an issue but also to counteract a post-truth society where passionate imperatives go against scientific knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogitatio, 2020
Keywords
Anthropocene, emotions, Factfulness, narratives, science communication, scientific storytelling, The Great Acceleration
National Category
Sociology Media and Communications
Research subject
Sociology; Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80839 (URN)10.17645/mac.v8i1.2432 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-03-25 Created: 2020-03-25 Last updated: 2020-04-06Bibliographically approved
Löfmarck, E. & Lidskog, R. (2019). Coping with Fragmentation: On the Role of Techno-Scientific Knowledge within the Sami Community. Society & Natural Resources, 32(11), 1293-1311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping with Fragmentation: On the Role of Techno-Scientific Knowledge within the Sami Community
2019 (English)In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1293-1311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The idea that different knowledge systems should be combined is prominent within environmental governance. This is not least the case regarding sustainability, for which indigenous knowledge is seen as crucial. While the practical challenges related to bridging knowledge systems are well documented, less is known about what it means from an indigenous perspective. Drawing on an interview study, this paper explores views on techno-scientific knowledge among the Sami (indigenous to Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula of Russia). The analysis finds that techno-scientific knowledge is employed as coping strategies in the face of colonial stressors. Land fragmentation poses a particular threat to the Sami way of life, and in response, a number of modern techniques have been adopted. There is a clear sense that valuable traditional knowledge is being lost in the process, with consequences for both sustainability and Sami identity. The authors conclude that contemporary understandings of what cross-fertilization means need to be thoroughly reconsidered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
coping strategies, indigenous knowledge, IPBES, knowledge divide, land fragmentation, Sami community
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76432 (URN)10.1080/08941920.2019.1633449 (DOI)000482841800007 ()2-s2.0-85068859213 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Sténs, A., Roberge, J.-M., Löfmarck, E., Lindahl, K. B., Felton, A., Widmark, C., . . . Ranius, T. (2019). From ecological knowledge to conservation policy: a case study on green tree retention and continuous-cover forestry in Sweden. Biodiversity and Conservation, 28(13), 3547-3574
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From ecological knowledge to conservation policy: a case study on green tree retention and continuous-cover forestry in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 28, no 13, p. 3547-3574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The extent to which scientific knowledge translates into practice is a pervasive question. We analysed to what extent and how ecological scientists gave input to policy for two approaches advocated for promoting forest biodiversity in production forests in Sweden: green-tree retention (GTR) and continuous-cover forestry (CCF). GTR was introduced into forest policy in the 1970s and became widely implemented in the 1990s. Ecological scientists took part in the policy process by providing expert opinions, educational activities and as lobbyists, long before research confirming the positive effects of GTR on biodiversity was produced. In contrast, CCF was essentially banned in forest legislation in 1979. In the 1990s, policy implicitly opened up for CCF implementation, but CCF still remains largely a rare silvicultural outlier. Scientific publications addressing CCF appeared earlier than GTR studies, but with less focus on the effects on biodiversity. Ecological scientists promoted CCF in certain areas, but knowledge from other disciplines and other socio-political factors appear to have been more important than ecological arguments in the case of CCF. The wide uptake of GTR was enhanced by its consistency with the silvicultural knowledge and normative values that forest managers had adopted for almost a century, whereas CCF challenged those ideas. Public pressure and institutional requirements were also key to GTR implementation but were not in place for CCF. Thus, scientific ecological knowledge may play an important role for policy uptake and development, but knowledge from other research disciplines and socio-political factors are also important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Environmental history, Environmental policy, Forest biodiversity, Biodiversity conservation, Policy uptake
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77432 (URN)10.1007/s10531-019-01836-2 (DOI)000488929900009 ()
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

Funding Agencies:

