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Bayram Özdemir, SevgiORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4568-2722
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Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Bowker, J. C., Sette, S., Ooi, L., Bayram Özdemir, S., Braathu, N., Bølstad, E., . . . Coplan, R. J. (2023). Cross-cultural measurement of social withdrawal motivations across 10 countries using multiple-group factor analysis alignment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 47(2), 190-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-cultural measurement of social withdrawal motivations across 10 countries using multiple-group factor analysis alignment
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 190-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The goal of this study was to evaluate the measurement invariance of an adapted assessment of motivations for social withdrawal (Social Preference Scale-Revised; SPS-R) across cultural contexts and explore associations with loneliness. Participants were a large sample of university students (N = 4,397; M-age = 20.08 years, SD = 2.96; 66% females) from 10 countries (Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, India, Italy, South Korea, Norway, Turkey, and the United States). With this cross-cultural focus, we illustrate the multiple-group factor analysis alignment method, an approach developed to assess measurement invariance when there are several groups. Results indicated approximate measurement invariance across the 10 country groups. Additional analyses indicated that overall, shyness, avoidance, and unsociability are three related, but distinct factors, with some notable country differences evident (e.g., in China, India, and Turkey). Shyness and avoidance were related positively to loneliness in all countries, but the strength of the association between shyness and loneliness differed in Italy and India relative to the other countries. Results also indicated that unsociability was related positively to loneliness in the United States only. Theoretical and assessment implications are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Social Preference Scale-R, multiple-group factor analysis alignment, social withdrawal motivations, loneliness, culture, university students
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-100831 (URN)10.1177/01650254221132774 (DOI)000878798200001 ()2-s2.0-85141647972 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Insight Grant 4352017-0849

Available from: 2022-08-24 Created: 2022-08-24 Last updated: 2023-06-15Bibliographically approved
Özdemir, M. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2023). Psychometric evaluation and measurement equivalence of the Adolescents' Societal Belongingness Scale (ASBS). European Journal of Developmental Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation and measurement equivalence of the Adolescents' Societal Belongingness Scale (ASBS)
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Societal belongingness - feelings of being a connected, an affiliated, and a respected member of the larger society - may contribute to the understanding of adolescent development both as a person and a member of society in a multicultural context. The current study examined the psychometric properties and measurement invariance of the Adolescents' Societal Belongingness Scale (ASBS) using data from 12- to 15-year-old youth (N = 1065, M-age = 13.12, SD = .42, 45% female). Multiple group CFA models revealed configural, scalar, and metric invariance of the societal belongingness scale across adolescents with immigrant, mixed, and Swedish backgrounds. The scale scores were positively correlated with class belonging and social trust and negatively correlated with depressive symptoms and delinquency. Between-group differences across immigrant, mixed-heritage, and native youth provided further evidence for the sensitivity of the measure. Overall, the current findings suggest that the societal belongingness scale could be used for studying the sense of belonging towards the larger society across adolescents of immigrant, mixed, and majority backgrounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Societal belongingness, the need to belong, sense of belonging, social belonging, adolescence
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105413 (URN)10.1080/17405629.2023.2191944 (DOI)000953032600001 ()2-s2.0-85150796860 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01057
Available from: 2023-04-12 Created: 2023-04-12 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Cucurachi, S., Yanagida, T. & Özdemir, M. (2023). Understanding the association between moral disengagement and ethnic victimization: roles of bystanders in class. European Journal of Developmental Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the association between moral disengagement and ethnic victimization: roles of bystanders in class
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The current study examined whether bystander behaviours in class were associated with being perpetrators of ethnic victimization and whether they moderated the association between disengagement from morality and perpetrating ethnic-based victimization. The sample included 1065 adolescents residing in Sweden (Mage = 13.12, SD=.42; 55% males) from the first wave of a three-year longitudinal study. Students completed self-report measures. The results showed that adolescents with high levels of moral disengagement had greater likelihood of engagement in ethnic victimization. At the classroom level, lower levels of defending intentions and higher levels of reinforcing behaviours were related to higher likelihood of engagement in ethnic victimization. None of the cross-level interactions between moral disengagement and classroom-level bystander behaviours were statistically significant. Together, these findings suggest that intervention programmes designed to reduce bias-based hostile behaviours in schools may focus on promoting defending behaviours in class. However, the findings also highlight that targeting social context (or at least bystanders in class) might not be sufficient by itself to intervene with morally disengaged adolescents' involvement in ethnic victimization. Intervention efforts may also benefit from including specific components targeting moral disengagement mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Ethnic victimization, moral disengagement, bystander behaviours
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109509 (URN)10.1080/17405629.2023.2280088 (DOI)001099876700001 ()2-s2.0-85176308082 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01057
Available from: 2023-10-31 Created: 2023-10-31 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Yanagida, T. & Özdemir, M. (2022). Bystanders of Ethnic Victimization: Do Classroom Context and Teachers’ Approach Matter for How Adolescents Intend to Act?. Child Development, 93(5), 1540-1558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bystanders of Ethnic Victimization: Do Classroom Context and Teachers’ Approach Matter for How Adolescents Intend to Act?
