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Hugelius, K., Becker, J. & Adolfsson, A. (2020). Five Challenges When Managing Mass Casualty or Disaster Situations: A Review Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(9), Article ID 3068.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five Challenges When Managing Mass Casualty or Disaster Situations: A Review Study
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 9, article id 3068Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Managing mass casualty or disaster incidents is challenging to any person or organisation. Therefore, this paper identifies and describes common challenges to managing such situations, using case and lessons learned reports. It focuses on sudden onset, man-made or technologically caused mass casualty or disaster situations.

Methods: A management review was conducted based on a structured search in the PubMed andWeb of Science databases.

Results:The review included 20 case—and lessons learned reports covering natural disasters, man-made events, and accidents across Europe, the United States of Amerika (USA), Asia and the Middle East. Five common challenges were identified: (1) to identify the situation and deal with uncertainty, (2) to balance the mismatch between the contingency plan and the reality, (3) to establish a functional crisis organization, (4) to adapt the medical response to the actual and overall situation and (5) to ensure a resilient response.

Conclusions: The challenges when managing mass casualty or disaster events involved were mainly related to the ability to manage uncertainty and surprising situations, using structured processes to respond. The ability to change mind set, organization and procedures, both from an organizational- and individual perspective, was essential. Non-medical factors and internal factors influenced the medical management. In order to respond in an eective, timely and resilient way, all these factors should be taken into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
mass casualty situation, crises management, disaster management, incident command, contingency planning, disaster response
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-81383 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17093068 (DOI)32354076 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084009973 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-28 Created: 2020-04-28 Last updated: 2020-05-08Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K., Semrau, M. & Holmefur, M. (2020). HESPER web - development and reliability evaluation of a web-based version of the humanitarian emergency settings perceived needs scale. BMC Public Health, 20(1), Article ID 323.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HESPER web - development and reliability evaluation of a web-based version of the humanitarian emergency settings perceived needs scale
2020 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs Scale (HESPER) assesses a wide range of physical, psychological and social perceived needs across 26 questions, and can be used in humanitarian emergencies and disasters for needs assessment or research studies. The original HESPER collects data through individual interviews. Today, a large number of people have access to the internet, including in humanitarian emergencies and disasters. Therefore, this paper aimed to report the development, reliability evaluation and feasibility evaluation of the HESPER Web.

Methods: First, the original HESPER was developed into a web based survey. Thereafter, alternate forms reliability between the HESPER and HESPER Web, and test-retest reliability for the HESPER Web, was evaluated using a study sample of 85 asylum seekers in Sweden in total.

Results: The alternate forms reliability evaluation showed that the HESPER Web was a reliable instrument to assess perceived needs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for total number of serious needs was 0.96 (CI 0.93–09.98, p < 0.001). Cohen’s κ was used to analyse the alternate forms reliability between the HESPER and HESPER Web item per item; the correspondence between HESPER and HESPER Web varied between 0.54 and 1.0 for the 26 questions. There was a strong nominal association in first priority need between the HESPER and HESPER Web (Cramer’s V 0.845, p < 0.001). In the test-retest reliability evaluation of HESPER Web, ICC was 0.98 (CI 0.97–0.99, p < 0.001), and Cohen’s κ varied between 0.53 and 1.0. There was a strong nominal association in first priority need between test and re-test (Cramer’s V 0.93, p < 0.001). The HESPER Web was experienced as easy and safe to use and was found less time consuming than the original HESPER interview, according to the study participants.

Conclusion: The HESPER Web is a reliable and usable instrument to assess perceived needs. It can reduce a number of practical challenges both for needs assessment in disasters or humanitarian emergencies as well as in research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020
Keywords
Needs assessment, Public health, Mental health, Humanitarian, Alternate forms reliability, Web based surveys
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80647 (URN)10.1186/s12889-020-8387-4 (DOI)000521104500002 ()2-s2.0-85081928979 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Wellcome trust
Note

Funding Agency:

Elrha’s Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) Program

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

Örebro University  

UK Government (DFID) 

