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Bayram Özdemir, SevgiORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4568-2722
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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Bayram Özdemir, S., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2019). Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors. Child Development, 90(3), 808-824
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors
2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 808-824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine whether ethnic harassment was related to violent behaviors among immigrant youth over time and to identify the risk factors. The sample comprised immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (N = 365; Mage  = 13.93, SD = 0.80). Results showed that the more youth were ethnically harassed, the more they engaged in violent acts over time. A separated identity significantly moderated the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's engagement in violent behaviors. Specifically, ethnic harassment positively predicted engagement in violent behaviors only at high levels of separated identity. Impulsivity and school ethnic composition did not act as moderators. The findings suggest that preventing violent behaviors among immigrant youth requires a focus on promoting positive interethnic relationships, and multicultural identity among immigrant youth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62425 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12975 (DOI)000477640100016 ()29023668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031109803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Korol, L., Bayram Özdemir, S. & Stattin, H. (2019). Friend support as a buffer against engagement in problem behaviors among ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents. Journal of Early Adolescence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Friend support as a buffer against engagement in problem behaviors among ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents
2019 (English)In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The present study aims to investigate whether support from a friend protects against the negative effects of ethnic harassment on engagement in delinquent and violent behaviors among immigrant adolescents in Sweden (n = 365; X = 13.93, SD = .80). We found that when ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents received friend support, they were less likely to engage in problem behaviors concurrently. Yet, friend support did not moderate the longitudinal associations between ethnic harassment and problem behaviors. These findings highlight the important role of supportive friendship relations in counteracting the detrimental effects of ethnic harassment on externalizing problems, particularly in the short term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
ethnic harassment, delinquent and violent behaviors, friend support, immigrant adolescents
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77015 (URN)10.1177/0272431619880620 (DOI)000491598200001 ()
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Institute scholarship

Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-21Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S. & Özdemir, M. (2019). How do Adolescents' Perceptions of Relationships with Teachers Change during Upper-Secondary School Years?. Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do Adolescents' Perceptions of Relationships with Teachers Change during Upper-Secondary School Years?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The student-teacher relationship has mostly been assumed to be static. This approach is limited in providing information on how relationships with teachers evolve over time, and how possible changes affect young people's adjustment. To address this gap in knowledge, the present study examined whether adolescents follow different trajectories in their perceptions of relationship with teachers and whether students on different trajectories differ from each other in their adjustment. The sample included 829 students residing in Sweden (M-age = 13.43, SD = 0.55, 51% girls). Three distinct teacher-relationship trajectories were identified. More than half (66%) of the adolescents (average-stable trajectory) reported an average level of positive relationships with teachers at grade 7, and did not change significantly over the three years. About 24% of the adolescents (high-increasing trajectory) reported a high level of fair and supportive teacher-relationships at T1, and continued to increase in their positive views from grade 7 to grade 9. Ten percent of the adolescents (average-declining trajectory) reported an average level of positive relationships with teachers at grade 7, but showed a decline in their positive views towards teachers over time. Relative to adolescents on an average-stable trajectory, adolescents on a high-increasing trajectory reported greater school satisfaction, higher achievement values, and lower failure anticipation. By contrast, adolescents in the average-declining group reported worsening school adjustment. No significant moderating effects of immigrant status and gender were found. These findings highlight the importance of the association between the continuous experience of supportive and fair teacher treatment and youth adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Teacher-student relationship, School satisfaction, Teacher fairness, Teacher support
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77899 (URN)10.1007/s10964-019-01155-3 (DOI)000493643700002 ()31677083 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-0758
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Özdemir, M. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2019). Why Do Some Immigrant Adolescents Do Well in School Whereas Others Fail?: Current State of Knowledge and Directions for Future Research. In: Güngör, D. & Strohmeier, D. (Ed.), Contextualizing Immigrant Resilience: Cultural and Acculturation Perspectives. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Do Some Immigrant Adolescents Do Well in School Whereas Others Fail?: Current State of Knowledge and Directions for Future Research
2019 (English)In: Contextualizing Immigrant Resilience: Cultural and Acculturation Perspectives / [ed] Güngör, D. & Strohmeier, D., Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75881 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-08-26
Bayram Özdemir, S., Sun, S., Korol, L., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2018). Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47(6), 1151-1163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1151-1163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Social Work Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64044 (URN)10.1007/s10964-017-0795-0 (DOI)000431400400002 ()29294224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85039864223 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 201500282
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-09-16Bibliographically approved
Cheah, C. S. L., Leung, C. Y. Y. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2018). Chinese Malaysian Adolescents’ Social Cognitive Reasoning regarding Filial Piety Dilemmas. Child Development, 89(2), 383-396
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chinese Malaysian Adolescents’ Social Cognitive Reasoning regarding Filial Piety Dilemmas
2018 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 383-396Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the social-cognitive reasoning of 52 Chinese Malaysian preadolescents (9-12 years old; M = 11.02, SD = 0.94) and 68 adolescents (13-18 years old; M = 14.76, SD = 1.39) in resolving filial dilemmas within the personal and moral domain. Preadolescents deferred to parental authority, whereas adolescents endorsed filial obligation reasoning to justify compliance in the personal domain. Both appealed to filial obligation, pragmatic, or welfare and safety reasoning to justify compliance but fairness or rights reasoning to justify their noncompliance, for the moral issue. Distinctions between authoritarian and reciprocal filial piety reasoning were revealed. Findings demonstrated complex decision-making and cognitive reasoning processes among Chinese Malaysian adolescents as they negotiate their filial obligations and autonomy development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51655 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12725 (DOI)000427113700015 ()28105633 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85010220056 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-12 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Seo, Y. J., Cheah, C. S. L., Bayram Özdemir, S., Hart, C. H., Leung, C. Y. Y. & Sun, S. (2018). The Mediating Role of Korean Immigrant Mothers' Psychological Well-Being in the Associations between Social Support and Authoritarian Parenting Style. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 27(3), 979-989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Mediating Role of Korean Immigrant Mothers' Psychological Well-Being in the Associations between Social Support and Authoritarian Parenting Style
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 979-989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examined the mediating role of Korean immigrant mothers' psychological well-being in the associations between mothers' emotional vs. instrumental support received from their kin, and their authoritarian parenting style with their preschoolers using longitudinal data. First-generation Korean immigrant mothers with preschool-aged children (N = 158; M (maternal age) = 36.11 years, SD = 3.90; M (child age) = 4.43 years, SD = 1.10) residing in Maryland, U.S., participated in three assessment waves. Each assessment wave was 6 months apart. Mothers reported on the amount of perceived emotional and instrumental support they received from their kin, their behavioral acculturation towards the American culture, and their family demographic information at Wave 1, their psychological well-being at Wave 2, and their authoritarian parenting style at Wave 3. The results revealed that higher levels of perceived instrumental support (but not emotional support) received from kin predicted higher levels of maternal psychological well-being 6 months later, which in turn predicted lower levels of reported authoritarian parenting style 6 months later. Our findings highlighted the importance of psychological well-being as a mechanism that explains how instrumental support can impact Korean immigrant mothers' parenting style, and the importance of distinguishing between types of support. Services providing instrumental support (e.g., childcare assistance) for first-generation immigrant mothers, particularly those with smaller or less effective kin networks, appear important to implement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Emotional and instrumental support, Psychological well-being, Authoritarian parenting style, Korean immigrant mothers
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65912 (URN)10.1007/s10826-017-0936-9 (DOI)000426297700029 ()2-s2.0-85033500750 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  1R03HD052827-01 

