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Smith, K. A., Hiyoshi, A., Vingeliene, S., von Kobyletzki, L. B. & Montgomery, S. (2024). Atopic dermatitis and cognitive function: a sibling comparison study among males in Sweden [Letter to the editor]. British Journal of Dermatology, 190(4), 592-593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atopic dermatitis and cognitive function: a sibling comparison study among males in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 190, no 4, p. 592-593Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A previous study indicated that atopic dermatitis (AD) was associated with better cognitive function in males during late adolescence. This association was examined among 2 021 369 males who had a medical examination and cognitive function testing during a military conscription assessment in late adolescence in Sweden. Sibling-comparison analysis to tackle confounding indicated that AD is associated with poorer cognitive function, suggesting AD in childhood is detrimental for the development of cognitive function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2024
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110623 (URN)10.1093/bjd/ljae004 (DOI)001159796600001 ()38170455 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01236Nyckelfonden
Note

This study was supported by grants from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (Forte) (grant number: 2019-01236), Nyckelfonden, and the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to the International Centre for Life Course Studies (ES/R008930/1).

Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-03-22Bibliographically approved
Hildén, K., Simmons, D., Hanson, U., Montgomery, S., Magnuson, A., Schwarcz, E. & Backman, H. (2024). Author reply [Letter to the editor]. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Author reply
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2024 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2024
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-112405 (URN)10.1111/1471-0528.17806 (DOI)001183574600001 ()38472158 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-03-19 Created: 2024-03-19 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
de Brun, M., Magnuson, A., Montgomery, S., Patil, S., Simmons, D., Berntorp, K., . . . Backman, H. (2024). Changing diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes (CDC4G) in Sweden: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial. PLoS Medicine, 21(7), Article ID e1004420.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes (CDC4G) in Sweden: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial
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2024 (English)In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e1004420Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organisation (WHO) 2013 diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been criticised due to the limited evidence of benefits on pregnancy outcomes in different populations when switching from previously higher glycemic thresholds to the lower WHO-2013 diagnostic criteria. The aim of this study was to determine whether the switch from previous Swedish (SWE-GDM) to the WHO-2013 GDM criteria in Sweden following risk factor-based screening improves pregnancy outcomes.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial was performed between January 1 and December 31, 2018 in 11 clusters (17 delivery units) across Sweden, including all pregnancies under care and excluding preexisting diabetes, gastric bypass surgery, or multifetal pregnancies from the analysis. After implementation of uniform clinical and laboratory guidelines, a number of clusters were randomised to intervention (switch to WHO-2013 GDM criteria) each month from February to November 2018. The primary outcome was large for gestational age (LGA, defined as birth weight >90th percentile). Other secondary and prespecified outcomes included maternal and neonatal birth complications. Primary analysis was by modified intention to treat (mITT), excluding 3 clusters that were randomised before study start but were unable to implement the intervention. Prespecified subgroup analysis was undertaken among those discordant for the definition of GDM. Multilevel mixed regression models were used to compare outcome LGA between WHO-2013 and SWE-GDM groups adjusted for clusters, time periods, and potential confounders. Multiple imputation was used for missing potential confounding variables. In the mITT analysis, 47 080 pregnancies were included with 6 882 (14.6%) oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) performed. The GDM prevalence increased from 595/22 797 (2.6%) to 1 591/24 283 (6.6%) after the intervention. In the mITT population, the switch was associated with no change in primary outcome LGA (2 790/24 209 (11.5%) versus 2 584/22 707 (11.4%)) producing an adjusted risk ratio (aRR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.02, p = 0.26). In the subgroup, the prevalence of LGA was 273/956 (28.8%) before and 278/1 239 (22.5%) after the switch, aRR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.01, p = 0.076). No serious events were reported. Potential limitations of this trial are mainly due to the trial design, including failure to adhere to guidelines within and between the clusters and influences of unidentified temporal variations.