2022 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 1540-1558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study examined how adolescents' individual characteristics and class context are related to bystander behaviors in cases of ethnic victimization. The sample included 1065 adolescents in Sweden (M-age = 13.12, SD = 0.42; 55%males). Female adolescents, adolescents of immigrant background, and adolescents with positive attitudes toward immigrants had greater intentions to defend and comfort victimized peers. Positive inter-ethnic contact norms in class were positively associated with intention to comfort the victim. Teachers' non-tolerance of ethnic victimization was positively related to adolescents' intentions to ask the perpetrator to stop and talk to teacher. The effects were the same across adolescents with different attitudes toward immigrants. Findings highlight the importance of class context and teachers in fostering adolescents' prosocial and assertive interventions in bias-based hostile behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98511 (URN)10.1111/cdev.13822 (DOI)000825977000001 ()35841302 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134171324 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01057
Available from: 2022-04-07 Created: 2022-04-07 Last updated: 2022-11-30Bibliographically approved
Glatz, T., Bayram Özdemir, S. & Boersma, K. (2022). Parental Child-Invested Contingent Self-Esteem as a Source of Acculturation-Related Parent-Child Conflicts Among Latino Families. Journal of Family Issues, 43(7), 1826-1849, Article ID 0192513X211030044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental Child-Invested Contingent Self-Esteem as a Source of Acculturation-Related Parent-Child Conflicts Among Latino Families
2022 (English)In: Journal of Family Issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1826-1849, article id 0192513X211030044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most parents want their children to succeed well. For some parents, however, children's successes are strongly related to beliefs about their own self-worth; a concept known as parental child-invested contingent self-esteem, which has shown links to negative parenting practices (e.g., psychological control). Less is known about associations with aspects of the parent-child relationship that are particularly relevant among families with immigrant backgrounds. We examine the associations with acculturation-related conflicts in a sample of 180 Latino parents of children in 6th to 12th grade. Results showed that higher levels of parental child-invested contingent self-esteem was significantly linked to higher levels of acculturation conflicts, but this link was especially strong if the parent reported that their child was unresponsive to their corrections. When parents base their self-worth on their child's successes and the child acts in ways that are not in line with parents' expectations, parents report more acculturation-related conflicts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
parenting, parent-child conflicts, parental child-invested contingent self-esteem, child temperament
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-93389 (URN)10.1177/0192513X211030044 (DOI)000673321700001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 350-2012-283
Available from: 2021-08-06 Created: 2021-08-06 Last updated: 2022-06-21Bibliographically approved
Västhagen, M., Özdemir, M., Ghaderi, A., Kimber, B., Giles, C. J., Bayram Özdemir, S., . . . Enebrink, P. (2022). Refugee parents’ experiences of coming to Sweden: A qualitative study. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 91, 97-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refugee parents’ experiences of coming to Sweden: A qualitative study
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, ISSN 0147-1767, E-ISSN 1873-7552, Vol. 91, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Each year, millions of people worldwide are forced to leave their homes. Many of those affected are families. There are already a considerable number of initiatives designed to support refugees who are resettling in new countries and cultures. However, few are promotive interventions aiming to support parents and thereby their children through the extraordinary challenges they face. To develop a culturally adaptive intervention, more knowledge about how refugee parents from different countries perceive and handle these challenges is needed. This study explores refugee parents’ own perspectives on