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Visuri, I., Eriksson, C., Mårdberg, E., Grip, O., Gustavsson, A., Hjortswang, H., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2019). Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG). Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 13(Suppl. 1), S443-S444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG)
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, no Suppl. 1, p. S443-S444Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73336 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy222.773 (DOI)000460544502205 ()
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Kantor, E. D., Udumyan, R., Giovannucci, E. L., Valdimarsdottir, U. A., Signorello, L. B., Montgomery, S. & Fall, K. (2019). Association of Blood Marker of Inflammation in Late Adolescence With Premature Mortality. JAMA pediatrics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Blood Marker of Inflammation in Late Adolescence With Premature Mortality
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2019 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76166 (URN)10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2835 (DOI)31479147 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Smirnova, J., von Kobyletzki, L., Lindberg, M., Svensson, Å., Langan, S. M. & Montgomery, S. (2019). Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning: a national cohort study. British Journal of Dermatology, 180(3), 559-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning: a national cohort study
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 180, no 3, p. 559-564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment.

METHODS: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17 to 20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semi-structured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. Highest level of achieved education was obtained through record linkage.

RESULTS: The study population included 234 715 men, 1 673 (0·7%) had an AD diagnosis. AD was associated with a greater risk of low stress resilience (adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 1·60; 95% confidence interval 1·38 to 1·86). AD was associated with higher cognitive function (b coefficient 0·15; 0·05 to 0·24) and higher educational level (RRR 1·29; 1·13 to 1·47) but adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin attenuated the magnitude of the associations and eliminated statistical significance (b coefficient 0·06; -0·03 to 0·15) and (RRR 1·16; 1·00 to 1·35).

CONCLUSIONS: Swedish males with AD had lower stress resilience in late adolescence but did not have lower cognitive function or poorer educational attainment. The lower stress resilience associated with AD is consistent with an increased risk of possible long-term adverse health outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69903 (URN)10.1111/bjd.17330 (DOI)000460701000035 ()30339272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058052817 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.K. Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1 

Wellcome Senior Clinical Fellowship  205039/Z/16/Z 

Centre for Clinical Research, Varmland County Council  

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Cheng, H., Montgomery, S., Green, A. & Furnham, A. (2019). Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a nationally representative sample. Journal of Public Health, Article ID fdz009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a nationally representative sample
2019 (English)In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1741-3842, E-ISSN 1741-3850, article id fdz009Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To identify personality, biomedical and behavioural factors associated with adult obesity in a large longitudinal sample.

METHOD: In total, 5360 participants with data on personality, neurological functioning, maternal smoking during pregnancy, education and occupation, physical exercise, adult self-reported BMI and obesity were included in the study. Obesity at 55 years was the outcome variable.

RESULTS: The rates of obesity increased from 9.5 to 22.8% from age 33 to 55 years. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted estimates) showed that childhood neurological functioning (OR = 1.32: 1.07-1.63, P < 0.01), maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR = 1.42: 1.22-1.65, P < 0.001), educational qualifications (OR = 0.54: 0.37-0.79, P < 0.01), trait conscientiousness (OR = 0.80:0.74-0.86, P < 0.001) and physical exercise (OR = 0.87: 0.82-0.92, P < 0.001) were significant predictors of obesity at age 55 years for both men and women. Trait extraversion for men (OR = 1.16: 1.07-1.26, P < 0.001) and trait emotional stability for women (OR = 0.90: 0.82-0.99, P < 0.05) were also significant predictors of the outcome variable.

