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Dahlberg, K., Jaensson, M. & Nilsson, U. (2019). “Let the patient decide” – person-centered postoperative follow-up contacts, initiated via a phone app after day surgery: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Surgery, 33-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Let the patient decide” – person-centered postoperative follow-up contacts, initiated via a phone app after day surgery: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1743-9191, E-ISSN 1743-9159, p. 33-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing day surgery are expected to manage their recovery on their own. Follow-up routines differ, but many patients have expressed a need for more professional support during recovery. The aim of this study was to describe how many follow-up contacts were initiated, and when and why, via a digital solution. Also, we wanted to compare postoperative recovery and characteristics between patients requesting, and patients not requesting, contact.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a multicenter, two-group, parallel randomized controlled trial. Participants used a digital solution called "Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP)" for initiating follow-up contacts after day surgery. The quality of postoperative recovery was measured with the Swedish web-version of Quality of Recovery.

RESULTS: Of 494 patients, 84 (17%) initiated contact via RAPP. The most common reasons for initiating contact were related to the surgical wound and pain. Contacts were initiated across the 14-day assessment period, with 62% (62/100) in the first postoperative week. The RAPP contact group had significantly poorer postoperative recovery on days 1-14 compared to those not requesting contact via RAPP (p < 0.001). There was a significantly higher proportion of patients who had undergone general anesthesia in the RAPP contact group (85% [71/84]) compared to the non-RAPP contact group (71% [291/410]), p = 0.003.

CONCLUSION: Letting the patient decide him/herself whether, and when, contact and support is needed during the postoperative period, is possible and does not increase the frequency of contacts. This study investigates a digital solution, RAPP, as one example of a person-centered approach that can be implemented in day surgery follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Ambulatory surgery, Follow-up, eHealth
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70268 (URN)10.1016/j.ijsu.2018.11.022 (DOI)000455016300005 ()30503602 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057781234 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02273Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-4765
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Hälleberg Nyman, M., Nilsson, U., Dahlberg, K. & Jaensson, M. (2018). Association Between Functional Health Literacy and Postoperative Recovery, Health Care Contacts, and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients Undergoing Day Surgery Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Surgery, 153(8), 738-745
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Functional Health Literacy and Postoperative Recovery, Health Care Contacts, and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients Undergoing Day Surgery Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial
2018 (English)In: JAMA Surgery, ISSN 2168-6254, E-ISSN 2168-6262, Vol. 153, no 8, p. 738-745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Day surgery puts demands on the patients to manage their own recovery at home according to given instructions. Low health literacy levels are shown to be associated with poorer health outcomes.

Objective: To describe functional health literacy levels among patients in Sweden undergoing day surgery and to describe the association between functional health literacy (FHL) and health care contacts, quality of recovery (SwQoR), and health-related quality of life.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This observational study was part of a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of patients undergoing day surgery and was performed in multiple centers from October 2015 to July 2016 and included 704 patients.

Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was SwQoR in the FHL groups 14 days after surgery. Secondary end points were health care contacts, EuroQol-visual analog scales, and the Short Form (36) Health Survey in the FHL groups.

Results: Of 704 patients (418 [59.4%] women; mean [SD] age with inadequate or problematic FHL levels, 47 [16] years and 49 [15.1], respectively), 427 (60.7%) reported sufficient FHL, 223 (31.7%) problematic FHL, and 54 (7.7%) inadequate FHL. The global score of SwQoR indicated poor recovery in both inadequate (37.4) and problematic (22.9) FHL. There was a statistically significant difference in the global score of SwQoR (SD) between inadequate (37.4 [34.7]) and sufficient FHL (17.7 [21.0]) (P < .001). The patients with inadequate or problematic FHL had a lower health-related quality of life than the patients with sufficient FHL in terms of EuroQol-visual analog scale scores (mean [SD], 73 [19.1], 73 [19.1], and 78 [17.4], respectively; P = .008), physical function (mean [SD], 72 [22.7], 75 [23.8], and 81 [21.9], respectively; P < .001), bodily pain (mean [SD], 51 [28.7], 53 [27.4], and 61 [27.0], respectively; P = .001), vitality (mean [SD], 50 [26.7], 56 [23.5], and 62 [25.4], respectively; P < .001), social functioning (mean [SD], 73 [28.2], 81 [21.8], and 84 [23.3], respectively; P = .004), mental health (mean [SD], 65 [25.4], 73 [21.2], and 77 [21.2], respectively; P < .001), and physical component summary (mean [SD], 41 [11.2], 42 [11.3], and 45 [10.1], respectively; P = .004). There were no differences between the FHL groups regarding health care contacts.