the obstacles, challenges and opportunities they faced during their first years in Sweden to guide the future development of promotive interventions for refugee parents. Interviews were conducted with Arabic, Kurdish, and Somali-speaking refugee parents (n = 28; 19 mothers, 9 fathers). The interviews were examined using content analysis. One overarching theme emerged; “The new language is the key for entering social networks and society, and for helping your child in a new country”. The new language was viewed as a key to integration, and to mastering parenthood in the new context. This theme consisted of four categories; “parents’ motivation and hope as driving forces,” “navigating among past and present culture and values”, “loneliness as a risk factor” and “a new way of being a parent and relating to an acculturation gap”. These findings may help guide the development of parenting interventions for refugees, to promote integration and well-being among parents and their children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Qualitative study, Parenthood, Refugees, Integration
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-101064 (URN)10.1016/j.ijintrel.2022.08.010 (DOI)000894321100009 ()2-s2.0-85138052905 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2022-09-02 Created: 2022-09-02 Last updated: 2023-01-04Bibliographically approved
Bauducco, S., Özdemir, M., Gradisar, M., Boersma, K. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2022). Trajectories of insomnia symptoms and insufficient sleep duration in early adolescents: associations with school stress. SLEEP Advances, 3(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trajectories of insomnia symptoms and insufficient sleep duration in early adolescents: associations with school stress
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2022 (English)In: SLEEP Advances, E-ISSN 2632-5012, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives: We examined how adolescents’ sleep patterns (i.e. insomnia symptoms and sleep duration) change from early- to mid-adolescence and whether adolescents follow different trajectories. Furthermore, we also examined the characteristics of adolescents within different trajectories, with a specific focus on the role of school-related stress.

Methods: We used three longitudinal waves of questionnaire data collected annually from a sample of Swedish adolescents (n = 1294; Mage = 13.2 [range: 12–15 years], SD = .42; 46.8% girls). Using established measures, the students reported on their sleep duration, insomnia symptoms, and perceived school-stress (including stress of school performance, peer and teacher relations, attendance, and school-leisure conflict). We used latent class growth analysis (LCGA) to identify adolescents’ sleep trajectories, and the BCH method to describe the characteristics of the adolescents in each trajectory.

Results: We found four trajectories for adolescents’ insomnia symptoms; (1) low insomnia (69%), (2) low-increasing (17%, ‘emerging risk-group’), (3) high-decreasing (9%), (4) high-increasing (5%; ‘risk-group’). For sleep duration, we found two trajectories; (1) ~8 h sufficient-decreasing (85%), (2) ~7 h insufficient- decreasing (15%; ‘risk-group’). Adolescents in risk-trajectories were more likely to be girls and consistently reported higher levels of school stress, particularly regarding school performance and attending school.ConclusionsSchool stress was prominent among adolescents suffering from persistent sleep problems, especially insomnia, and deserves further attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
developmental trends, daily stressors, teenagers, sleep patterns, short sleep, academic stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99734 (URN)10.1093/sleepadvances/zpac018 (DOI)37193399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174064536 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVinnovaSwedish Research Council, 2012-65Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2022-06-27 Created: 2022-06-27 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Yanagida, T. & Özdemir, M. (2021). Bystanders of ethnic victimization: Do classroom context and teachers’ approach matter on how adolescents intend to act?. In: : . Paper presented at Biennial Meeting of European Association for Developmental Psychology (EADP Summer Tour 2021), September 17, 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bystanders of ethnic victimization: Do classroom context and teachers’ approach matter on how adolescents intend to act?
