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Eriksson, Mats, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5996-2584
Publications (10 of 143) Show all publications
Eriksson, M. & Campbell-Yeo, M. (2019). Assessment of pain in newborn infants. Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of pain in newborn infants
2019 (English)In: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, ISSN 1744-165X, E-ISSN 1878-0946Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Hospitalized newborn infants experience pain that can have negative short- and long-term consequences and thus should be prevented and treated. National and international guidelines state that adequate pain management requires valid pain assessment. Nociceptive signals cause a cascade of physical and behavioral reactions that alone or in combination can be observed and used to assess the presence and intensity of pain.

Units that are caring for newborn infants must adopt sufficient pain assessment tools to cover the gestational ages and pain types that occurs in their setting. Pain assessment should be performed on a regular basis and any detection of pain should be acted on. Future research should focus on developing and validating pain assessment tools for specific situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Saunders Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Infant, Newborn, Pain, Pain Measurement
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Research subject
Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73582 (URN)10.1016/j.siny.2019.04.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Stenninger, E., Blomberg, K., Eriksson, M. & Brorson, L.-O. (2019). Epilepsi: 50 års uppföljning. In: : . Paper presented at Barnveckan 2019, Örebro, Sweden, 1-4 April, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epilepsi: 50 års uppföljning
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Epilepsi, Uppföljning
National Category
Nursing Neurology
Research subject
Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73486 (URN)
Conference
Barnveckan 2019, Örebro, Sweden, 1-4 April, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Flacking, R., Breili, C. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Facilities for presence and provision of support to parents and significant others in neonatal units. Acta Paediatrica
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilities for presence and provision of support to parents and significant others in neonatal units
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe parental facilities for staying in neonatal units, visiting policies, and access to emotional support during hospitalization.

Methods: A cross‐sectional design was used in which a survey was presented to all neonatal units in Sweden; 34 out of 38 units participated (89%).

Results: The findings showed that in 50% of the units, parents could stay 24/7 for the infant's entire hospital stay. In 32% of the units, siblings could stay the night with their parents. Units had policies on restrictions for visits by siblings (80%), grandparents (59%), friends and relatives (71%). All units offered counselling to parents, and some units offered peer‐to‐peer groups (24%), diaries (35%), relaxation techniques (6%) or internet parental forums (6%). All units enabled parents to be at home with their infant and to visit the unit for check‐ups (35%) or to have staff visits at home (65%).

Conclusion: Facilities for parents to stay with their infant during hospitalization and to have significant others visit are good, but there is room for improvement. During the transitional phase to being at home, parents are facilitated in being at home before the infant is discharged and are supported by the unit, which must be considered beneficial for parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Infant, Newborn, Family
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Pediatrics; Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75424 (URN)10.1111/apa.14948 (DOI)31350769 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Brorson, L.-O., Eriksson, M., Blomberg, K. & Stenninger, E. (2019). Fifty years' follow-up of childhood epilepsy: Medical outcome, morbidity, and medication. Epilepsia, 60(3), 381-392
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fifty years' follow-up of childhood epilepsy: Medical outcome, morbidity, and medication
2019 (English)In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 381-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe the long‐term prognosis of childhood epilepsy, with special emphasis on seizure remission, relapse, medication, associated neurologic impairment, mortality rate, and cause of death.

Methods: A prospective longitudinal study on a population‐based total cohort of 195 children with epileptic seizures in 1962‐1964. Data were collected from medical records and a questionnaire.

Results: Follow‐up data from 94% of the initial cohort showed the best long‐term prognosis for seizure freedom for children with no intellectual or neurologic impairment. These children had later seizure onset, shorter total duration of epilepsy, and were more often medication free. Only a few of them had isolated relapses. Generalized, rather than focal, epilepsy was associated with fewer relapses and less ongoing medication. The “true incidence” group, with onsets during the inclusion period of 1962‐1964, had the best long‐term prognosis for seizure freedom, with 90% seizure‐free after 50 years. Although only 10% of this group had ongoing seizures at follow‐up, 22% still used anticonvulsive medication, often with old drugs, that is, phenobarbital or phenytoin, as one of the anticonvulsive drugs. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 2.61 for the whole group, with no difference between those with or without other neurodeficits. Those who died young either had neurologic impairment or died from epilepsy‐related conditions; later deaths often followed non–epilepsy‐related conditions. No one in the incidence group died of SUDEP (sudden unexpected death in epilepsy).

Significance: This 50‐year, long‐term follow‐up of a cohort of persons with childhood epilepsy in general demonstrates a better outcome for seizure freedom compared to our follow‐up after 12 years and to previous reports. We also report a low incidence of seizure relapses. Remission of seizures does not automatically lead to termination of medication. The mortality rate associated with SUDEP was lower than previously reported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
cause of death, long-term follow-up, medication, mortality, relapse, seizures
National Category
Nursing Neurology
Research subject
Medicine; Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71610 (URN)10.1111/epi.14643 (DOI)000460315700004 ()30663037 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060353799 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

OÖrebro University Faculty of Medicine and Health  

Research Committee at Region Örebro County  

Föreningen Margaretahemmet, Sweden 

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Brorson, L.-O., Stenninger, E. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Fifty-year follow-up of childhood epilepsy: Social, psychometric, and occupational outcome. Epilepsy & Behavior, 96, 224-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fifty-year follow-up of childhood epilepsy: Social, psychometric, and occupational outcome
2019 (English)In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 96, p. 224-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experience of a childhood diagnosis of epilepsy and its consequences for the experiences of daily life over a span of 50 years.