Umea University  

Future Forests  

Swedish Forestry Industry  

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå University  

Forestry Research Institute of Sweden 

Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, K. M., Berg, M., Lidskog, R. & Löfmarck, E. (2019). Intersectional boundary work in socializing new experts: The case of IPBES. Ecosystems and people, 15(1), 181-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intersectional boundary work in socializing new experts: The case of IPBES
2019 (English)In: Ecosystems and people, ISSN 2639-5908, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Expert organizations are often described as facilitators of the interactions between science and policy. In managing this boundary, they must also manage other boundaries, such as those between different knowledge systems and between different categories of actors. However, how this intersectional boundary work is performed, and what it implies, is still unexplored territory. Focusing on the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), this study contributes knowledge on the intersectionality of boundary work and how it influences the production of global policy-relevant knowledge. This is done by examining how IPBES socializes junior experts to become senior experts. This socialization process makes a number of norms and ideals visible and enables an analysis of how the know- how of boundary work is passed forward from one generation of experts to the next. The study analyzes three boundaries: between senior and junior experts, between science and policy, and between scientific knowledge and indigenous and local knowledge. The findings show how intersectional boundary work is crucial in the creation of expert organizations and policy-relevant knowledge. In the case of IPBES, this study shows how the institutionalization of the organization unintentionally has created restrictions for the boundary work between different knowledge systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Boundary work, IPBES, socialization, experts, science-policy, indigenous knowledge, local knowledge
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74975 (URN)10.1080/26395916.2019.1628105 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-07-03 Created: 2019-07-03 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, K. M., Löfmarck, E., Salmonsson, L. & Uggla, Y. (2019). Skrivutveckling i stora studentgrupper: Erfarenheter från ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt. Örebro: niversity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skrivutveckling i stora studentgrupper: Erfarenheter från ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report presents the results from a pedagogical project focusing students’ writing in higher education. Literature in this field conclude that student writing should be integrated in teaching of the subject with a plan for progression. Teachers’ and students’ experience indicate that students write a lot during their education, but only occasionally get concrete feedback on the writing as such. Focus groups with students showed that students found it difficult to write distinct and to differentiate between text genres. The teachers reported lack of ”tools” to help the students to improve their writing. The report suggest a model for the work with students writing based on goal setting; inventory; identifying problem areas; prioritizing; implementation; and follow-up and revision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: niversity, 2019. p. 30
Series
Arbetsrapporter från Högskolepedagogiskt centrum ; 1
Keywords
Academic writing, student writing, higher education, pedagogical development
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76308 (URN)978-91-87789-24-3 (ISBN)
Note

Redaktion: Henric Bagerius och Sverre Wide.

Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Boström, M., Andersson, E., Berg, M., Gustafsson, K. M., Gustavsson, E., Hysing, E., . . . Öhman, J. (2018). Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach. Sustainability, 10(12), Article ID 4479.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach
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2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Continued unsustainability and surpassed planetary boundaries require not only scientific and technological advances, but deep and enduring social and cultural changes. The purpose of this article is to contribute a theoretical approach to understand conditions and constraints for societal change towards sustainable development. In order to break with unsustainable norms, habits, practices, and structures, there is a need for learning for transformation, not only adaption. Based on a critical literature review within the field of learning for sustainable development, our approach is a development of the concept of transformative learning, by integrating three additional dimensions—Institutional Structures, Social Practices, and Conflict Perspectives. This approach acknowledges conflicts on macro, meso, and micro levels, as well as structural and cultural constraints. It contends that transformative learning is processual, interactional, long-term, and cumbersome. It takes place within existing institutions and social practices, while also transcending them. The article adopts an interdisciplinary social science perspective that acknowledges the importance of transformative learning in order for communities, organizations, and individuals to be able to deal with global sustainability problems, acknowledging the societal and personal conflicts involved in such transformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
conflict, institutional, learning, social change, social practice, structure, transformative
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70403 (URN)10.3390/su10124479 (DOI)000455338100145 ()2-s2.0-85057440663 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Löfmarck, E. & Lidskog, R. (2017). Bumping against the boundary: IPBES and the knowledge divide. Environmental Science and Policy, 69, 22-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bumping against the boundary: IPBES and the knowledge divide
2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 69, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Founded in 2012, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is one of the most ambitious attempts to date to bridge the divide between scientific knowledge and indigenous and local knowledge. Doing so requires overcoming participatory, epistemological and ontological challenges, including different communicative forms, diverging criteria for knowledge validation, and conflicting views of nature. Central IPBES documents are analyzed to see how the platform deals with these challenges. While IPBES constitutes an unprecedented, innovative and ambitious institutional design for the cross-fertilization of knowledge, the results show that IPBES (i) struggles to reconcile an open, collaborative atmosphere with the demands for structure set by the scientific format, (ii) tends to shy away from potentially conflict-laden issues and disagreements, (iii) often treats scientific knowledge and indigenous or local knowledge as easily distinguishable entities, and (iv) has yet to solve the epistemological challenges of knowledge generation and validation when working across knowledge-systems. Taken together, these features seem to hinder the cross-fertilization of knowledge. The case of IPBES thus holds important lessons for future efforts to transform both knowledge production and the overall framing of challenges within global environmental governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Knowledge system, third knowledge space, boundary work, indigenous knowledge, IPBES, global environmental governance
National Category
Sociology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54705 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2016.12.008 (DOI)000393723400003 ()2-s2.0-85008230244 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R., Löfmarck, E. & Uggla, Y. (2017). Forestry and the environment: Tensions in a transforming modernity. Sociologisk forskning, 54(4), 283-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forestry and the environment: Tensions in a transforming modernity
2017 (English)In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 283-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden is often described as an environmental forerunner and one of the most ecologically modernized countries in the world, one where social welfare, economic growth and environmental protection mutually support each other. Examining the case of Swedish forestry, we discuss a number of tensions in this sector that mirror some general tensions in Swedish society and explore how these tensions can be understood as part of a transforming modernity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sweden: Swedish Sociological Association, 2017
Keywords
Ecological modernization, second modernity, Swedish forestry
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63889 (URN)000419291200004 ()
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Löfmarck, E., Uggla, Y. & Lidskog, R. (2017). Freedom with what?: Interpretations of “responsibility” in Swedish forestry practice. Forest Policy and Economics, 75, 34-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Freedom with what?: Interpretations of “responsibility” in Swedish forestry practice
2017 (English)In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 75, p. 34-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Responsibility is a key aspect of all regulation, and forest regulation is no exception. Howshould responsibility be understood and used in a time characterized by complexity and uncertainty? This paper develops a typology that distinguishes six notions of responsibility and then employs it in analyzing interpretations of responsibility in Swedish forestry practice. The Swedish forest management system is a deregulated system structured by the governing principle of “freedom with responsibility.” By investigating how responsibility is understood and enacted by forest consultants and forest owners, we demonstrate the practical fluidity of the responsibility concept. We emphasize the need for an understanding of responsibility that fosters sensitivity and adaptiveness to external issues and actors in the face of uncertainty, and identify obstacles in current forestry policy and practice to enacting such an understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Responsibility, regulation, norms, forest governance, forest policy
National Category
Sociology Forest Science
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54518 (URN)10.1016/j.forpol.2016.12.004 (DOI)000393263700004 ()2-s2.0-85006507884 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

