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Duberg, Ann-Sofi, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7248-0910
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Publications (10 of 75) Show all publications
(2024). Adjusted estimate of the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus in 25 countries and territories. Journal of Hepatology, 80(2), 232-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adjusted estimate of the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus in 25 countries and territories
2024 (English)In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 232-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a satellite RNA virus that requires the hepatitis B virus (HBV) for assembly and propagation. Individuals infected with HDV progress to advanced liver disease faster than HBV mono-infected individuals. Recent studies have estimated the global prevalence of anti-HDV antibodies among the HBV-infected population to be 5-15%. This study aimed to better understand HDV prevalence at the population level in 25 countries/territories.

METHODS: We conducted a literature review for anti-HDV and HDV-RNA-positive prevalence in HBsAg positive individuals in 25 countries/territories. Virtual meetings were held with experts from each setting to discuss the findings and collect unpublished data. Data were weighted for patient segments and regional heterogeneity to estimate the prevalence in the HBV-infected population. The findings were then combined with The Polaris Observatory HBV data to estimate the anti-HDV & HDV-RNA prevalence in each country/territory at the population level.

RESULTS: After adjusting for geographical distribution, disease stage and special populations, the anti-HDV prevalence among the HBsAg+ population changed from the literature estimate in 19 countries. The highest anti-HDV prevalence was 60.1% in Mongolia. Once adjusted for the HBsAg+ population and HDV-RNA+, China had the highest absolute number of HDV-RNA+ cases. CONCLUSIONS: We found substantially lower HDV prevalence than previously reported, as prior meta-analyses primarily focused on studies conducted in groups/regions that have a higher probability of HBV infection: tertiary care centers, specific risk groups or geographical regions. There is large uncertainty in HDV prevalence. The implementation of reflex testing would improve estimates, while also allowing earlier linkage to care for HDV-RNA-positive individuals. The logistical and economic burden of reflex testing on the health system would be limited, as it would only screen HBsAg+ cases.

IMPACT AND IMPLICATIONS: There is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the prevalence of HDV among people living with HBV at the population level. This study aimed to better understand the burden in 25 countries and territories, to refine techniques that can be used in future analyses. We found a lower prevalence in the majority of places studied than had been previously reported. These data can help inform policy makers on the need to screen people living with HBV to find those coinfected with HDV and at high risk for progression, while also highlighting the pitfalls that other researchers have often fallen into.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Epidemiology, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis D, Hepatitis delta virus, Prevalence, Viral hepatitis
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109964 (URN)10.1016/j.jhep.2023.10.043 (DOI)38030035 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181735099 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Gilead Sciences 

John C Martin Foundation

Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Kamal, H., Lindahl, K., Ingre, M., Gahrton, C., Karkkonen, K., Nowak, P., . . . Aleman, S. (2024). The cascade of care for patients with chronic hepatitis delta in Southern Stockholm, Sweden for the past 30 years. Liver international, 44(1), 228-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cascade of care for patients with chronic hepatitis delta in Southern Stockholm, Sweden for the past 30 years
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2024 (English)In: Liver international, ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have shown suboptimal screening for hepatitis D virus (HDV) among patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). This study presents the cascade of care for HDV infection in a major secondary referral centre in Southern Stockholm, Sweden.

METHODS: HBsAg+ve patients attending Karolinska University Hospital (KUH) from 1992 to 2022 were identified. The prevalence of anti-HDV and/or HDV RNA positivity, interferon (IFN) therapy and maintained virological responses (MVR) after HDV treatment were assessed. Also, time to anti-HDV testing was analysed in relation to liver-related outcomes with logistic regression.

RESULTS: Among 4095 HBsAg+ve persons, 3703 (90.4%) underwent an anti-HDV screening; within a median of 1.8 months (range 0.0-57.1) after CHB diagnosis. This screening rate increased over time, to 97.9% in the last decade. Overall, 310 (8.4%) were anti-HDV+ve, of which 202 (65.2%) were HDV RNA+ve. Eighty-five (42%) received IFN, and 9 (10.6%) achieved MVR at the last follow-up. The predictive factors for anti-HDV screening were Asian origin, diagnosis after the year 2012, HIV co-infection (negative factor) and HBV DNA level < 2000 IU/mL in univariable analysis, while HIV co-infection was the only remaining factor in multivariable analysis. Delayed anti-HDV test >5 years was independently associated with worsened liver-related outcomes (adjusted odds ratio = 7.6, 95% CI 1.8-31.6).