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98215 (URN)
Conference
Biennial Meeting of European Association for Developmental Psychology (EADP Summer Tour 2021), September 17, 2021
Available from: 2022-03-22 Created: 2022-03-22 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2021). Ethnic harassment and self-harm among immigrant adolescents. Psychology of Violence, 11(2), 164-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic harassment and self-harm among immigrant adolescents
2021 (English)In: Psychology of Violence, ISSN 2152-0828, E-ISSN 2152-081X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 164-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Immigrant adolescents are at risk of harming themselves. Interpersonal or acculturative stressors, including ethnic harassment, may contribute to adolescents’ engagement in self-harm. Despite a growing interest in the link between ethnic harassment and self-harm among immigrant youth, we have limited knowledge on the conditions that make ethnically harassed adolescents likely to self-harm. Thus, we aimed (a) to examine reasons why ethnically harassed youth self-harm and (b) to identify the conditions that elevate ethnically harassed youth’s engagement in self-harm.

Method: A total of 536 first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (261 girls; Mage = 14.42; SD = 1.01) participated in the study and were followed over 1 year. Adolescents who reported more depressive symptoms and who harmed themselves were more likely to drop out. Results: The cross-sectional results showed that when adolescents were exposed to ethnic harassment, they felt more depressed, and they engaged in self-harm. This pattern was especially true for adolescents who had a strong desire to be perceived as part of the majority (βindirect = .07, z = 2.81, p = .01, 95% confidence interval [.03, .13]). These results were not confirmed longitudinally.

Conclusion: The cross-sectional findings suggest that immigrant adolescents wanting to be part of Swedish society may experience a clash between that desire and the responses they get from the society and may use self-harm as a viable way of overcoming ethnic-devaluation experiences. Future studies are needed to replicate our lack of longitudinal results and to provide explanations for this pattern of association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2021
Keywords
ethnic harassment, self-harm, depressive symptoms, need to be perceived as part of the majority, adolescence
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-86161 (URN)10.1037/vio0000371 (DOI)000638995000006 ()2-s2.0-85103491568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-05 Created: 2020-10-05 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Özdemir, M. & Kharel, N. (2021). Experiences of Cultural Clashes at Home and Ethnic Victimization in School: “I Live Between Two Cultures, and Neither of Them Understands Me”. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development (177), 179-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Cultural Clashes at Home and Ethnic Victimization in School: “I Live Between Two Cultures, and Neither of Them Understands Me”
2021 (English)In: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, no 177, p. 179-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aims to examine the extent to which adolescents of immigrant background experience acculturative stress (i.e., cultural clashes with parents and ethnic victimization in school) in multiple contexts, and the reasons why such stress takes a toll on their psychological functioning and views of themselves. The analytic sample includes adolescents of immigrant background residing in Sweden (N=423, Mage=13.19, SD=.51). Cluster analysis revealed five distinct groups of adolescents, based on their reports of cultural clashes with parents and ethnic victimization in school: (1) low on both acculturative stressors, (2) average on both acculturative stressors, (3) high on cultural clashes only, (4) high on ethnic victimization only, and (5) high on both acculturative stressors. Mediation analysis showed that adolescents who experienced cultural clashes at home and who were also victimized by their peers in school reported higher levels of feeling in between cultures than adolescents in all the other clusters (except those high on cultural clashes only), and in turn reported higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower levels of self-esteem. The present study highlights the importance of understanding immigrant youth’s experiences across multiple contexts simultaneously in order to develop a holistic perspective on their adjustment and integration processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
Cultural clashes at home, ethnic victimization, feeling in between, identity, migration
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90602 (URN)10.1002/cad.20416 (DOI)000747213200010 ()34050702 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114697967 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01057
Available from: 2021-03-19 Created: 2021-03-19 Last updated: 2022-02-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4568-2722

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