CONCLUSIONS: In this study, implementing the WHO-2013 criteria in Sweden with risk factor-based screening did not significantly reduce LGA prevalence defined as birth weight >90th percentile, in the total population, or in the subgroup discordant for the definition of GDM. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effects of treating different glucose thresholds during pregnancy in different populations, with different screening strategies and clinical management guidelines, to optimise women's and children's health in the short and long term.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered with ISRCTN (41918550).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2024
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-114706 (URN)10.1371/journal.pmed.1004420 (DOI)38976676 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-00470Region Örebro County, OLL-930268; OLL-693551; OLL-786911Nyckelfonden, OLL-597601Mary von Sydow Foundation, 1017, 4917; 2618; 3718Region StockholmRegion Västmanland, LTV-966501Region Skåne, REGSKANE-622891
Note

Funding: Swedish Research Council (https://www.vr.se/english.html) HB, 2018-00470 ALF Funding Region Örebro County (HB) OLL-930268 The Swedish state under the agreement between the Swedish government and the county councils, the ALF-agreement , (VS), GBG-823211, ALFGBG-932692 Nyckelfonden,Region Örebro County, HB), OLL-597601 Region Örebro County Research committee (HB), OLL-693551, OLL-786911 Regional Research committee Uppsala-Örebro (HB), RFR-749241 Stiftelsen Mary von Sydows, född Wijk, donation fund, (VS), numbers 1017, 4917, 2618, and 3718) Clinical therapy research, Region Stockholm County, The Centre of Clinical Research, (ESL), Västmanland County Council, (MdB), LTV-966501 Research Funds of Skåne University Hospital and the Skåne County Council Research and Development Foundation (KB), REGSKANE-622891.

Available from: 2024-07-09 Created: 2024-07-09 Last updated: 2024-07-09Bibliographically approved
Karlqvist, S., Sachs, M., Eriksson, C., Cao, Y., Montgomery, S., Ludvigsson, J. F., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2024). Comparative risk of serious infection with vedolizumab vs anti-TNF in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from nationwide Swedish registers. Paper presented at 19th Congress of ECCO, Stockholm, Sweden, February 21-24, 2024. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 18(Suppl. 1), I1291-I1293, Article ID P680.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative risk of serious infection with vedolizumab vs anti-TNF in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from nationwide Swedish registers
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 18, no Suppl. 1, p. I1291-I1293, article id P680Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The real-world comparative safety of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. We aimed to assess the risk of serious infection in IBD patients treated with vedolizumab, compared to (i) those treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment and (ii) the general population.

Methods: In this nationwide cohort study, treatment episodes were identified from Swedish health registers (from 1 May 2014 – 31 December 2020). Patients were considered exposed from initiation of treatment until 90 days after discontinuation of treatment. We used Cox regression with propensity score-matched cohorts to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident serious infection, defined as infection requiring hospital admission.

Results: After propensity score matching, the cohorts were not materially different at baseline with regard to demographic, disease and treatment characteristics (Table 1). During 1376 treatment-episodes in patients with Crohn’s disease, there were 5.18 (95%CI: 3.98-6.63) serious infections per 100 person-years (PY) with vedolizumab vs 3.54 (95%CI: 2.50-4.85) per 100 PY with anti-TNF; HR 1.72 (95%CI: 1.12-2.65; Figure 1A). When examining site-specific infections in Crohn’s disease, vedolizumab was associated with an HR of 2.47 (95% CI: 0.96-6.39) for serious gastrointestinal infections. Compared to the rate of 0.75 (95%CI: 0.59-0.92) serious infections per 100 PY in the general population, vedolizumab demonstrated an increased HR of 7.00 (95%CI: 5.04-9.72).

Across 1294 episodes among patients with ulcerative colitis there were 3.74 (95%CI: 2.66-5.11) serious infections per 100 PY with vedolizumab vs 3.42 (95%CI: 2.31-4.89) per 100 PY with anti-TNF, corresponding to HRs of 0.80 (95%CI: 0.47-1.36, Figure 1B) within the initial 1.1 years of treatment and 2.03 (95%CI: 0.65-6.32) after 1.1 years (follow-up truncated due to non-proportional hazards). In ulcerative colitis, there was no statistically significant association between vedolizumab treatment and any of the site-specific serious infections. Compared to the rate of 0.69 (95%CI: 0.53-0.87) serious infections per 100 PY in the general population, vedolizumab showed an increased HR of 5.45 (95%CI: 3.67-8.11).

