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Eriksson, Mats, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5996-2584
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Publications (10 of 225) Show all publications
Arribas, C., Cavallaro, G., Gonzalez, J.-L., Lagares, C., Raffaeli, G., Smits, A., . . . Garrido, F. (2024). Global cross-sectional survey on neonatal pharmacologic sedation and analgesia practices and pain assessment tools: impact of the sociodemographic index (SDI). Pediatric Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global cross-sectional survey on neonatal pharmacologic sedation and analgesia practices and pain assessment tools: impact of the sociodemographic index (SDI)
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2024 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is variability in the use of sedatives and analgesics in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). We aimed to investigate the use of analgesics and sedatives and the management of neonatal pain and distress.

Methods: This was a global, prospective, cross-sectional study. A survey was distributed May–November 2022. The primary outcome of this research was to compare results between countries depending on their socio-sanitary level using the sociodemographic index (SDI). We organized results based on geographical location.

Results: The survey collected 1304 responses, but we analyzed 924 responses after database cleaning. Responses from 98 different countries were analyzed. More than 60% of NICUs reported having an analgosedation guideline, and one-third of respondents used neonatal pain scales in more than 80% of neonates. We found differences in the management of sedation and analgesia between NICUs on different continents, but especially between countries with different SDIs. Countries with a higher SDI had greater availability of and adherence to analgosedation guidelines, as well as higher rates of analgosedation for painful or distressing procedures. Countries with different SDIs reported differences in analgosedation for neonatal intubation, invasive ventilation, and therapeutic hypothermia, among others.

Conclusions: Socio-economic status of countries impacts on neonatal analgosedation management.

Keywords
Newborn infant, pain, survey
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111609 (URN)10.1038/s41390-024-03032-7 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-02-15 Created: 2024-02-15 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Runngren, E., Blomberg, K., Schollin-Ask, L., Appelqvist, E., Danielsson, M. & Eriksson, M. (2023). Attitudes and knowledge about HPV vaccination of school children and their parents following use of a targeted information. In: : . Paper presented at 35th International Papillomavirus Conference & Basic, Clinical and Public Health Scientific Workshops (IPVC 2023), Washington DC, USA, April 17-21, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and knowledge about HPV vaccination of school children and their parents following use of a targeted information
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background/Objective: This study aimed to investigate children’s’ and parents’ attitudes and knowledge about HPV (human papillomavirus) following introduction of gender-neutral HPV vaccination in the national immunization program (NIP) in Sweden. An evaluation of a tailored information package for parents and children launched by the Public Health Agency (PHAS) alongside the introduction of gender-neutral HPV vaccination was also performed 

Method: In total, 276 parents and 206 children from 22 School Health Services responded to a web-based survey, spring 2021 to January 2022.  

Result:  Overall, parents (78%) perceived HPV vaccination to be of importance for their child’s health. About half of the participating children and two thirds of the parents had used the tailored information package for the HPV vaccination. The fact sheet was mostly used by parents (55%) and children (20%) and also perceived as easy to understand (99% and 68% respectively). For both children and parents, the school nurse (70% respectively) was the primary source for information. The teacher (59%) was also a common source of information of HPV vaccination for the children.  

Conclusion: The school nurse is essential for informing about HPV vaccination for both children and parents. There is a need to strengthen the knowledge regarding HPV vaccination among teachers as they also are a key source of information for the majority of the children. Additional interventions are needed to support parents in making informed decisions for HPV vaccinations. 

Keywords
Attitude, child, human papillomavirus viruses, knowledge, parents
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105653 (URN)
Conference
35th International Papillomavirus Conference & Basic, Clinical and Public Health Scientific Workshops (IPVC 2023), Washington DC, USA, April 17-21, 2023
Available from: 2023-04-24 Created: 2023-04-24 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Carlsen Misic, M., Olsson, E., Eriksson, M., Ericson, J. & Ullsten, A. (2023). “Having my boy on my chest, humming to him, made us both very calm.”: Parents to new-born infants rated parent-delivered pain management as significantly meaningful during venepuncture. In: : . Paper presented at International Symposium on Pediatric Pain, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, October 1-4, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Having my boy on my chest, humming to him, made us both very calm.”: Parents to new-born infants rated parent-delivered pain management as significantly meaningful during venepuncture
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background:

Parents are a valuable but underutilized resource in procedural pain management in newborn infants. Parents want to take an active role in their infants’ pain management.  Yet, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the parents’ experiences of providing pain management.  Newborn infants experience several painful procedures related to postnatal care and immunizations. Not all infants receive adequate pain management during these procedures causing unnecessary suffering and leaves the infant at risk of complications. Parent-delivered pain management such as skin to skin contact and breastfeeding alleviate the infant’s pain during painful procedures. Live parental infant-directed lullaby singing has not been previously investigated during painful procedures. Infant-directed singing can be an apt medium for parents and infants to communicate in affective mutual relationship during painful procedures. Parents have a unique expertise about their infants and by including them in the pain management they could become valuable partners for the health professionals. The aim of the study was to investigate how meaningful the parents experienced providing procedural pain management to their newborn infant. 

Method: 

This study was part of a multi-center randomized controlled trial (RCT) with three parallel groups of healthy newborn infants and their parents. The SWEpap study (Parents as pain management in Swedish neonatal care), investigates the efficacy of combined pain management with skin-to-skin contact, breastfeeding and live parental lullaby singing compared with standard pain care initiated by health care professionals, and compared with just holding skin-to-skin during routine metabolic screening of newborn infants. The infant-parent dyads were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. For the parents’ ratings of meaningfulness, a visual analogue scale (VAS) with a 100mm line anchored at the ends is used; from “not meaningful” on the left end point, up to “most possible meaningful” on the right end point of the scale. The parents were also asked to give their verbal comment on how they experienced the blood sampling situation and providing pain management.  

Results: 

A total number of 151 newborn infants with at least one parent, participated in the study. Mean gestational age was 39.6 w., mean birth weight was 3547 g., and 49,7 % were girls.  The mean VAS-ratings for meaningfulness were 82.1 in the standard care group, 89.5 in the skin-to-skin group and 88.9 in the combined intervention group. The ratings in the two groups with parent-delivered pain-alleviation were significantly higher than in the standard care group (p=0.036).  Parents in all groups expressed that it was meaningful to provide pain-relief and participate in the pain management of their newborn infant.  “Very meaningful. It felt much safer to have her close to me during the skin puncture. Usually, she is on the examination table which gives an unsecure feeling because when she is in pain you can’t do anything as a parent.” (Mother, skin-to-skin group) “It felt very good to make a positive impact. Singing went very well. I usually sing all the time at home.” (Father, combined group) “I could control the syringe with glucose which made me less helpless as a parent because I could contribute.” (Parent, standard care group) Some parents commented that providing pain management helped themselves to overcome their own fears. “I am scared of needles myself and has been worrying about needles and blood but this went really well. She was so calm, gave not a sound. I could also relax when she was calm.” (Mother, skin-to-skin group) Parents also compared with previous blood sampling situations. “My previous child was totally hysteric during blood sampling on the examination table. Today, the baby was absolutely calm.” (Parent, combined group)  Finally, many parents expressed that they wanted to continue providing parent-delivered pain management in the future. “I can absolutely think to use this pain relief combination in the future. He does recognize the singing and my voice from before.” (Mother, combined group)  

Conclusions: 

The findings of this study shows that parents find it meaningful to provide parent-delivered pain-alleviating interventions during painful procedures in postnatal care. The parents in the skin-to-skin group and the group that combined skin-to-skin, breastfeeding, and live parental lullaby singing expressed that they wanted to keep using these methods in future painful situations as well. Even parents with fear of needles felt it was meaningful to participate in parent-delivered pain-alleviating pain management since their participation blunted their own fear.  Relevance for patient care: All newborn infants are subjected to painful procedures during the first months of life and pain-relieving methods are insufficiently used. Modern neonatal care strives to be family oriented with a high degree of parental participation. This must also be the case with pain management and parents must be given tools and opportunities to be an active agent in their infant’s pain management. 

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108750 (URN)
Conference
International Symposium on Pediatric Pain, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, October 1-4, 2023
Available from: 2023-10-04 Created: 2023-10-04 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Eriksson, M. & Ohlin, A. (2023). Home phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates: an unblinded multicentre randomised controlled trial. In: : . Paper presented at jENS 2023. 5th Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies. Rome, Italy, 19-23 September 2023. , Article ID ID 38.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates: an unblinded multicentre randomised controlled trial
2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

There are a few previous studies on home phototherapy but there is a lack of randomised controlled trials. The aim of this study was therefore to assess whether home phototherapy is a safe and effective alternative to hospital treatment and whether it has an impact on bonding and stress. 