CONCLUSION: Higher frequency of HDV screening than previously published data could be seen among CHB patients at KUH in a low-endemic setting. Receiving a delayed screening test seems to be associated with worse outcomes, stressing the need of a strategy for timely HDV diagnosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2024
Keywords
HBV, HDV, HIV, cascade of care, hepatitis delta, screening
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109511 (URN)10.1111/liv.15770 (DOI)001094595000001 ()37904316 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175429815 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Kamal, H., Ingre, M., Stål, P., Westman, G., Bruce, D., Wedemeyer, H., . . . Aleman, S. (2023). Age-specific and sex-specific risks for HCC in African-born persons with chronic hepatitis B without cirrhosis. Hepatology communications, 7(12), Article ID e0334.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-specific and sex-specific risks for HCC in African-born persons with chronic hepatitis B without cirrhosis
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2023 (English)In: Hepatology communications, E-ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e0334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The international recommendations of HCC surveillance for African-born persons with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) without cirrhosis are divergent, probably due to scarce data on incidence rate (IR) for HCC.

METHODS: We assembled a cohort with prospectively collected data of Swedish residents of African origin with diagnosed CHB without cirrhosis at baseline from 1990 to 2015. Data from nationwide registers were used to calculate the sex-specific IR and IR ratio (incidence rate ratios) in relation to age, comorbidities, and birth region, using a generalized linear model with a log-link function and Poisson distribution.

RESULTS: Among 3865 African-born persons with CHB without cirrhosis at baseline, 31 (0.8%; 77.4% men) developed HCC during a median of 11.1 years of follow-up, with poor survival after HCC diagnosis. The mean age at HCC diagnosis was 46.8 (SD±14.7; range 23-79) in men. HCC IR exceeded the recommended surveillance threshold of 0.2%/year at ages 54 and 59 years in men and women, respectively, and at ages 20-40 years if HCV or HDV co-infection was present. African-born men with CHB had an incidence rate ratios of 10.6 (95% CI 4.4-31.5) for HCC compared to matched African-born peers without CHB, and an incidence rate ratios of 35.3 (95% CI 16.0-88.7) compared to a matched general population.

CONCLUSIONS: African-born men with CHB without cirrhosis reached an IR of 0.2%/year between 50 and 60 years, and at younger ages if HCV or HDV co-infection was present. Our findings need further confirmation, and new cost-effectiveness analyses specific for young populations are needed, to provide personalized and cost-effective HCC surveillance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, 2023
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110909 (URN)10.1097/HC9.0000000000000334 (DOI)001112327800005 ()38051538 (PubMedID)
Note

Habiba Kamal received research grants from Gilead. Per Stal is on the speakers' bureau for Roche, Albireo, and Eisai. Heiner Wedemeyer consults for AstraZeneca, Eisai, and MSD. Ann-Sofi Duberg advises and is on the speakers' bureau for Gilead. Soo Aleman is on the speakers' bureau for Gilead. 

Available from: 2024-01-19 Created: 2024-01-19 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Razavi-Shearer, D., Duberg, A.-S. & Razavi, H. (2023). Global prevalence, cascade of care, and prophylaxis coverage of hepatitis B in 2022: a modelling study. The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 8(10), 879-907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global prevalence, cascade of care, and prophylaxis coverage of hepatitis B in 2022: a modelling study
2023 (English)In: The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 2468-1253, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 879-907Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The 2016 World Health Assembly endorsed the elimination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as a public health threat by 2030; existing therapies and prophylaxis measures make such elimination feasible, even in the absence of a virological cure. We aimed to estimate the national, regional, and global prevalence of HBV in the general population and among children aged 5 years and younger, as well as the rates of diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis, and the future burden globally.

METHODS: In this modelling study, we used a Delphi process with data from literature reviews and interviews with country experts to quantify the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention measures for HBV infection. The PRoGReSs Model, a dynamic Markov model, was used to estimate the country, regional, and global prevalence of HBV infection in 2022, and the effects of treatment and prevention on disease burden. The future incidence of morbidity and mortality in the absence of additional interventions was also estimated at the global level.