Conclusion: Vedolizumab was associated with higher hazard ratios of serious infections compared to anti-TNF in Crohn’s disease, but not in ulcerative colitis. Nonetheless, in both IBD subtypes vedolizumab exhibited increased hazard ratios compared to the general population. These results underscore the importance of heightened clinical awareness of infections in vedolizumab-treated patients and may help clinicians understanding the optimal positioning of vedolizumab.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-113289 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjad212.0810 (DOI)001189928901172 ()
Conference
19th Congress of ECCO, Stockholm, Sweden, February 21-24, 2024
Available from: 2024-04-19 Created: 2024-04-19 Last updated: 2024-04-19Bibliographically approved
Hillert, J., Bove, R., Haddad, L. B., Hellwig, K., Houtchens, M., Magyari, M., . . . Simoni, M. (2024). Expert opinion on the use of contraception in people with multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Article ID 13524585241228103.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expert opinion on the use of contraception in people with multiple sclerosis
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2024 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, article id 13524585241228103Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Current guidance on the selection of appropriate contraception for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) is lacking.

OBJECTIVE: To address this gap, an expert-led consensus program developed recommendations to support clinicians in discussing family planning and contraception with women and men with multiple sclerosis (MS).

METHODS: A multidisciplinary steering committee (SC) of 13 international clinical experts led the program, supported by an extended faculty of 32 experts representing 18 countries. A modified Delphi methodology was used for decision-making and consensus-building. The SC drafted 15 clinical questions focused on patient-centered care, selection of contraception, and timing of stopping/starting contraception and disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). Statements addressing each question were drafted based on evaluation of published evidence and the experts' clinical experience. Consensus was reached if ⩾75% of respondents agreed (scoring 7-9 on a 9-point scale) with each recommendation.

RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 24 of 25 proposed recommendations, including how and when to discuss contraception, types and safety of contraceptives, and how to evaluate the most appropriate contraceptive options for specific patient groups, including those with significant disability or being treated with DMTs.

CONCLUSION: These expert recommendations provide the first practical, relevant, and comprehensive guidance for clinicians on the selection of contraception in PwMS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
Keywords
Multiple sclerosis, consensus, contraception, disease-modifying therapy, expert opinion, reproductive health
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-112408 (URN)10.1177/13524585241228103 (DOI)001180933100001 ()38456514 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-03-19 Created: 2024-03-19 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Arribas, C., Cavallaro, G., Gonzalez, J.-L., Lagares, C., Raffaeli, G., Smits, A., . . . Garrido, F. (2024). Global cross-sectional survey on neonatal pharmacologic sedation and analgesia practices and pain assessment tools: impact of the sociodemographic index (SDI). Pediatric Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global cross-sectional survey on neonatal pharmacologic sedation and analgesia practices and pain assessment tools: impact of the sociodemographic index (SDI)
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2024 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is variability in the use of sedatives and analgesics in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). We aimed to investigate the use of analgesics and sedatives and the management of neonatal pain and distress.

Methods: This was a global, prospective, cross-sectional study. A survey was distributed May–November 2022. The primary outcome of this research was to compare results between countries depending on their socio-sanitary level using the sociodemographic index (SDI). We organized results based on geographical location.

Results: The survey collected 1304 responses, but we analyzed 924 responses after database cleaning. Responses from 98 different countries were analyzed. More than 60% of NICUs reported having an analgosedation guideline, and one-third of respondents used neonatal pain scales in more than 80% of neonates. We found differences in the management of sedation and analgesia between NICUs on different continents, but especially between countries with different SDIs. Countries with a higher SDI had greater availability of and adherence to analgosedation guidelines, as well as higher rates of analgosedation for painful or distressing procedures. Countries with different SDIs reported differences in analgosedation for neonatal intubation, invasive ventilation, and therapeutic hypothermia, among others.

Conclusions: Socio-economic status of countries impacts on neonatal analgosedation management.