Methods

This was a randomised controlled, multicentre, trial in which newborns with a total serum bilirubin of 18-24 mg/dl (300-400 µmol/) were randomized to either home phototherapy or conventional in-hospital phototherapy. The inclusion criteria were a chronological age of more than 48 hours, a gestational age above 36 +0 weeks and a bilirubin above 20.5 mg/dl (350 µmol/L) after 72 hours of age. After inclusion, the patients were randomised, to either home phototherapy or hospital treatment.

Results

147 patients were recruited from 6 hospitals, 69 patients were randomized to conventional phototherapy and 78 to home phototherapy

Safety/feasability

The duration of phototherapy, length of stay, amount of blood tests and weight change showed no statistically significant differences between hospital and home phototherapy (table 2). However, home treatment failed in three patients and the total readmission rate was 4 %. It is recommended to provide daily check-ups and 24/7 telephone support to the parents.

Bonding and stress

Parents in the intervention group had better bonding both at discharge (p = 0.034) and at 4 months (p = 0.008; effect size r = 0.2) and lower levels of stress at 4 months (p = 0.024) compared with controls.

Cost

The cost was €337 per patient for home phototherapy compared with €1156 for the hospital alternative indicating average cost savings of €819 (95% confidence interval €613–1025) or 71% per  patient.

Descriptive qualitative study

A total of 15 interviews were performed (8 mothers, 7 fathers).The interviews showed that parents felt secure at home. The overall experience of home phototherapy was positive, and five categories were identified describing their experiences: continuing life at home, adjusting to having a newborn, feeling secure, experiencing parenthood, and accessing information.

Keywords
Newborn, home phototherapy
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108512 (URN)
Conference
jENS 2023. 5th Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies. Rome, Italy, 19-23 September 2023
Available from: 2023-09-25 Created: 2023-09-25 Last updated: 2023-10-02Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Eriksson, M., Albinsson, E., Odlind, A., Blomberg, K., Ryen, L. & Ohlin, A. (2023). Home phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates: an unblinded multicentre randomised controlled trial. In: Örebro University's Nobel Day Festivities: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at Nobel Day Festivites.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates: an unblinded multicentre randomised controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Örebro University's Nobel Day Festivities: Book of Abstracts, 2023Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background/Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether home phototherapy is a safe alternative to hospital treatment.

Method: This was a randomised controlled, multicentre, trial in which term newborns with a total serum bilirubin of 300-400 μmol/ were randomized to either home phototherapy or conventional in-hospital phototherapy.The outcome measurements were parent-infant bonding, stress and measurements of safety and feasibility. A descriptive qualitative study based on interviews was performed as well as a health economic analysis.

Result: 147 patients were recruited from 6 hospitals, Results showed no difference between groups in the safety and feasibility outcomes. Parents in the intervention group had better scores on bonding and lower levels of stress. The interviews showed that parents felt secure at home. The cost per patient was €337 for home phototherapy compared with €1156 for the hospital alternative indicating average cost savings of €819 or 71% per patient.

Conclusion: Home phototherapy can be considered a safe and feasible alternative to hospital care for well selected patients. It improves bonding and stress for parents and reduces health care costs. Since the first publication from this study was published home phototherapy is now recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics as an alternative to hospital care for patients with uncomplicated hyperbilirubinemia.

Keywords
Newborn infant, phototherapy
National Category
Pediatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110073 (URN)978-91-87789-92-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Nobel Day Festivites
Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2023-12-13Bibliographically approved
Poikonen, H., Duberg, A., Eriksson, M., Eriksson Crommert, M., Lund, M., Möller, M. & Msghina, M. (2023). InMotion – Mixed physical exercise with creative movement as an intervention for people with schizophrenia. In: : . Paper presented at 5th Body Representation Network Conference 2023, 14-15 September 2023, Majorca, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>InMotion – Mixed physical exercise with creative movement as an intervention for people with schizophrenia
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Schizophrenia (SCZ) is among the world’s top ten causes of long-term disability (World Health Organization, 2004). The major symptoms of SCZ include hallucinations, delusions, affective flattening, and cognitive impairment, and their treatment with antipsychotic medications is far from optimal.Creative and body awareness training (dance/movement therapy, body psychotherapy) and physical training (aerobic and strength training) improve SCZ symptoms (e.g Martin et al., 2016, 2017; Girdler et al., 2019; Millman et a., 2021). In our novel intervention, we bring together creativity and self-awareness with physical training. The 12-week 24-session intervention with 30 participants (Figure 1) includes components like visualization, cardio and strength training, and social interaction. We will measure the impact with standardized clinical questionnaires, EEG-fNIRS, motion capture, and cognitive, affective, and physical tests. We expect our intervention to improve the quality of life and negative symptoms of SCZ by balancing the brain functions and bodily state related to self-awareness, social interaction, and physical fitness. In my talk, I will cover brain dysfunctions related to self-awareness in SCZ (Ferri et al., 2012; Ebisch et al., 2013) and describe the scientific rationale for each component included in our novel intervention (e.g. Lee et al., 2015; Firth et al., 2017).