FINDINGS: We developed models for 170 countries which resulted in an estimated global prevalence of HBV infection in 2022 of 3·2% (95% uncertainty interval 2·7-4·0), corresponding to 257·5 million (216·6-316·4) individuals positive for HBsAg. Of these individuals, 36·0 million were diagnosed, and only 6·8 million of the estimated 83·3 million eligible for treatment were on treatment. The prevalence among children aged 5 years or younger was estimated to be 0·7% (0·6-1·0), corresponding to 5·6 million (4·5-7·8) children with HBV infection. Based on the most recent data, 85% of infants received three-dose HBV vaccination before 1 year of age, 46% had received a timely birth dose of vaccine, and 14% received hepatitis B immunoglobulin along with the full vaccination regimen. 3% of mothers with a high HBV viral load received antiviral treatment to reduce mother-to-child transmission.

INTERPRETATION: As 2030 approaches, the elimination targets remain out of reach for many countries under the current frameworks. Although prevention measures have had the most success, there is a need to increase these efforts and to increase diagnosis and treatment to work towards the elimination goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110910 (URN)10.1016/S2468-1253(23)00197-8 (DOI)37517414 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169786860 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

John C Martin Foundation

Gilead Sciences

EndHep2030

Available from: 2024-01-19 Created: 2024-01-19 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
(2023). Hepatitis D double reflex testing of all hepatitis B carriers in low-HBV- and high-HBV/HDV-prevalence countries. Journal of Hepatology, 79(2), 576-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hepatitis D double reflex testing of all hepatitis B carriers in low-HBV- and high-HBV/HDV-prevalence countries
2023 (English)In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 576-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection occurs as a coinfection with hepatitis B and increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, decompensated cirrhosis, and mortality compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) mono-infection. Reliable estimates of HDV infection prevalence and disease burden are essential to formulate strategies to find coinfected individuals more effectively and efficiently. The global prevalence of the HBV+ population is estimated at 262,240,000 in 2021. Only 1,994,000 of the HBV infections were newly diagnosed in 2021, with more than half of them in China. Initial estimates of HDV prevalence found a much lower prevalence of HDV antibody (anti-HDV) and HDV RNA-positive (RNA+) cases compared to published studies. There is need for accurate estimates of HDV prevalence. The most effective method to develop the estimates of anti-HDV+ and HDV RNA+ prevalence and find undiagnosed individuals at the national level is to implement double reflex testing. This requires anti-HDV testing of all hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals and HDV RNA testing of all anti-HDV+ individuals. This strategy is bearable for healthcare systems since the number of newly diagnosed HBV patients is small. At the global level, a comprehensive HDV screening strategy would require only 1,994,000 HDV antibody tests and less than 89,000 HDV PCR tests. Double reflex testing is the preferred strategy in low HBV prevalence or high HBV and high HDV prevalence settings. For example, in the European Union and North America only 35,000 and 22,000 will need anti-HDV testing annually.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
HDV, Hepatitis D virus
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105460 (URN)10.1016/j.jhep.2023.02.041 (DOI)001045482200001 ()37030400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159287431 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-09 Created: 2023-05-09 Last updated: 2023-09-21Bibliographically approved
Duberg, A.-S., Lybeck, C., Fält, A., Montgomery, S. & Aleman, S. (2022). Chronic hepatitis B virus infection and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma by age and country of origin in people living in Sweden: A national register study. Hepatology communications, 6(9), 2418-2430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic hepatitis B virus infection and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma by age and country of origin in people living in Sweden: A national register study
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2022 (English)In: Hepatology communications, E-ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 2418-2430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and surveillance is recommended for patients without cirrhosis when risk exceeds an incidence rate (IR) of 0.2%. Populations in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa have been associated with HCC at younger ages, but the risk after immigration to Western countries should be investigated. The aim of this study was to study HCC by age and country of origin in people with chronic HBV infection in Sweden. Through national registers, residents with chronic HBV diagnosis (1990-2015) were identified with information on country of origin, immigration/emigration, death, coinfections, antiviral therapy, and HCC. Observation time started at HBV diagnosis, and IR and hazard ratios for HCC were calculated by sex, age, and region of origin. Among 16,410 individuals (47% women), the origin and observation time (person years) were as follows: Western Europe, 2316 (25,415); Eastern Europe, 2349 (26,237); Middle East/North Africa, 4402 (47,320); sub-Saharan Africa, 3677 (30,565); Asia, 3537 (35,358); and other, 129 (1277). There were 232 individuals with HCC (82% in men). The IR increased with age and exceeded 0.2% for Asian men from age group 40-49 years (IR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.00), for men of other origins from age group 50-59 years, and for women aged ≥60 years originating from Eastern Europe, Asia, and Middle East/North Africa. After exclusion of patients with cirrhosis or HBV treatment, the IR still exceeded 0.2% in Asian men aged 40-49 years. This study demonstrates that HBV-infected men of Asian origin should be recommended HCC surveillance at younger ages, but there is a need for further studies of HCC incidence in African-born men without cirrhosis living in the Western world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98851 (URN)10.1002/hep4.1974 (DOI)000789942100001 ()35503810 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129241983 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Stockholm, 21080655Region Örebro County, OLL-507391 OLL-880331Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2017/434
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2022-09-29Bibliographically approved
Blach, S., Duberg, A.-S. & Razavi, H. A. (2022). Global change in hepatitis C virus prevalence and cascade of care between 2015 and 2020: a modelling study. The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 7(5), 396-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global change in hepatitis C virus prevalence and cascade of care between 2015 and 2020: a modelling study
2022 (English)In: The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 2468-1253, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 396-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Since the release of the first global hepatitis elimination targets in 2016, and until the COVID-19 pandemic started in early 2020, many countries and territories were making progress toward hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination. This study aims to evaluate HCV burden in 2020, and forecast HCV burden by 2030 given current trends.