Keywords
Newborn infant, pain, survey
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111609 (URN)10.1038/s41390-024-03032-7 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-02-15 Created: 2024-02-15 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Vingeliene, S., Hiyoshi, A., Lentjes, M., Brummer, R. J., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2024). Hospital-treated infections and subsequent Parkinson's disease risk: a register-based sibling comparison study. Brain Communications, 6(2), Article ID fcae098.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital-treated infections and subsequent Parkinson's disease risk: a register-based sibling comparison study
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2024 (English)In: Brain Communications, E-ISSN 2632-1297, Vol. 6, no 2, article id fcae098Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serious infections may result in greater risk of Parkinson's disease. However, high-quality cohort studies focusing on a potential causal role of different types and sites of infection are lacking. Gastrointestinal infections are of a particular interest due to growing evidence implicating gut dysbiosis in Parkinson's disease aetiology. This population-based cohort study used the Swedish Total Population Register to identify individuals born during 1944-77 and resident in Sweden between 1990 and 2018 (N = 3 698 319). Hospital-treated infections at ages 21-30 and 31-40 years were identified from the National Patient Register. Participants were followed to identify Parkinson's disease diagnoses from age 41 years up to December 31, 2018, when the oldest individual reached 75 years. Cox regression with a sibling comparison design to tackle familial genetic and environmental confounding was used to derive hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for each infection site, type, or any infections at ages 21-30 and 31-40 years. During a median follow-up of 15.4 years, 8815 unique Parkinson's disease diagnoses were accrued, with a crude rate of 17.3 (95% confidence interval 17.0, 17.7) per 100 000 person-years. After controlling for shared familial factors, hospital-treated gastrointestinal and respiratory infections between 21 and 30 years of age were associated with a greater risk of Parkinson's disease [hazard ratios 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.75) and 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.95), respectively]; no association was found for any infections at age 31-40 [hazard ratio 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 0.93, 1.19)]. After adjustment, no statistically significant associations were observed for other sites including genitourinary and skin. These findings suggest that hospital-treated infections of the gastrointestinal tract and lungs, both of which may have an influence on the gut microbiome, by age 30 years may be risk factors for Parkinson's disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
Keywords
Cohort study, neurodegeneration
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-112916 (URN)10.1093/braincomms/fcae098 (DOI)38562309 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01236Nyckelfonden
Note

This study was supported by grants from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (Forte) (grant number 2019-01236), Nyckelfonden and the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to the International Centre for Life Course Studies (ES/R008930/1).

Available from: 2024-04-08 Created: 2024-04-08 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Shrestha, S., Brand, J. S., Osooli, M., Eriksson, C., Schoultz, I., Askling, J., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2024). Spondyloarthritis in first-degree relatives and spouses of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A nationwide population-based cohort study from Sweden. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, Article ID jjae041.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spondyloarthritis in first-degree relatives and spouses of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A nationwide population-based cohort study from Sweden
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, article id jjae041Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Register-based research suggests a shared pathophysiology between inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] and spondyloarthritis [SpA], but the role of familial [genetic and environmental] factors in this shared susceptibility is largely unknown. We compared the risk of SpA in first-degree relatives [FDRs] and spouses of IBD patients with FDRs and spouses of matched population-based reference individuals.

METHODS: We identified 147,080 FDRs and 25,945 spouses of patients with incident IBD [N=39,203] during 2006-2016 and 1,453,429 FDRs and 258,098 spouses of matched reference individuals [N=390,490], by linking nationwide Swedish registers and gastrointestinal biopsy data. Study participants were followed 1987-2017. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios [HRs] of SpA.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 2,430 FDRs of IBD patients [6.5/10,000 person-years] and 17,761 FDRs of reference individuals [4.8/10,000 person-years] were diagnosed with SpA, corresponding to an HR of 1.35 [95%CI:1.29,1.41]. In subgroup analyses, the increased risk of SpA was most pronounced in FDRs of Crohn's disease patients [HR=1.44; 95%CI:1.34,1.56] and of IBD patients aged <18 years at diagnosis [HR=1.46; 95%CI: 1.27,1.68]. IBD patient's spouses also had a higher SpA rate than reference individuals' spouses, but the difference was less pronounced [4.3 vs. 3.5/10,000 person-years; HR=1.22; 95%CI:1.09,1.37]. No subgroup-specific risk pattern was identified among spouses.

CONCLUSIONS: The observed shared familial risks between IBD and SpA support shared genetic factors in their pathogenesis. However, spouses of IBD patients were also at increased risk for SpA, reflecting the influence of environmental exposures or similarities in health-seeking patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
Keywords
epidemiology, first-degree relatives, inflammatory bowel diseases, spondyloarthritis, spouses, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-112556 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjae041 (DOI)001198352900001 ()38518097 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 754285Region Örebro County, OLL-936004; OLL-890291; OLL-790011; OLL- 723021Swedish Research Council, 2020-02021
Note

Funding agency:

Danish National Research Foundation DNRF148

Available from: 2024-03-25 Created: 2024-03-25 Last updated: 2024-04-15Bibliographically approved
Smith, C., Hiyoshi, A., Hasselgren, M., Sandelowsky, H., Ställberg, B. & Montgomery, S. (2024). The Increased Burden of Morbidity Over the Life-Course Among Patients with COPD: A Register-Based Cohort Study in Sweden. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 19, 1375-1389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Increased Burden of Morbidity Over the Life-Course Among Patients with COPD: A Register-Based Cohort Study in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 19, p. 1375-1389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have other chronic disorders. This study aims to describe the life-course pattern of morbidity in patients with COPD.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among all residents aged 50-90 years in Sweden in 1997, people with a hospital COPD diagnosis were identified using Swedish national registers (1997-2018). Each patient with COPD was matched by sex, birthyear and county of residency with up to five COPD-free controls. Other chronic disease diagnoses were identified during 1987-2018. Conditional logistic regression calculated risk of diseases diagnosed prior to first COPD diagnosis, producing odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Cox regression estimated risk of diagnoses after first COPD diagnosis, producing hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI.

RESULTS: Among 2,706,814 individuals, 225,159 (8.3%) had COPD. The nested case-control sample included 223,945 COPD-cases with 1,062,731 controls. Prior to first COPD diagnosis, future COPD patients had higher risks than controls for most examined conditions. Highest risks were seen for chronic heart failure (OR = 3.25, 3.20-3.30), peripheral arterial disease (OR = 3.12, 3.06-3.18) and lung cancer (OR = 12.73, 12.12-13.37). Following the COPD diagnosis, individuals with COPD had higher risks of most conditions than individuals without COPD. Chronic heart failure (HR = 3.50, 3.46-3.53), osteoporosis (HR = 3.35, 3.30-3.42), depression (HR = 2.58, 2.53-2.64) and lung cancer (HR = 6.04, 5.90-6.18) predominated. The risk of vascular dementia was increased after COPD diagnosis (HR = 1.53, 1.48-1.58) but not Alzheimer's disease.

CONCLUSION: Accumulation of chronic morbidity may precede COPD. Following the diagnosis, an increased burden of cardiovascular disease and cancer is to be expected, but subsequent depression, osteoporosis, and vascular dementia should also be noted. Management strategies for patients with COPD should consider the higher-than-average risk of multimorbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press, 2024
Keywords
COPD, multimorbidity, register-study
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-114391 (URN)10.2147/COPD.S459784 (DOI)38912053 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01236
Available from: 2024-06-25 Created: 2024-06-25 Last updated: 2024-06-25Bibliographically approved
Vingeliene, S., Hiyoshi, A., Lentjes, M., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2023). Ageing accounts for much of the association between decreasing grip strength and subsequent loneliness: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 77(3), 175-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing accounts for much of the association between decreasing grip strength and subsequent loneliness: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Loneliness at older ages has been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. One of the risk factors for loneliness may be age-related decline in skeletal muscle strength, which may limit the possibilities for engagement in usual social activities and maintaining relationships. We aimed to identify if decrease in grip strength is an independent determinant of subsequent change in loneliness.

METHODS: Prospective cohort study of participants aged 50 years or older living in private households and provided data in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing waves 2 (2004/2005), 4 (2008/2009) and 6 (2012/2013) (n=6118). We used fixed effects linear models to estimate β coefficients and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS: The adjusted estimates for a 5-kilogramme decrease in grip strength and loneliness score (ranging from 3 to 9) are β 0.04 and 95% CI -0.003 to 0.08 among men and β 0.03 and 95% CI -0.02 to 0.09 among women. In age-stratified analysis, a statistically significant association was observed among men below the age of 80 years (0.04, 0.0001 to 0.08) but not among older men (0.04, -0.28 to 0.35), and among women below the age of 80 years (0.03, -0.002 to 0.09) or above (-0.02, -0.32 to 0.28).

CONCLUSION: Muscle strength declines with age and may help explain the greater social isolation that occurs at older ages. Decline in strength was only independently associated with modestly increased loneliness among men younger than 80 years of age, indicating its limitation as a potential marker of loneliness risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Aging, epidemiology, gerontology, longitudinal studies, public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-97904 (URN)10.1136/jech-2021-218635 (DOI)000766735700001 ()35256526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142665246 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Orebro University doctoral studentship MV3028

Available from: 2022-03-09 Created: 2022-03-09 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6328-5494

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