Keywords
Schizophrenia, body awareness, creative movement, physical activity, brain imaging, motion capture, rehabilitation medicine
National Category
Other Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108517 (URN)
Conference
5th Body Representation Network Conference 2023, 14-15 September 2023, Majorca, Spain
Available from: 2023-09-25 Created: 2023-09-25 Last updated: 2023-10-20Bibliographically approved
Poikonen, H., Duberg, A., Eriksson, M., Eriksson Crommert, M., Lund, M., Möller, M. & Msghina, M. (2023). “InMotion”—Mixed physical exercise program with creative movement as an intervention for adults with schizophrenia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 17, Article ID 1192729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“InMotion”—Mixed physical exercise program with creative movement as an intervention for adults with schizophrenia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 17, article id 1192729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Schizophrenia is among the world’s top 10 causes of long-term disability with symptoms that lead to major problems in social and occupational functioning, and in self-care. Therefore, it is important to investigate the efficacy of complementary treatment options for conventionally used antipsychotic medication, such as physical training, and psychosocial interventions.

Objective: To combine aerobic and strength training with cognitive, emotional and social stimulation in one intervention for people with schizophrenia and test the feasibility and effects of this intervention.

Methods: The study is a mixed-method randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of a 12-week intervention for adults with schizophrenia. The treatment group (30 participants) will receive the intervention in addition to standard care and the control group (30 participants) only standard care. The intervention consists of 24 biweekly sessions with a duration of 60 min. The pre-test (weeks from 4 to 2 prior to the intervention) and post-test (week 12) include clinical measure (PANSS), quality of life, social performance, movement quantity, brain function and eye tracking measures. In addition, a treatment subgroup of 12–15 participants and their family member or other next of kin will complete a qualitative interview as a part of their post-test. Two follow-up tests, including clinical, quality of life, brain function and eye tracking will be made at 6 and 12 months from the completion of the intervention to both study groups. The primary outcome is change in negative symptoms. Secondary outcome measures include general and positive symptoms, quality of life, social performance, movement quantity, brain function and eye tracking. Explorative outcome includes patient and family member or other next of kin interview.

Results: Pilot data was collected by June 2023 and the main data collection will begin in September 2023. The final follow-up is anticipated to be completed by 2026.

Conclusion: The InMotion study will provide new knowledge on the feasibility, efficacy, and experiences of a novel intervention for adults with schizophrenia. The hypothesis is that regular participation in the intervention will reduce clinical symptoms, normalize physiological measures such as brain activation, and contribute to new active habits for the participants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
schizophrenia, physical activity, brain imaging, Motion Capture, physical therapy, rehabilitation medicine, dance
National Category
Physiotherapy Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-106999 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2023.1192729 (DOI)001031841600001 ()37476005 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165214464 (Scopus ID)
Projects
InMotion
Funder
Märta Lundqvists FoundationRegion Örebro County
Note

Funding agency:

ETH Zurich

Available from: 2023-07-06 Created: 2023-07-06 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M. (2023). Lilla Barnsmärtguiden (translates to “The small guide about pain in small children): A responsive e-health application for health professionals and parents. In: : . Paper presented at International Symposium on Pediatric Pain 2023 (ISPP 2023), Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, October 1-4, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lilla Barnsmärtguiden (translates to “The small guide about pain in small children): A responsive e-health application for health professionals and parents
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Pain, Vaccination, Immunization, Children
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108753 (URN)
Conference
International Symposium on Pediatric Pain 2023 (ISPP 2023), Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, October 1-4, 2023
Available from: 2023-10-04 Created: 2023-10-04 Last updated: 2023-10-27Bibliographically approved
Persson, C., Ericson, J., Salari, R., Eriksson, M. & Flacking, R. (2023). NICU parents' mental health: A comparative study with parents of term and healthy infants. Acta Paediatrica, 112(5), 954-966
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NICU parents' mental health: A comparative study with parents of term and healthy infants
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2023 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 5, p. 954-966Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To compare mental health in parents of preterm/ill infants and parents of term and healthy infants before birth and 1 month after hospital discharge.