Conclusions and Relevance: Inadequate FHL in patients undergoing day surgery was associated with poorer postoperative recovery and a lower health-related quality of life. Health literacy is a relevant factor to consider for optimizing the postoperative recovery in patients undergoing day surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66778 (URN)10.1001/jamasurg.2018.0672 (DOI)000441758600015 ()29710226 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051572829 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-4765Swedish Research Council, 2015-02273
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Frost, E., Kihlgren, A. & Jaensson, M. (2018). Experience of physician and nurse specialists in Sweden undertaking long distance aeromedical transportation of critically ill patients: A qualitative study. International Emergency Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of physician and nurse specialists in Sweden undertaking long distance aeromedical transportation of critically ill patients: A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Transportation of critically ill patients, intra- or inter-hospital, always involves risks when resources are limited. With aeromedical transports, additional risk factors are incurred. The physiological effects of altitude, when both pressure and density decline, can lead to hypobaric hypoxia and gases trapped in body cavities will expand and cause stress on biological tissue.

AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nurse and physician specialists in Sweden undertaking long distance aeromedical transport of critically ill patients, with a flight time of more than two hours.

METHOD: A qualitative approach with a descriptive design. Thirteen recorded semi-structured interviews with physician and nurse specialists were analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: One overall theme emerged, To be one step ahead to ensure patient safety in the air; with three categories 1) With the patient in focus, 2) To be part of a team and concerned about patient safety and 3) To be in need of recovery.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the challenges with long distance aeromedical transport of critically ill patients. The healthcare personnel make decisions and actions to be one step ahead to ensure patient safety. This isolated work is improved with experience, education, training and good communication skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Aeromedical transport, Communication, Content analysis, Crew resource management, Critical care, Patient safety, Qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71190 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2018.11.004 (DOI)30583952 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, K., Jaensson, M., Nilsson, U., Eriksson, M. & Odencrants, S. (2018). Holding It Together - Patients' Perspectives on Postoperative Recovery When Using an e-Assessed Follow-Up: Qualitative Study. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 20(5), Article ID e10387.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holding It Together - Patients' Perspectives on Postoperative Recovery When Using an e-Assessed Follow-Up: Qualitative Study
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2018 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 20, no 5, article id e10387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is an emerging trend to perform surgeries as day surgery. After a day surgery, most of the recovery period takes place at home, and patients are responsible for their own recovery. It has been suggested that electronic health (eHealth) technologies can support patients in this process. A mobile app has recently been developed to assess and follow up on postoperative recovery after a day surgery.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore experiences associated with postoperative recovery after a day surgery in patients using a mobile app to assess the quality of their recovery.

Methods: This is a qualitative interview study with an explorative and descriptive design. Participants were recruited from 4 different day surgery units in different parts of Sweden. The study included 18 participants aged >17 years who had undergone day surgery and used the Recovery Assessment by Phone Points, a mobile app for follow-up on postoperative recovery after day surgery. Participants were purposively selected to ensure maximum variation. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: A total of two themes and six subthemes emerged from the data: (1) the theme Give it all you’ve got with the subthemes Believing in own capacity, Being prepared, and Taking action, where participants described their possibilities of participating and themselves contributing to improving their postoperative recovery; and (2) the theme The importance of feeling safe and sound with the subthemes Feeling safe and reassured, Not being acknowledged, and Not being left alone, which describe the importance of support from health care professionals and next of kin.

Conclusions: It is important that patients feel safe, reassured, and acknowledged during their postoperative recovery. They can achieve this themselves with sufficient support and information from the health care organization and their next of kin. Using a mobile app, both for assessment and to enable contact with the day surgery unit during the postoperative recovery period, can improve care and create a feeling of not being alone after surgery. We propose that postoperative recovery starts in the prerecovery phase when patients prepare for their recovery to get the best possible outcome from their surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications Inc., 2018
Keywords
Ambulatory surgical procedures, mobile apps, postoperative period, qualitative research
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67100 (URN)10.2196/10387 (DOI)000433585700001 ()2-s2.0-85047567613 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-4765Swedish Research Council, 2015-02273
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Gillespie, B. M., Harbeck, E. B., Falk-Brynhildsen, K., Nilsson, U. & Jaensson, M. (2018). Perceptions of perioperative nursing competence: a cross-country comparison. BMC Nursing, 17, Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of perioperative nursing competence: a cross-country comparison
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2018 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Throughout many countries, professional bodies rely on yearly self-assessment of competence for ongoing registration; therefore, nursing competence is pivotal to safe clinical practice. Our aim was to describe and compare perioperative nurses' perceptions of competence in four countries, while examining the effect of specialist education and years of experience in the operating room.

Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional surveys from four countries including; Australia, Canada, Scotland, and Sweden. The 40-item Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised (PPCS-R), was used with a total sample of 768 respondents. We used a factorial design to examine the influence of country, years of experience in the operating room and specialist education on nurses' reported perceived perioperative competence.

Results: Regardless of country origin, nurses with specialist qualifications reported higher perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses without specialist education. However, cross-country differences were dependent on nurses' number of years of experience in the operating room. Nurses from Sweden with 6-10 years of experience in the operating room reported lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to Australian nurses. In comparing nurses with >10 years of experience, Swedish nurses reported significantly lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses from Australia, Canada and Scotland.

Conclusion: Researchers need to consider educational level and years of experience in the perioperative context when examining constructs such as competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Perioperative nursing; Competence; Cross-national; Survey; Patient safety
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66346 (URN)10.1186/s12912-018-0284-0 (DOI)000429063700001 ()29632435 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044847473 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, U., Jaensson, M., Dahlberg, K. & Hugelius, K. (2018). Postoperative recovery after general and regional anesthesia in patients undergoing day surgery: A mixed methods study. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative recovery after general and regional anesthesia in patients undergoing day surgery: A mixed methods study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473Article in journal (Refereed) In press
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68568 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.08.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Jaensson, M., Falk-Brynhildsen, K., Gillespie, B. M., Wallentin, F. Y. & Nilsson, U. (2018). Psychometric Validation of the Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised in the Swedish Context. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 33(4), 499-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Validation of the Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised in the Swedish Context
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 499-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To psychometrically test the Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised (PPCS-R) in the Swedish context.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Methods: The 40-item PPCS-R was translated into Swedish using a forward-translation approach. A census of 2,902 registered nurse anesthetists (RNAs) and operating room (OR) nurses was drawn from a database of a national association in Sweden.

Finding: The response rate was 39% (n = 1,033; 528 RNAs and 505 OR nurses). Cronbach alpha for each factor was 0.78 to 0.89 among OR nurses and 0.79 to 0.88 among RNAs. Confirmatory factor analysis showed good model fit in the six-factor model.

Conclusions: Psychometric testing of the Swedish translation of the PPCS-R suggests a good construct validity, and the construct and its six factors are conceptually relevant among the Swedish OR nurses and RNAs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
instrument development, nursing competence, advanced practice nursing, confirmatory factor analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56963 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2016.09.012 (DOI)000440398700104 ()30077294 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017190340 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Jaensson, M., Dahlberg, K. & Nilsson, U. (2018). Sex Similarities in Postoperative Recovery and Health Care Contacts Within 14 Days With mHealth Follow-Up: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(3), Article ID e2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex Similarities in Postoperative Recovery and Health Care Contacts Within 14 Days With mHealth Follow-Up: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial
2018 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 3, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have shown that women tend to have a poorer postanesthesia recovery than men. Our research group has developed a mobile phone app called Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP) that includes the Swedish Web version of the Quality of Recovery (SwQoR) questionnaire to monitor and assess postoperative recovery.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate sex differences in postoperative recovery and the number of health care contacts within 14 postoperative days in a cohort of day-surgery patients using RAPP.

Methods: This study was a secondary analysis from a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Therefore, we did not calculate an a priori sample size regarding sex differences. We conducted the study at 4 day-surgery settings in Sweden from October 2015 to July 2016. Included were 494 patients (220 male and 274 female participants) undergoing day surgery. The patients self-assessed their postoperative recovery for 14 postoperative days using the RAPP.

Results: There were no significant sex differences in postoperative recovery or the number of health care contacts. Subgroup analysis showed that women younger than 45 years reported significantly higher global scores in the SwQoR questionnaire (hence a poorer recovery) on postoperative days 1 to 10 than did women who were 45 years of age or older (P=.001 to P=.008). Men younger than 45 years reported significantly higher global scores on postoperative days 2 to 6 than did men 45 years of age or older (P=.001 to P=.006). Sex differences in postoperative recovery were not significant between the age groups.