Marjorie Pay Hinckley Endowed Chair  

Zina Young Williams Card Professorship at Brigham Young University 

Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Dimitrova, R., Bayram Özdemir, S., Farcas, D., Kosic, M., Mastrotheodoros, S., Michalek, J. & Stefenel, D. (2017). Is There a Paradox of Adaptation in Immigrant Children and Youth across Europe?: A Literature Review. In: Radosveta Dimitrova (Ed.), Well-being of Youth and Emerging Adults Across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is There a Paradox of Adaptation in Immigrant Children and Youth across Europe?: A Literature Review
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2017 (English)In: Well-being of Youth and Emerging Adults Across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Springer, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Series
Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology, E-ISSN 2210-5417 ; 12
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62177 (URN)9783319683638 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S. & Cheah, C. S. L. (2017). Mothers’ Reactions to Preschoolers’ Proactive and Reactive Aggressive Behaviors. Infant and Child Development, 26(2), Article ID UNSP e1972.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers’ Reactions to Preschoolers’ Proactive and Reactive Aggressive Behaviors
2017 (English)In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 26, no 2, article id UNSP e1972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study was designed to examine mothers' emotional reactions, causal attributions, and socialization strategies in response to preschool children's engagement in proactive and reactive physical aggression with peers during free play at school. Participants were 84 mothers (Mage=31.83, SD=4.48) with preschool-aged children (Mage=4.92, SD=0. 97), residing in Ankara, Turkey. Supporting our expectations, mothers reacted with negative emotions to both functions of aggressive behaviours, with less anxiety, disappointment, embarrassment, and guilt for reactive aggression. They also believed that reactive aggression is more contextually dependent and intentional and reported more indirect (e.g., asking the child, teacher, or other children to find out more about the situation and aggressive episode) and other-oriented strategies (e.g., telling the other child to behave properly) to address these behaviours. Overall, our findings suggest that Turkish mothers' feelings, perceptions, and socialization approaches to childhood aggression vary depending on the functions of aggression, and mothers perceive preschool-aged children's engagement in reactive aggression in the school setting as relatively more acceptable than proactive aggression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
proactive aggression; reactive aggression; parenting; Turkey; parenting; beliefs
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46809 (URN)10.1002/icd.1972 (DOI)000398588000005 ()2-s2.0-84963815354 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Cheah, C. S. L. & Coplan, R. J. (2017). Processes and conditions underlying the link between shyness and school adjustment among Turkish children. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 35(2), 218-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Processes and conditions underlying the link between shyness and school adjustment among Turkish children
2017 (English)In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835X, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 218-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the underlying processes and conditions that contribute to the school adjustment of shy children in Turkey, where children's interpersonal relationships in social settings and academic achievement are highly emphasized. First, we examined the unique mediating roles of children's feelings of social anxiety, depressive symptoms, and loneliness in the associations between shyness and indices of school outcomes (academic achievement and school liking/avoidance). Second, we explored the moderating role of children's peer acceptance in these associations. Fourth- and fifth-grade children (N = 599; Mage  = 10.11 years, SD = 0.65; 48% girls) provided information on shyness, social anxiety, depressive symptoms, loneliness, and school liking/avoidance. Head teachers in each classroom reported on students' academic performance. The peer nomination method was used to assess children's peer relationships. Results revealed that when children displayed shy behaviours, they reported more depressive symptoms that were, in turn, associated with poorer academic performance, less school liking, and higher school avoidance. Moreover, shyness negatively predicted school liking at low levels of peer acceptance, suggesting that difficulties in peer relationships increased shy children's risk of school dissatisfaction. Overall, our findings support the importance of the interpersonal relationship context for children's adjustment within the Turkish cultural context. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Shy children have difficulties initiating and maintaining social interactions, which put them at risk for a wide range of socio-emotional difficulties. Shy children have poor academic performance and experience school adjustment difficulties in North America. What does this study add? Shyness is an important risk factor for poorer academic performance and adjustment among children in Turkey. The association between shyness and difficulties at school is explained by children's experience of depressive symptoms. Difficulties with peer relationships increase shy children's risk of school dissatisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Turkey, academic performance, school adjustment; shyness, social withdrawal
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52521 (URN)10.1111/bjdp.12158 (DOI)000405227200004 ()27653012 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84997766175 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4568-2722

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