Funding Agencies:

Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogforsk)

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)

Umeå University

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Löfmarck, E. (2017). Lay risk management. In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication: Health and Risk Communication. Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lay risk management
2017 (English)In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication: Health and Risk Communication, Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How do individuals relate to risk in everyday life? Poorly, judging by the very influential works within psychology that focus upon the heuristics and biases inherent to lay responses to risk and uncertainty. The point of departure for such research is that risks are calculable, and, as lay responses often under- or overestimate statistical probabilities, they are more or less irrational. This approach has been criticized for failing to appreciate that risks are managed in relation to a multitude of other values and needs, which are often difficult to calculate instrumentally. Thus, real-life risk management is far too complex to allow simple categorizations of rational or irrational.

A developing strand of research within sociology and other disciplines concerned with sociocultural aspects transcends the rational/irrational dichotomy when theorizing risk management in everyday life. The realization that factors such as emotion, trust, scientific knowledge, and intuition are functional and inseparable parts of lay risk management have been differently conceptualized: as, for example, bricolage, in-between strategies, and emotion-risk assemblage. The common task of this strand is trying to account for the complexity and social embeddedness of lay risk management, often by probing deep into the life-world using qualitative methods. Lay risk management is structured by the need to “get on” with life, while at the same time being surrounded by sometimes challenging risk messages.

This perspective on risk and everyday life thus holds potentially important lessons for risk communicators. For risk communication to be effective, it needs to understand the complexity of lay risk management and the interpretative resources that are available to people in their lifeworld. It needs to connect to and be made compatible with those resources, and it needs to leave room for agency so that people can get on with their lives while at the same time incorporating the risk message. It also becomes important to understand and acknowledge the meaning people attribute to various practices and how this is related to self-identity. When this is not the case, risk messages will likely be ignored or substantially modified. In essence, communicating risk requires groundwork to figure out how and why people relate to the risks in question in their specific context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
risk, everyday life, emotion, rationality, risk perception, identity, health, uncertainty, management
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61366 (URN)10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.535 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3679-3140

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