Available from: 2020-03-13 Created: 2020-03-13 Last updated: 2020-04-07Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K. (2019). HESPER Web; A web based survey to assess experienced needs in disasters and humanitarian emergencies. In: : . Paper presented at WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Brisbane, Australia, May 7-10, 2019. Brisbane, Australia: World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HESPER Web; A web based survey to assess experienced needs in disasters and humanitarian emergencies
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brisbane, Australia: World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), 2019
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73437 (URN)
Conference
WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Brisbane, Australia, May 7-10, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, U., Jaensson, M., Dahlberg, K. & Hugelius, K. (2019). Postoperative recovery after general and regional anesthesia in patients undergoing day surgery: A mixed methods study. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 34(3), 517-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative recovery after general and regional anesthesia in patients undergoing day surgery: A mixed methods study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 517-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate differences and describe experiences of postoperative recovery after day surgery between patients undergoing general anesthesia (GA) versus regional anesthesia (RA).

Design: A mixed methods design.

Methods: Day surgery patients (N = 401) were included. Postoperative recovery was assessed daily for 14 days using the Swedish Web Version of the Quality of Recovery questionnaire included in a mobile application. In addition, qualitative interviews were completed with 20 day surgery patients. Quantitative and qualitative data were first analyzed separately and then merged.

Findings: There were significant differences in Swedish Web Version of the Quality of Recovery between GA and RA on days 1 to 13 (P < .05). These findings could not be confirmed in the qualitative findings, except for psychological issues as well as tiredness and fatigue. Unexpected issues contributed to a greater extent to the theme not feeling well Pain in the surgical wound was overall the biggest problem.

Conclusions: There seems to be a poorer recovery after GA compared with RA. Tiredness or fatigue is present also after minor surgery in RA. Unexpected issues affect recovery negatively, and therefore should be addressed by health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
day surgery, fatigue, mixed methods, patient experience, patient-reported outcomes, postoperative
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68568 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.08.003 (DOI)000469462400009 ()30470465 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057033263 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-4765Swedish Research Council, 2015-02273
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Hodza-Beganovic, R., Berggren, P., Hugelius, K. & Edelbring, S. (2019). Survey-based experiential learning - means of raising professional awareness in developing countries. European Journal of Public Health, 29(Suppl. 4), 586-586, Article ID ckz186.547.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survey-based experiential learning - means of raising professional awareness in developing countries
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no Suppl. 4, p. 586-586, article id ckz186.547Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Healthcare in post-war Balkans is still under development. Healthcare changes towards more complex clinical scenarios that need different competencies around patients. This study reports on survey based learning to increasing professional awareness for developing sustainable healthcare settings using an experiential learning approach.

Methods: In this study, researchers and educators identified non-technical skills concepts on individual, team, and organizational levels. These concepts were contextualized into the local setting through interactive workshops. Two pediatric surgery clinics in Kosovo and Bosnia and Herzegovina participated who were part of an international clinical skills training project. The tools and surveys were: Johari window, Kolb’s learning style questionnaire, team members exchange quality scale, the IPEC framework for interprofessional competence, Team STEPPS observation tool and organizational models.

Results: A model is developed for contextualizing core concepts on professional awareness into a local developing healthcare setting. It entails three steps conducted in consecutive workshops: Identifying research-based concepts on professional compe-tence on individual, team and organizational levels. Facilitating local contextualization of these concepts by using surveys in interactive workshops. Agreeing on indicators to maintain high professional awareness.

Conclusions: Capacity-building in public health can be conducted through increasing professional awareness. Professional awareness can be approached in individual, team and organizational dimensions. Established core concepts of non-technical skills can be contextualized in other cultures through a survey-based experiential learning approach.