Methods: This analysis includes a literature review, Delphi process, and mathematical modelling to estimate HCV prevalence (viraemic infection, defined as HCV RNA-positive cases) and the cascade of care among people of all ages (age =0 years from birth) for the period between Jan 1, 2015, and Dec 31, 2030. Epidemiological data were collected from published sources and grey literature (including government reports and personal communications) and were validated among country and territory experts. A Markov model was used to forecast disease burden and cascade of care from 1950 to 2050 for countries and territories with data. Model outcomes were extracted from 2015 to 2030 to calculate population-weighted regional averages, which were used for countries or territories without data. Regional and global estimates of HCV prevalence, cascade of care, and disease burden were calculated based on 235 countries and territories.

Findings: Models were built for 110 countries or territories: 83 were approved by local experts and 27 were based on published data alone. Using data from these models, plus population-weighted regional averages for countries and territories without models (n=125), we estimated a global prevalence of viraemic HCV infection of 0.7% (95% UI 0.7-0.9), corresponding to 56.8 million (95% UI 55.2-67.8) infections, on Jan 1, 2020. This number represents a decrease of 6.8 million viraemic infections from a 2015 (beginning of year) prevalence estimate of 63.6 million (61.8-75.8) infections (0.9% [0.8-1.0] prevalence). By the end of 2020, an estimated 12.9 million (12.5-15.4) people were living with a diagnosed viraemic infection. In 2020, an estimated 641 000 (623 000-765 000) patients initiated treatment.

Interpretation: At the beginning of 2020, there were an estimated 56.8 million viraemic HCV infections globally. Although this number represents a decrease from 2015, our forecasts suggest we are not currently on track to achieve global elimination targets by 2030. As countries recover from COVID-19, these findings can help refocus efforts aimed at HCV elimination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-100353 (URN)10.1016/S2468-1253(21)00472-6 (DOI)000820975100014 ()35180382 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128487734 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

John C Martin Foundation 2019-G024

Gilead Sciences IN-US-987-5808

AbbVie 4200907861

ZeShan Foundation 2021-0101-1-CDA-HEP-10

The Hepatitis Fund

 

Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan 19HC1001

Available from: 2022-07-29 Created: 2022-07-29 Last updated: 2022-07-29Bibliographically approved
Christensen, P. B., Debrabant, B., Cowan, S., Debrabant, K., Ovrehus, A. & Duberg, A.-S. (2022). Hepatitis C time trends in reported cases and estimates of the hidden population born before 1965, Denmark and Sweden, 1990 to 2020. Eurosurveillance, 27(50), 30-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hepatitis C time trends in reported cases and estimates of the hidden population born before 1965, Denmark and Sweden, 1990 to 2020
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2022 (English)In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 27, no 50, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: According to the World Health Organization, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection should be under control by 2030.

Aim: Our aim was to describe the size and temporal changes in reported cases of chronic HCV infection in Denmark and Sweden and to estimate the size of the hidden (undiagnosed) population born before 1965.