METHODS: A comparative cohort design was used. In total 439 parents from six neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and 484 parents from four maternity units (MUs) in Sweden answered a survey 1 month after discharge.

RESULTS: Parents in neonatal units experienced significantly more psychologically traumatic births and rated their health and the health of their infants less favourably the first week after delivery than parents in MUs. In the neonatal units, both parents had better possibilities to stay together with the infant during hospital stay. There was no difference between the NICU and MU groups in postpartum depressive symptoms 1 month after discharge. Experiencing a traumatic birth was not related to an increased risk of perinatal depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale ≥13) for mothers in NICUs. In contrast, the risk of depression increased for mothers in MUs.

CONCLUSION: Family togetherness, parent-infant closeness and emotional support at NICUs may contribute to the positive outcome. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term effects of how family togetherness and closeness influence families long-term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2023
Keywords
NICU, mental health, neonatal care, parents, preterm infants
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-104580 (URN)10.1111/apa.16735 (DOI)000952489900001 ()36853186 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150763413 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Föräldraskap efter neonatalvården - PANC
Note

Funding agencies:

Center for Clinical Research Dalarna (CKF)

Healthcare Regional Research Council

Lilla Barnets Fond

Swedish Association of Paediatric Nurses

Swedish Nurse Association

Available from: 2023-03-06 Created: 2023-03-06 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Persson, C., Ericson, J., Salari, R., Eriksson, M. & Flacking, R. (2023). NICU parents’ mental health: A comparative study with parents of term and healthy infants, 1 month after discharge. In: : . Paper presented at 11th MAINN conference - Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit, Lancashire, United Kingdom, April 19-21, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NICU parents’ mental health: A comparative study with parents of term and healthy infants, 1 month after discharge
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Parents who have been at neonatal units (NICUs) with their infants have increased risks for exhibit symptoms of depression or psychological trauma. Key risk factors for the onset of depression, symptoms of psychological trauma, or parental anxiety during the time in NICU are; a stressful birth experience, early and prolonged separation and unclear responsibilities for the infant (de Paula Eduardo et al., 2019; R. Flacking et al., 2012). Maternal depression levels in NICU mothers could decrease if parents' have [ME1] unlimited access to their infants, a trustworthy staff-parent partnership, substantial emotional support (Axelin et al., 2021), and a single-family room (Tandberg et al., 2019). In Sweden most parents can stay at the unit day and night and therefore staff has good opportunities to give support (Flacking et al., 2019).

Aim: To compare mental health in parents of preterm/ill infants and parents of term and healthy infants before birth and 1 month after hospital discharge.

Method: A comparative cohort design where parents from six NICUs (n=439) and four maternal units (MUs) (n=484) in Sweden answered a survey one month after discharge.

Results:Parents from NICUs experienced significantly more traumatic births and rated their health worse the first week after giving birth, compared to MU parents. NICU parents also rated their infant’s health worse the first week after birth and they had longer hospital stay. One month after discharge there was no difference between NICU and MU parents regarding symptoms of postnatal depression (EPDS). However, an association between traumatic birth and depression was only observed in mothers from MUs. Both parents at all NICUs had access to their infant 24/7 and they were significantly more often staying together as a family at the NICU. In total 80% of NICU parents were satisfied with the emotional support given by staff and significantly more NICU fathers were satisfied compared to MU fathers.

Conclusion: ‘Family togetherness’, parent-infant closeness, and emotional support at the NICU could be protective factors for developing depression in NICU parents in the short term because it strengthens parenthood, attachment, and resilience.  [ME1]had?

Keywords
Discharge, EPDS, health, NICU, parents
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105657 (URN)
Conference
11th MAINN conference - Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit, Lancashire, United Kingdom, April 19-21, 2023
Projects
PANC
Available from: 2023-04-24 Created: 2023-04-24 Last updated: 2023-05-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5996-2584

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