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Göthlin Eremo, A., Lagergren, K., Othman, L., Montgomery, S., Andersson, G. & Tina, E. (2020). Evaluation of SPP1/osteopontin expression as predictor of recurrence in tamoxifen treated breast cancer. Scientific Reports, 10(1), Article ID 1451.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of SPP1/osteopontin expression as predictor of recurrence in tamoxifen treated breast cancer
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2020 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen may experience recurrence due to endocrine resistance, which highlights the need for additional predictive and prognostic biomarkers. The glyco-phosphoprotein osteopontin (OPN), encoded by the SPP1 gene, has previously shown to be associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, studies on the predictive value of OPN are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated tissue SPP1 mRNA and OPN protein expression as markers of recurrence in estrogen receptor- positive (ER+) breast cancer tissue. Tamoxifen- treated patients with recurrence or non-recurrence were selected using a matched case-control design. SPP1 mRNA expression was analysed using qPCR (n = 100) and OPN protein by immunohistochemistry (n = 116) using different antibodies. Odds ratios were estimated with conditional logistic regression. The SPP1 expression increased the risk of recurrence with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.50 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.30-4.82), after adjustment for tumour grade, HER 2 status and other treatments to OR 3.62 (95% CI; 1.45-9.07). However, OPN protein expression was not associated with risk of recurrence or with SPP1-gene expression, suggesting SPP1 mRNA a stronger prognostic marker candidate compared to tumor tissue OPN protein.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2020
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79955 (URN)10.1038/s41598-020-58323-w (DOI)31996744 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078689992 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, H., Hasselgren, M., Montgomery, S., Lisspers, K., Ställberg, B., Janson, C. & Sundh, J. (2020). Factors associated with well-controlled asthma: A cross-sectional study [Letter to the editor]. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 75(1), 208-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with well-controlled asthma: A cross-sectional study
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2020 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 208-211Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Munksgaard Forlag, 2020
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75593 (URN)10.1111/all.13976 (DOI)000479801000001 ()31298735 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Note

Funding Agencies:

County councils of the Uppsala-Örebro Health Care region

Bror Hjerpstedts Foundation  

Center for Clinical Research, Dalarna  

Region Örebro County through ALF 

Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Batyrbekova, N., Aleman, S., Lybeck, C., Montgomery, S. & Duberg, A.-S. (2020). Hepatitis C virus infection and the temporal trends in the risk of liver cancer: a national register-based cohort study in Sweden. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 29(1), 63-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hepatitis C virus infection and the temporal trends in the risk of liver cancer: a national register-based cohort study in Sweden
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2020 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In many countries, including Sweden, the birth cohorts with the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have now reached the ages with high risk of primary liver cancer (PLC). The aims were to investigate the temporal trends in PLC incidence and the relative risks of PLC among people diagnosed with HCV-infection between 1990 and 2015.

METHODS: The HCV-cohort (n: 52,853) was compared with a matched non-HCV comparison-cohort (n: 523,649). Both the Cancer (CR) and Death registers (DR) were used for follow-up. The crude and age-standardised PLC incidence rates were calculated. The relative risk was estimated as standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and as hazard ratios (HR) using stratified Cox hazards regression.

RESULTS: There were 1,609 with PLC-diagnosis in the HCV-cohort, the annual number increased continuously with the crude incidence rate reaching 4.56 per 1,000 person-years in 2013, while remaining low and stable in the comparison-cohort. In the HCV-cohort, the age-standardised PLC incidence rates per 1,000 person-years remained relatively constant at 2.64 (95% CI: 1.54, 3.75) in 2000 and 3.31 (2.51, 4.12) in 2014. The highest SIR was 73 (65.9, 79.5) among those infected for 35-40 years; and the highest HR was 65.9 (55.9, 77.6) for men and 62.2 (31.9, 121.1) for women.

CONCLUSIONS: There was a considerable increase in PLC-incidence over time and an extremely high relative risk in the population with HCV-infection for more than 35 years.

IMPACT: The national HCV-associated PLC-incidence should be monitored in future studies to evaluate the effect of DAA-treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2020
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77946 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0769 (DOI)31719064 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Brand, J., Hiyoshi, A., Cao, Y., Lawlor, D. A., Cnattingius, S. & Montgomery, S. (2020). Maternal smoking during pregnancy and fractures in offspring: national register based sibling comparison study. BMJ. British Medical Journal, 368, Article ID l7057.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal smoking during pregnancy and fractures in offspring: national register based sibling comparison study
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2020 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 368, article id l7057Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To study the impact of maternal smoking during pregnancy on fractures in offspring during different developmental stages of life.

DESIGN: National register based birth cohort study with a sibling comparison design.

SETTING: Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: 1 680 307 people born in Sweden between 1983 and 2000 to women who smoked (n=377 367, 22.5%) and did not smoke (n=1 302 940) in early pregnancy. Follow-up was until 31 December 2014.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Fractures by attained age up to 32 years.