Methods: We extracted all HCV infections reported to national surveillance systems in Denmark and Sweden from 1990 to 2020. Prediction of the size of the hidden HCV-infected population was restricted to the cohort born before 1965 and cases reported up to 2017. We applied a model based on removal sampling from binomial distributions, estimated the yearly probability of diagnosis, and deducted the original HCV-infected population size.

Results: Denmark (clinician-based) reported 10 times fewer hepatitis C cases annually than Sweden (laboratory and clinician-based), peaking in 2007 (n = 425) and 1992 (n = 4,537), respectively. In Denmark, the birth year distribution was monophasic with little change over time. In recent years, Sweden has had a bimodal birth year distribution, suggesting ongoing infection in the young population. In 2017, the total HCV infected population born before 1965 was estimated at 10,737 living persons (95% confidence interval (CI): 9,744-11,806), including 5,054 undiagnosed, in Denmark and 16,124 (95% CI: 13,639-18,978), including 10,580 undiagnosed, in Sweden.

Conclusions: The reporting of HCV cases in Denmark and Sweden was different. For Denmark, the estimated hidden population was larger than the current national estimate, whereas in Sweden the estimate was in line with the latest published numbers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), 2022
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Infectious Diseases; Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103420 (URN)10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2022.27.50.2200243 (DOI)000912382500005 ()36695470 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144337496 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-24 Created: 2023-01-24 Last updated: 2023-02-21Bibliographically approved
Colombe, S., Axelsson, M., Aleman, S., Duberg, A.-S., Lundberg Ederth, J. & Dahl, V. (2022). Monitoring the progress towards the elimination of hepatitis B and C in Sweden: estimation of core indicators for 2015 and 2018. BMC Infectious Diseases, 22(1), Article ID 885.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring the progress towards the elimination of hepatitis B and C in Sweden: estimation of core indicators for 2015 and 2018
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2022 (English)In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 885Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: To monitor Sweden's progress towards the WHO goal of eliminating viral hepatitis, we estimated the prevalence, notification rate, and liver-related morbidity and mortality for diagnosed hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in 2015 and 2018.

METHODS: We identified cases of hepatitis B and C within the National System for Notifiable Diseases and obtained data on treatment and whether the case was deceased or not. We calculated prevalence, notification rates per 100,000, and proportion of newly diagnosed cases of hepatitis with liver disease at the time of diagnosis, and proportion of all deceased cases who died from liver disease. We calculated Poisson 95% confidence intervals (CIs) around the notification rates and Wilson 95% CIs around prevalence and mortality estimates.

RESULTS: In 2015 and 2018, the prevalence of diagnosed HBV infections was 0.20% [95% CI: 0.19-0.20] and 0.21% [0.20-0.21]. Notification rates per 100,000 for HBV infections were 13.02 [12.32-13.76] and 7.71 [7.18-8.27]. HBV liver-related morbidity was 2.65% [1.90-3.68] and 2.16% [1.35-3.43]. HBV liver-related mortality was 20.00% [14.81-26.44] and 17.95% [13.20-23.94]. In 2015 and 2018, the prevalence of diagnosed HCV-infections was 0.24% [0.24-0.25] and 0.18% [0.18-0.19]. Notification rates per 100,000 for HCV infections were 15.92 [15.14-16.73] and 13.05 [12.36-13.77]. HCV liver-related morbidity was 8.14% [6.89-9.60] and 3.90% [2.99-5.08]. HCV liver-related mortality was 27.08% [24.54-29.77] and 26.90% [24.12-29.88].

CONCLUSIONS: All indicators decreased or remained stable between 2015 and 2018, indicating progress in the elimination of viral hepatitis, especially for HCV infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Disease elimination, Surveillance, Viral hepatitis B, Viral hepatitis C
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102427 (URN)10.1186/s12879-022-07886-2 (DOI)000888737800001 ()36434533 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142611305 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-28 Created: 2022-11-28 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Duberg, A.-S., Lybeck, C., Fält, A., Montgomery, S. & Aleman, S. (2022). Reply Comment on risk of HCC with chronic hepatitis B infection in Sweden [Letter to the editor]. Hepatology communications, 6(12), 3593-3594
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reply Comment on risk of HCC with chronic hepatitis B infection in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Hepatology communications, E-ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 3593-3594Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley Periodicals Inc., 2022
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-100873 (URN)10.1002/hep4.2083 (DOI)000844568200001 ()36017781 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136689651 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-29 Created: 2022-08-29 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
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