CONCLUSION: Biomedical, psychological, environmental and behavioural factors were all associated with adult obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Childhood neurological conditions, longitudinal, maternal smoking, obesity, personality traits, physical exercise
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72882 (URN)10.1093/pubmed/fdz009 (DOI)30799484 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Theodosiou, G., Montgomery, S., Metsini, A., Dalgard, F. J., Svensson, Å. & von Kobyletzki, L. (2019). Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in Swedish Adults: A Population-based Study. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 99(11), 964-970
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in Swedish Adults: A Population-based Study
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2019 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 964-970Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The burden of atopic dermatitis (AD) was assessed. A population-based, cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed among 34,313 Swedish adults in 2017. The prevalence of AD was 14%. Adults with mild AD had an increased relative risk ratio (RRR) of severe depression (aRRR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.50-2.12) and anxiety (aRRR 1.97, 95% CI 1.69-2.30), which was higher for severe AD (aRRR 6.22 95% CI 4.60-8.42, aRRR 5.62 95% CI 4.10-7.71, respectively). Persons with severe AD were less likely to have a university degree (aRRR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.90) and more likely to have a lower annual income (238,000-324,000 SEK: aRRR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.77; 325,000 SEK or more 0.36; 0.25-0.58) compared with individuals without AD. These results suggest that AD implies an increased prevalence of comorbid mental conditions and an adverse impact on academic achievement and work. These adverse associations increase substantially for patients with severe AD and comorbid asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Publication of Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 2019
Keywords
atopic dermatitis, epidemiology, educational status, global burden of disease
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77217 (URN)10.2340/00015555-3257 (DOI)000487762500004 ()31289842 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Smith, K. A., Burkill, S., Hiyoshi, A., Olsson, T., Bahmanyar, S., Wormser, D., . . . Montgomery, S. (2019). Burden of comorbid diseases among MS patients in Sweden. Paper presented at 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS 2019) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Stockholm, Sweden, September 11-13, 2019. Multiple Sclerosis, 25(Suppl. 2), 646-646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burden of comorbid diseases among MS patients in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 2, p. 646-646Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: A raised risk for several comorbid diseases among MS patients has been identified. Most previous studies examined diseases separately rather than considering the overall burden of comorbidity. Multiple comorbidities may have important implica-tions for clinicians managing MS patients.

Aims: To describe the lifetime burden of comorbid diseases among MS patients and the rate of these diseases compared with the general population in Sweden.

Methods: MS patients identified using the MS Register and the Patient Register (PR) between 1964-2012 (n=25476) were matched by sex, age and county of residence with up to 10 general population comparators (n=251170). Prevalent and incident diag-noses of diseases other than MS for seven diseases categories were identified using the PR between 1987-2012. The total num-ber of comorbid diseases were compared using chi-square tests and prevalence rate ratios (PRR) were calculated. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using Cox regression and flexible non-para-metric survival models with age as the underlying time scale, MS as exposure, an additional comorbid disease as the outcome, adjusted for matching variables, education, number of previous comorbid diseases, and duration since study entry.

Results: The proportion of MS patients with 1,2 or 3+ comorbid disease diagnoses was greater than in the comparison cohort across all age groups (p< 0.001). The largest PRR (range 1.22-9.99) were among younger age groups (6-18,19-40,41-60 years) in autoim-mune, cardiovascular, diabetes and seizure disease categories. Additionally, PRR were elevated in depression and respiratory dis-eases, but not for renal diseases. PRR between 61-80 and 81-100 years were reduced compared to younger groups across all comorbid diseases, but remained elevated for respiratory, seizure and renal dis-eases. The adjusted HR for an additional diagnosis in MS patients was 1.7 (95% CI 1.66-1.75). Flexible modelling showed signifi-cantly higher risk for all ages of an additional disease diagnosis in MS patients; twice the risk (95% CI 1.8-2.2) up to age 35 years and decreasing with age to 1.3 (95% CI 1.5-1.25) over age 80 years.

Conclusions: MS patients in Sweden experience an increased burden of comorbidity and tend to be diagnosed with these dis-eases at an earlier age than the general population. This increased disease burden demonstrates the clinical reality of treating MS, indicating the need for integrated treatment approaches over sev-eral medical specialties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77233 (URN)000485303102374 ()
Conference
35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS 2019) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Stockholm, Sweden, September 11-13, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Piehl, F., Castelo-Branco, A., Chiesa, F., Conte, S., Rosenlund, M., Lee, S., . . . Montgomery, S. (2019). Cardiovascular disease in patients with multiple sclerosis: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden. Paper presented at 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS 2019) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Stockholm, Sweden, September 11-13, 2019. Multiple Sclerosis, 25(Suppl. 2), 49-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular disease in patients with multiple sclerosis: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 2, p. 49-50Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The cardiovascular disease (CVD) rate among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been shown to be elevated; however, studies involving more recently diagnosed patients are rare. Here we estimated the rate of CVD in patients before and after MS diagnosis as compared with a matched MS-free population.

Methods: Incident MS patients diagnosed in 2008-2016 were identified in the Swedish National Patient Register. MS patients were matched with 10 MS-free individuals by age, sex, and region of residence. Incidence rates (IR) per 10,000 person-years (PY) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) of cardiovascular outcomes were calculated after MS diagnosis (equivalent date for those without MS) and among those with no history of CVD before this date.