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 21.1 years, 377 970 fractures were observed (the overall incidence rate for fracture standardised by calendar year of birth was 11.8 per 1000 person years). The association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and risk of fracture in offspring differed by attained age. Maternal smoking was associated with a higher rate of fractures in offspring before 1 year of age in the entire cohort (birth year standardised fracture rates in those exposed and unexposed to maternal smoking were 1.59 and 1.28 per 1000 person years, respectively). After adjustment for potential confounders the hazard ratio for maternal smoking compared with no smoking was 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.45). This association followed a dose dependent pattern (compared with no smoking, hazard ratios for 1-9 cigarettes/day and >= 10 cigarettes/day were 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.39) and 1.41 (1.18 to 1.69), respectively) and persisted in within-sibship comparisons although with wider confidence intervals (compared with no smoking, 1.58 (1.01 to 2.46)). Maternal smoking during pregnancy was also associated with an increased fracture incidence in offspring from age 5 to 32 years in whole cohort analyses, but these associations did not follow a dose dependent gradient. In within-sibship analyses, which controls for confounding by measured and unmeasured shared familial factors, corresponding point estimates were all close to null. Maternal smoking was not associated with risk of fracture in offspring between the ages of 1 and 5 years in any of the models.

CONCLUSION: Prenatal exposure to maternal smoking is associated with an increased rate of fracture during the first year of life but does not seem to have a long lasting biological influence on fractures later in childhood and up to early adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2020
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79884 (URN)10.1136/bmj.l7057 (DOI)000510390400002 ()31996343 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078689979 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Orebro University Hospital Research Foundation Nyckelfonden OLL-695391

Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) ES/JO19119/1

Medical Research Council UK (MRC) MC_UU_00011/6

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) NF-0616-10102

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Tian, Q., Li, M., Montgomery, S., Fang, B., Wang, C., Xia, T. & Cao, Y. (2020). Short-Term Associations of Fine Particulate Matter and Synoptic Weather Types with Cardiovascular Mortality: An Ecological Time-Series Study in Shanghai, China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(3), Article ID E1111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-Term Associations of Fine Particulate Matter and Synoptic Weather Types with Cardiovascular Mortality: An Ecological Time-Series Study in Shanghai, China
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 3, article id E1111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Exposures to both ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and extreme weather conditions have been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths in numerous epidemiologic studies. However, evidence on the associations with CVD deaths for interaction effects between PM2.5 and weather conditions is still limited. This study aimed to investigate associations of exposures to PM2.5 and weather conditions with cardiovascular mortality, and further to investigate the synergistic or antagonistic effects of ambient air pollutants and synoptic weather types (SWTs). Methods: Information on daily CVD deaths, air pollution, and meteorological conditions between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014 was obtained in Shanghai, China. Generalized additive models were used to assess the associations of daily PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological factors with CVD deaths. A 15-day lag analysis was conducted using a polynomial distributed lag model to access the lag patterns for associations with PM2.5. Results: During the study period, the total number of CVD deaths in Shanghai was 59,486, with a daily mean of 54.3 deaths. The average daily PM2.5 concentration was 55.0 µg/m3. Each 10 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration was associated with a 1.26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40%, 2.12%) increase in CVD mortality. No SWT was statistically significantly associated with CVD deaths. For the interaction between PM2.5 and SWT, statistically significant interactions were found between PM2.5 and cold weather, with risk for PM2.5 in cold dry SWT decreasing by 1.47% (95% CI: 0.54%, 2.39%), and in cold humid SWT the risk decreased by 1.45% (95% CI: 0.52%, 2.36%). In the lag effect analysis, statistically significant positive associations were found for PM2.5 in the 1-3 lag days, while no statistically significant effects were found for other lag day periods. Conclusions: Exposure to PM2.5 was associated with short-term increased risk of cardiovascular deaths with some lag effects, while the cold weather may have an antagonistic effect with PM2.5. However, the ecological study design limited the possibility to identify a causal relationship, so prospective studies with individual level data are warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
PM2.5, air pollution, antagonistic effect, cardiovascular mortality, fine particulate matter, interaction effect, lag effect, synergistic effect, synoptic weather type, weather
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79921 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17031111 (DOI)32050549 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Visuri, I., Eriksson, C., Mårdberg, E., Grip, O., Gustavsson, A., Hjortswang, H., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2019). Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG). Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 13(Suppl. 1), S443-S444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG)
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, no Suppl. 1, p. S443-S444Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73336 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy222.773 (DOI)000460544502205 ()
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Kantor, E. D., Udumyan, R., Giovannucci, E. L., Valdimarsdottir, U. A., Signorello, L. B., Montgomery, S. & Fall, K. (2019). Association of Blood Marker of Inflammation in Late Adolescence With Premature Mortality [Letter to the editor]. JAMA pediatrics, 173(11), 1095-1097
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Blood Marker of Inflammation in Late Adolescence With Premature Mortality
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2019 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 173, no 11, p. 1095-1097Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76166 (URN)10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2835 (DOI)000503205800017 ()31479147 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071754548 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro University  

Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001ES/JO19119/1

United States Department of Health & Human Services

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA

NIH National Cancer Institute (NCI) T32CA009001 P30CA008748

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health 

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Smirnova, J., von Kobyletzki, L., Lindberg, M., Svensson, Å., Langan, S. M. & Montgomery, S. (2019). Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning: a national cohort study. British Journal of Dermatology, 180(3), 559-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning: a national cohort study
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 180, no 3, p. 559-564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment.