METHODS: A descriptive mixed method design was chosen. Data were collected through a survey returned by 86 persons (59% response rate) who had received diagnoses of epilepsy as children. The survey contained questions about education, vocation, family status, and included the 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Additionally, interviews (n = 11) were conducted and analyzed by interpretative description.

RESULTS: Few persons reported that the childhood diagnosis of epilepsy had affected their choice of education, work, or leisure activities. However, 20% reported that the diagnosis had caused problems in school or at work and had restricted their activities of daily living. Sixty-six percent of the participants were married, and 68% had children; of those, 12 (20%) reported that one or more of the children had also had seizures. Almost all reported no anxiety (82%) and no depression (90%). The results of the interviews revealed a balancing act between 'Controlling and managing the situation' and 'Not being restricted by the condition'.

SIGNIFICANCE: This long-term follow-up over a 50-year life-span of persons who received childhood diagnoses of epilepsy suggests that the consequences for education, work, and leisure activities were few. Most of the participants had developed strategies to manage their situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Life-situation, Long-term follow-up, Seizures, Epilepsy, Child, Life-span
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74623 (URN)10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.01.034 (DOI)000472472900033 ()31176891 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066789610 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University  

Föreningen Margaretahemmet, Sweden 

Available from: 2019-06-07 Created: 2019-06-07 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Ullsten, A., Volgsten, U., Klässbo, M. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Live lullaby singing during painful procedures in preterm and term infants. In: : . Paper presented at 12th International Symposium on Pediatric Pain (ISPP 2019), Basel, Switzerland, June 16-20, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Live lullaby singing during painful procedures in preterm and term infants
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Infant-directed singing is a medium for parents and infants to communicate in a mutual relationship. Infant-directed singing is a multisensory biopsychosocial communication that also applies to ill and vulnerable hospitalised infants. The first Nordic implementation process of family-centred neonatal music therapy started in Sweden at the Central Hospital in Karlstad by the first author in March 2010 (Fig. 1). Live lullaby singing during painful procedures is the first clinical trial to measure the pain-relieving effects of live lullaby singing during venepuncture in preterm and term neonates.

Method: 38 infants were subjected to venepuncture with and without live lullaby singing, in a randomised order with a cross over design. Parent-preferred lullabies were performed live by a music therapy student and standard care (facilitated tucking and oral glucose) was provided for all infants. Behavioural and physiological pain responses were assessed. The data from the RCT was analysed with qualitative and quantitative methods.

Results: During the lullaby procedures the physiological patterns were more stable and regular. Lullaby singing significantly calmed the infants’ respiration before venepuncture (Fig. 2). There were nonsignificant indications of fewer and shorter skin punctures with lullaby singing. The behavioural pain responses did not show any significant differences between the live lullaby singing and standard care procedures, however, nor did they indicate that live lullaby singing was harmful or stressful.

Conclusion: Live singing with infants is a biopsychosocial communicative interaction. A music therapist specialised in family-centred neonatal music therapy methods can mentor parents how to use live lullaby singing in connection to painful procedures. More research is needed to explore the potential benefits of family-centred music therapy as procedural support including the voice of the parents.

Keywords
Pain management, premature infants, music therapy, infant directed singing, lullaby
National Category
Musicology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74654 (URN)
Conference
12th International Symposium on Pediatric Pain (ISPP 2019), Basel, Switzerland, June 16-20, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Olsson, E., Ohlin, A. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Neurophysiological and behavioural measures of pain during neonatal hip examination. In: : . Paper presented at 12th International Symposium on Pediatric Pain (ISPP), Basel Switzerland, June 16-20, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurophysiological and behavioural measures of pain during neonatal hip examination
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Purpose: In Sweden, all newborns are examined before discharge from the maternity ward to rule out innate abnormalities. Parts of this procedure, such as the hip examination, appear to cause pain and discomfort. Pain in newborns can have both short- and long-term negative consequences and preventing and treating this pain is therefore an important part of medical care. There are several ways to recognize and assess pain in newborn infants. Scales such as the Premature Infant Pain Profile-Revised (PIPP-R) are recommended, but recently physiological and neurophysiological measures, e.g. Near-in-frared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) have been suggested as superior pain measuring methods. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that neonatal hip examination causes pain in newborns.

Methods: The infant was placed on an examination table and a video camera was placed so the face of the newborn was filmed. A pulse oximeter probe, NIRS optodes and GSR electrodes were attached to the infant. Heart auscultation was chosen to be used as a non-painful comparative to hip examination.