Conclusions: This study found sex similarities in postoperative recovery and the number of health care contacts. However, subgroup analysis showed that age might be an independent factor for poorer recovery in both women and men. This knowledge can be used when informing patients what to expect after discharge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2018
Keywords
Sex, mHealth, telemedicine, mobile phone, cell phone, patient outcome assessment, postoperative complications, postoperative period
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66142 (URN)10.2196/periop.9874 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047537222 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Alm, F., Jaensson, M., Lundeberg, S. & Ericsson, E. (2017). Adherence to Swedish guidelines for pain treatment in relation to pediatric tonsil surgery: A survey of the multidisciplinary team. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 101, 123-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to Swedish guidelines for pain treatment in relation to pediatric tonsil surgery: A survey of the multidisciplinary team
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 101, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pain management in children after tonsil surgery is essential, and optimal pain treatment has been discussed for many years. Data from the National Tonsil Register in Sweden (NTRS) and a national mapping system have demonstrated the need for national pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery. As a result, Swedish national guidelines, together with updated patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se, were developed and implemented in 2013.

Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the professionals’ opinions of and adherence to pain treatment guidelines for pediatric tonsil surgery patients in a two-year follow-up.

Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was based on data from an inter-professional questionnaire, which was validated by an expert group using a content validity index (S-CVI 0.93). The questionnaire was sent to all Swedish ear, nose and throat (ENT) departments (n=49) that the NTRS identified as performing tonsil surgery on children younger than 18 years of age. In each clinic, we asked for responses from staff in each of the following professions: ENT physicians, anesthesia physicians, registered nurse anesthetists, and registered nurses in the ENT departments.

Results: Respondents from 48 ENT departments participated, and 139/163 (85%) completed questionnaires were returned. The guidelines were reported as being clear, ensuring patient safety and providing optimal pharmacological treatment. Treatment was given according to the guidelines: Half of the departments gave pre- or intraoperative treatment with clonidine, betamethasone and high-dose paracetamol (acetaminophen). A multimodal pain approach (paracetamol and COX inhibitors) after hospital discharge was prescribed by all departments after tonsillectomy and, more extensively, after tonsillotomy. One-third of the departments prescribed paracetamol with a higher normal dose for the first three postoperative days. Half of the departments prescribed rescue analgesics, clonidine or opioids after tonsillectomy. None of the departments prescribed codeine or tramadol, drugs that are discouraged in the guidelines. The majority of the departments used the website tonsilloperation.se to provide information to the patients and their caregivers.

Conclusion: The respondents' opinions of and the ENT departments adherence to the Swedish national guidelines were considered to be good. The national implementation process in Sweden has impacted the manner in which ENT departments treat pain after tonsil surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Children, Guidelines, Pain Management, Tonsillectomy, Tonsillotomy
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Pediatrics
Research subject
Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus; Oto-Rhino-Laryngology; Anaesthesiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59058 (URN)10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.07.040 (DOI)000413713100022 ()28964282 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026786151 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Effective postoperative pain management in children after tonsil surgery: barriers and possible solutions
Note

Funding agencies:

Research Committee at Region Örebro County

Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation OLL674631

Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, K., Philipsson, A., Hagberg, L., Jaensson, M., Hälleberg Nyman, M. & Nilsson, U. (2017). Cost-effectiveness of a systematic e-assessed follow-up of postoperative recovery after day surgery: a multicentre randomized trial. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 119(5), 1039-1046
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness of a systematic e-assessed follow-up of postoperative recovery after day surgery: a multicentre randomized trial
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1039-1046Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Most surgeries are done on a day-stay basis. Recovery assessment by phone points (RAPP) is a smartphonebased application (app) to evaluate patients after day surgery. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using RAPP for follow-up on postoperative recovery compared with standard care.

Methods: This study was a prospective parallel single-blind multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomly allocated to the intervention group using RAPP or the control group receiving standard care. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed based on individual data and included costs for the intervention, health effect [quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)], and costs or savings in health-care use.

Results: The mean cost for health-care consumption during 2 weeks after surgery was estimated at e37.29 for the intervention group and e60.96 for the control group. The mean difference was e23.66 (99% confidence interval 46.57 to0.76; P¼0.008). When including the costs of the intervention, the cost-effectiveness analysis showed net savings of e4.77 per patient in favour of the intervention. No difference in QALYs gained was seen between the groups (P¼0.75). The probability of the intervention being cost-effective was 71%.

Conclusions: This study shows that RAPP can be cost-effective but had no effect on QALY. RAPP can be a cost-effective toolin providing low-cost health-care contacts and in systematically assessing the quality of postoperative recovery.

Clinical trial registration:NCT02492191

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
Ambulatory surgery, cost effectiveness, mobile applications, postoperative period
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61954 (URN)10.1093/bja/aex332 (DOI)000413642900027 ()29077819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034731856 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-4765Swedish Research Council, 2015-02273
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7574-6745

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