Key messages:

  • Professional individual, team and organizational awareness is a vital part of conducting efficient healthcare.
  • The professional awareness can be enhanced through processing core concepts in a local context through facilitated workshops.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78496 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckz186.547 (DOI)000506895305069 ()
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K. (2019). The HOPE model for disaster nursing: a result from a systematic literature review. In: : . Paper presented at WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Brisbane, Australia, May 7-10, 2019. Brisbane, Australia: World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The HOPE model for disaster nursing: a result from a systematic literature review
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brisbane, Australia: World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), 2019
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73435 (URN)
Conference
WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Brisbane, Australia, May 7-10, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K. & Adolfsson, A. (2019). The HOPE model for disaster nursing: A systematic literature review. International Emergency Nursing, 45, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The HOPE model for disaster nursing: A systematic literature review
2019 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Disaster management, Disaster nursing, Disasters, Hope, Mass casualty situations, Nursing models, Systematic review
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73899 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2019.03.007 (DOI)000474811300001 ()31005569 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064325827 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K., Adams, M. & Romo-Murphy, E. (2019). The Power of Radio to Promote Health and Resilience in Natural Disasters: A Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(14), Article ID E2526.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Power of Radio to Promote Health and Resilience in Natural Disasters: A Review
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 14, article id E2526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humanitarian radio has been used in humanitarian aid efforts and after natural disasters over the last 15 years. However, the effects have barely been evaluated, and there are few scientific reports on the impact of radio as a disaster health response intervention. Therefore, this study aimed to provide an overview of the use and impact of humanitarian radio in natural disasters from a health perspective. A literature review of 13 scientific papers and grey literature resources was conducted. The results show that humanitarian radio could be used to promote both physical and psychosocial wellbeing by providing health-related information, advice and psychosocial support in natural disasters. Community resilience can be enhanced by the promotion of community engagement and can strengthen self-efficacy and community efficacy. Radio also has the potential to cost-effectively reach a large number of affected people in areas with severely damaged infrastructure. Radio could, therefore, contribute to health recovery and wellbeing from both individual and community perspectives. As such, health professionals; crises communication professionals, including radio journalists; and disaster-managing stakeholders should be prepared and trained to use humanitarian radio as an integrated part of the disaster health response in natural disasters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Community resilience, crises communication, disaster, disaster response, humanitarian radio, mental health
National Category
Other Health Sciences Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75189 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16142526 (DOI)000480659300079 ()31311142 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069998471 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-21 Created: 2019-07-21 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K. (2018). The link between disaster radio and health in disaster affected commmunities. In: World Radio Day, UN Geneva: . Paper presented at World Radio Day 2018, Geneva, Switzerland, February 13, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The link between disaster radio and health in disaster affected commmunities
2018 (English)In: World Radio Day, UN Geneva, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Other Health Sciences Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65020 (URN)
Conference
World Radio Day 2018, Geneva, Switzerland, February 13, 2018
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Hugelius, K., Adolfsson, A., Örtenwall, P. & Gifford, M. (2017). Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 32(2), 117-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster
2017 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In November 2013, the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the Philippines. The typhoon caused severe damage to the medical facilities and many injuries and deaths. Health professionals have a crucial role in the immediate disaster response system, but knowledge of their experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster is limited. Aim The aim of this study was to explore health professionals' experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster.

Method: Eight health professionals were interviewed five months after the disaster. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutic methods.

Results: The main theme, being professional and survivor, described both positive and negative emotions and experiences from being both a helper, as part of the responding organization, and a victim, as part of the surviving but severely affected community. Sub-themes described feelings of strength and confidence, feelings of adjustment and acceptance, feelings of satisfaction, feelings of powerless and fear, feelings of guilt and shame, and feelings of loneliness.

Conclusion: Being a health professional during a natural disaster was a multi-faceted, powerful, and ambiguous experience of being part of the response system at the same time as being a survivor of the disaster. Personal values and altruistic motives as well as social aspects and stress-coping strategies to reach a balance between acceptance and control were important elements of the experience. Based on these findings, implications for disaster training and response strategies are suggested. Hugelius K , Adolfsson A , Örtenwall P , Gifford M . Being both helpers and victims: health professionals' experiences of working during a natural disaster.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
disaster medicine; disasters; health professionals; phenomenological hermeneutic method; relief work
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54391 (URN)10.1017/S1049023X16001412 (DOI)000398228600002 ()28043240 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007572037 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Fortifikationsföreningens Forskningsfond (Foundation of Fortification-Related Research)

Örebro County Council Research Committee (Örebro, Sweden)

Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0534-4593

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