Results: In total, 6,602 MS patients and 61,828 without MS (female, 69%; median age, 40 years) were identified. Before MS diagnosis, patients showed higher proportions of stroke (2.0% vs 0.6%), transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (0.4% vs 0.2%) and peripheral vascular disease (0.3% vs 0.2%) compared with the MS-free cohort. The year before MS diagnosis, larger proportions were prescribed diuretics (8.4% vs 6.9%), peripheral vasodilators (1.4% vs 1.0%), lipid-modifying agents (5.6% vs 4.8%), and calcium channel blockers (3.7% vs 3.1%).After MS diagnosis, patients had a higher risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) (IRR 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.71), heart failure (HF) (IRR 1.36; 95% CI 1.02-1.80), and TIA (IRR 1.59; 95% CI 1.05-2.42) compared with the MS-free cohort. The risk of bradycardia (IRR, 2.61; 95% CI 1.14-5.97) was higher only in MS patients with no history of CVD. CVD incidence rates in MS patients were comparable between sexes except for the HF rate, which was higher among males (28.28 per 10,000 PY, 95% CI 18.79-40.87) than females (11.81 per 10,000 PY, 95% CI 7.71-17.30). The relative risk of MACE (IRR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15-5.00), TIA (IRR 7.03; 95% CI 2.62 -18.87), HF (IRR 3.28; 95% CI 1.46-7.37), and bradycardia (IRR 4.51; 95% CI 1.54-13.20) were higher among younger MS patients (aged < 40 years at diagnosis).

Conclusions: After MS diagnosis, MS patients showed an increased incidence of MACE, TIA, and HF compared with those without MS, irrespective of CVD history. The age-matched rela-tive risk was particularly high among younger MS patients. In particular, the relative risk of bradycardia was only higher among younger patients and patients with no history of CVD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77223 (URN)000485303100089 ()
Conference
35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS 2019) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Stockholm, Sweden, September 11-13, 2019
Note

Funding Agency:

Celgene Corporation 

Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Cheng, H., Montgomery, S., Green, A. & Furnham, A. (2019). Childhood heart problems, adulthood emotional stability, and sex associated with self-report heart conditions in adulthood. Journal of Health Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood heart problems, adulthood emotional stability, and sex associated with self-report heart conditions in adulthood
2019 (English)In: Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-1053, E-ISSN 1461-7277Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated biomedical, social, and psychological factors associated with self-reported heart conditions in adulthood in a British cohort. In total, 5697 (50.7% males) participants with data on parental socioeconomic status, childhood cognitive ability, childhood heart problems, educational qualifications, current occupational levels, adulthood personality traits, and the prevalence of self-reported heart conditions in adulthood were included in the study. The prevalence of self-reported heart conditions measured at age 54 years was the outcome variable. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that childhood heart problems identified by physicians (OR = 3.47:1.74-6.92, p < 0.001) and trait emotional stability (OR = 0.83:0.75-0.93, p < 0.001) were the significant and independent predictors of self-reported heart conditions in adulthood. There were also significant sex effects on the prevalence of the outcome variable (OR = 0.53:0.42-0.63, p < 0.001). Both a biomedical and a psychological factor were significantly associated with self-reported heart conditions in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
adulthood personality traits, childhood cognitive ability, childhood heart problems, heart conditions in adulthood, longitudinal, United Kingdom
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71184 (URN)10.1177/1359105318820107 (DOI)000454878400001 ()30599789 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-594-28-0001

Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, H., Hasselgren, M., Montgomery, S., Lisspers, K., Ställberg, B., Janson, C. & Sundh, J. (2019). Factors associated with well-controlled asthma: A cross-sectional study [Letter to the editor]. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with well-controlled asthma: A cross-sectional study
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2019 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Munksgaard Forlag, 2019
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75593 (URN)10.1111/all.13976 (DOI)000479801000001 ()31298735 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Note

Funding Agencies:

County councils of the Uppsala-Örebro Health Care region

Bror Hjerpstedts Foundation  

Center for Clinical Research, Dalarna  

Region Örebro County through ALF 

Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sundin, P.-O., Udumyan, R., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2019). Grip strength modifies the association between estimated glomerular filtration rate and all-cause mortality [Letter to the editor]. Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, 34(10), 1799-1801
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grip strength modifies the association between estimated glomerular filtration rate and all-cause mortality
2019 (English)In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1799-1801Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75586 (URN)10.1093/ndt/gfz140 (DOI)31317193 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6328-5494

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