METHODS: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17 to 20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semi-structured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. Highest level of achieved education was obtained through record linkage.

RESULTS: The study population included 234 715 men, 1 673 (0·7%) had an AD diagnosis. AD was associated with a greater risk of low stress resilience (adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 1·60; 95% confidence interval 1·38 to 1·86). AD was associated with higher cognitive function (b coefficient 0·15; 0·05 to 0·24) and higher educational level (RRR 1·29; 1·13 to 1·47) but adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin attenuated the magnitude of the associations and eliminated statistical significance (b coefficient 0·06; -0·03 to 0·15) and (RRR 1·16; 1·00 to 1·35).

CONCLUSIONS: Swedish males with AD had lower stress resilience in late adolescence but did not have lower cognitive function or poorer educational attainment. The lower stress resilience associated with AD is consistent with an increased risk of possible long-term adverse health outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69903 (URN)10.1111/bjd.17330 (DOI)000460701000035 ()30339272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058052817 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.K. Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1 

Wellcome Senior Clinical Fellowship  205039/Z/16/Z 

Centre for Clinical Research, Varmland County Council  

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Udumyan, R., Montgomery, S., Fang, F., Valdimarsdóttir, U., Hardardottir, H., Ekbom, A., . . . Fall, K. (2019). Beta-blocker use and lung cancer mortality in a nationwide cohort study of patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 29(1), 119-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beta-blocker use and lung cancer mortality in a nationwide cohort study of patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 119-126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Beta-adrenergic receptor blockers have been associated with improved survival among patients with different types of malignancies, but available data for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is contradictory and limited to small hospital-based studies. We therefore aimed to investigate if β-blocker use at the time of cancer diagnosis is associated with lung cancer mortality in the largest general population-based cohort of patients with NSCLC to date.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: For this retrospectively defined nationwide cohort study, we used prospectively collected data from Swedish population and health registers. Through the Swedish Cancer Register, we identified 18,429 patients diagnosed with a primary NSCLC between 2006 and 2014 with follow-up to 2015. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between beta-blocker use at time of cancer diagnosis ascertained from the Prescribed Drug Register and cancer-specific mortality identified from the Cause of Death Register.

RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 10.2 months, 14,994 patients died (including 13,398 from lung cancer). Compared with non-use, beta-blocker use (predominantly prevalent use, 93%) was not associated with lung cancer mortality [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.01 (0.97-1.06)]. However, the possibility that diverging associations for specific beta-blockers and some histopathological subtypes exist cannot be excluded.

CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort of NSCLC patients, beta-blocker use was not associated with lung cancer mortality when assessed in aggregate in the total cohort, but evidence for some beta-blockers is less conclusive.

IMPACT: Our results do not indicate that beta-blocker use at lung cancer diagnosis reduces the cancer-specific mortality rate in NSCLC patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prevention American Association for Cancer Research, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77618 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0710 (DOI)31641010 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Cheng, H., Montgomery, S., Green, A. & Furnham, A. (2019). Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a nationally representative sample. Journal of Public Health, Article ID fdz009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a nationally representative sample
2019 (English)In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1741-3842, E-ISSN 1741-3850, article id fdz009Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To identify personality, biomedical and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a large longitudinal sample.

METHOD: In total, 5360 participants with data on personality, neurological functioning, maternal smoking during pregnancy, education and occupation, physical exercise, adult self-reported BMI and obesity were included in the study. Obesity at 55 years was the outcome variable.

RESULTS: The rates of obesity increased from 9.5 to 22.8% from age 33 to 55 years. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted estimates) showed that childhood neurological functioning (OR = 1.32: 1.07-1.63, P < 0.01), maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR = 1.42: 1.22-1.65, P < 0.001), educational qualifications (OR = 0.54: 0.37-0.79, P < 0.01), trait conscientiousness (OR = 0.80:0.74-0.86, P < 0.001) and physical exercise (OR = 0.87: 0.82-0.92, P < 0.001) were significant predictors of obesity at age 55 years for both men and women. Trait extraversion for men (OR = 1.16: 1.07-1.26, P < 0.001) and trait emotional stability for women (OR = 0.90: 0.82-0.99, P < 0.05) were also significant predictors of the outcome variable.

CONCLUSION: Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors were all associated with adult obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Childhood neurological conditions, longitudinal, maternal smoking, obesity, personality traits, physical exercise
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72882 (URN)10.1093/pubmed/fdz009 (DOI)30799484 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
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