Results: The results showed higher pain scoring for the hip examination than for the heart auscultation. NIRS, showed a significant difference in HbO2 on both sides of cortex (p=0,011 and p=0,017). Mean PIPP-R went from 3.0 during the heart auscultation to 8.1 during the hip examination (p=0.000). GSR analyses showed significant increase in area under small peaks during the hip examination (p=0.016), however not when measured in peaks per second (p=0.104). The interrater reliability for NIRS interpretations had an ICC-range of 0,93-1,0 (p<0,001). 

Conclusion: We conclude that neonatal hip examinations are painful and that the pain should be treated, e.g. with oral sweet solution.

Keywords
Pain, newborn infant, hip examination
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74655 (URN)
Conference
12th International Symposium on Pediatric Pain (ISPP), Basel Switzerland, June 16-20, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M. (2019). Nurses as chief investigators for clinical studies. In: : . Paper presented at 30th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Congress (ESPNIC), Salzburg, Austria, Jine 18-21, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses as chief investigators for clinical studies
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Nurse, clinical study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75556 (URN)
Conference
30th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Congress (ESPNIC), Salzburg, Austria, Jine 18-21, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Olsson, E., Pettersson, M., Eriksson, M. & Ohlin, A. (2019). Oral sweet solution to prevent pain during neonatal hip examination: a randomized controlled trial. Acta Paediatrica, 108(4), 626-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral sweet solution to prevent pain during neonatal hip examination: a randomized controlled trial
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 626-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To determine if oral glucose can have a pain relieving effect during routine hip exams in newborn infants.

Methods: In this randomized controlled study 100 newborn infants undergoing the routine physical examination including the potentially painful hip exam were included between March 2016 and April 2017. 50 infants were randomized to water (control) and 50 to oral glucose (intervention) before their examination. Pain was assessed using crying time, Astrid Lindgren and Lund Children's Hospital Pain and Stress Assessment Scale (ALPS‐Neo) and Visual analogue scale (VAS).

Results:  Total crying time (p=0.06), crying time during the hip examination (p=0.028), ALPS‐Neo (p=0.004) and VAS (p=0.006) (when assessed by the physician) were all significantly decreased in the group of infants receiving glucose. VAS assessment made by the parents did not reach statistical significance (p=0.127).

Conclusion:  Oral glucose given before the examination has a pain relieving effect during the hip exam in healthy newborn infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Hip examination, newborn, oral glucose, pain
National Category
Pediatrics Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69112 (URN)10.1111/apa.14588 (DOI)000461014600008 ()30246505 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054926490 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Region Örebro County 

Available from: 2018-09-29 Created: 2018-09-29 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Axelin, A., Dovland Andersen, R., Eriksson, M., Kristjánsdóttir, G. & Weis, J. (2019). Pain in early life (pearl) – a network for pain research and education. In: : . Paper presented at 3rd jENS Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies, Maastricht, the Netherlands, September 17-21, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain in early life (pearl) – a network for pain research and education
Show others...
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

Small children are especially vulnerable to the deleterious effects of pain. High quality research is needed to protect young children from the negative effects of pain. Previously pediatric pain research in the Nordic region was severely limited; hampered by small samples and small-scale, time-consuming studies carried out by a few dedicated researchers. The similarities across the Nordic countries, concerning population composition, healthcare systems, and culture, made it reasonable to join forces for advances in child pain research and evidence-based practice.

 

Methods 

In 2014, a group of Nordic researchers from the field of pain in early life gathered for a workshop in Örebro, Sweden. The participants knew each other from conferences or participation in common projects. Several were also collaborators, trainees, or alumni in the Canadian Pain in Child Health (PICH) network. The group decided to form a new network with the vision: To be a stable and competent research and training network within the area of pain in early life. The network was named PEARL – Pain in EARly Life. Three areas of work were defined: to provide parents with evidence-based information on pain relieving strategies, to provide healthcare professionals with evidence-based tools for the management of pain, and to perform collaborative research.

 

Results 

Since then, PEARL has held yearly lecture days about pain in early life in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Denmark and thereby reached hundreds of clinicians. The meeting in Denmark was organized together with PICH as a PICH2Go-event with participants from 13 countries around the world. Four trainees have been awarded their PhD-degree, three members have become associate professors and two have become full professors. In all, 24 persons from the Nordic countries, Poland and Canada are members of PEARL. In the past 5 years, researchers from PEARL have published 94 papers about pain and stress (Fig 1). In a collaborative project, the pain assessment scale PIPP-R has been translated and culturally adapted for four Nordic languages. PEARL has established a website in six languages, with sections for parents, professionals and researchers: www.pearl.direct.

Conclusion 

In five years, PEARL has had significant impact in pediatric pain research and attracted new collaborators and students. Moving forward, PEARL will focus on increasing its collaboration with other research groups. We will also make an effort to strengthen and develop parent partnerships and collaboration to ensure the best research and care possible for vulnerable small children. 

Keywords
Pain, Newborn infant, Children
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76417 (URN)
Conference
3rd jENS Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies, Maastricht, the Netherlands, September 17-21, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-14 Created: 2019-09-14 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5996-2584

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