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Biswas, Animesh
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Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Biswas, A., Halim, M. A., Dalal, K. & Rahman, F. (2016). Exploration of social factors associated to maternal deaths due to haemorrhage and convulsions: Analysis of 28 social autopsies in rural Bangladesh. BMC Health Services Research, 16(1), Article ID 659.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration of social factors associated to maternal deaths due to haemorrhage and convulsions: Analysis of 28 social autopsies in rural Bangladesh
2016 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social autopsy is an innovative approach to explore social barriers and factors associated to a death in the community. The process also sensitize the community people to avert future deaths. Social autopsy has been introduced in maternal deaths in Bangladesh first time in 2010. This study is to identify the social factors in the rural community associated to maternal deaths. It also looks at how the community responses in social autopsy intervention to prevent future maternal deaths.

Methods: The study was conducted in the Thakurgaon district of Bangladesh in 2010. We have purposively selected 28 social autopsy cases of which maternal deaths occurred due to either haemorrhage or due to convulsions. The autopsy was conducted by the Government health and family planning first line field supervisors in rural community. Family members and neighbours of the deceased participated in each autopsy and provided their comments and responses.

Results: A number of social factors including delivery conducted by the untrained birth attendant or family members, delays in understanding about maternal complications, delays in decision making to transfer the mother, lack of proper knowledge, education and traditional myth influences the maternal deaths. The community identified their own problems, shared within them and decide upon rectify themselves for future death prevention.

Conclusions: Social autopsy is a useful tools to identify social community within the community by discussing the factors that took place during a maternal death. The process supports villagers to think and change their behavioural patterns and commit towards preventing such deaths in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Maternal death, social autopsy, death review, rural community, Bangladesh
National Category
Social Work Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53598 (URN)10.1186/s12913-016-1912-6 (DOI)000388140000006 ()27846877 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994884924 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

UNICEF, Bangladesh

Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Dalal, K., Abdullah, A. S., Gifford, M. & Halim, M. (2016). Maternal complications in a geographically challenging and hard to reach district of Bangladesh: a qualitative study. F1000 Research, 5, Article ID 2417.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal complications in a geographically challenging and hard to reach district of Bangladesh: a qualitative study
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2016 (English)In: F1000 Research, E-ISSN 2046-1402, Vol. 5, article id 2417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Maternal complications contribute to maternal deaths in developing countries. Bangladesh still has a high prevalence of maternal mortality, which is often preventable. There are some geographically challenging and hard to reach rural districts in Bangladesh and it is difficult to get information about maternal complications in these areas. In this study, we examined the community lay knowledge of possible pregnancy complications. We also examined the common practices associated with complications and we discuss the challenges for the community.

Methods: The study was conducted in Moulvibazar of north east Bangladesh, a geographically challenged, difficult to reach district. Qualitative methods were used to collect the information. Pregnant women, mothers who had recently delivered, their guardians and traditional birth attendants participated in focus group discussions. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with the family members. Thematic analyses were performed.

Results: The study revealed that there is a lack of knowledge of maternal complications. In the majority of cases, the mothers did not receive proper treatment for maternal complications. There are significant challenges that these rural societies need to address: problems of ignorance, traditional myths and family restrictions on seeking better treatment. Moreover, traditional birth attendants and village doctors also have an important role in assuring appropriate, effective and timely treatment.

Conclusions: The rural community lacks adequate knowledge on maternal complications. Reduction of the societal barriers including barriers within the family can improve overall practices. Moreover, dissemination of adequate information to the traditional birth attendant and village doctors may improve the overall situation, which would eventually help to reduce maternal deaths.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Faculty of 1000 Ltd., 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54776 (URN)10.12688/f1000research.9445.1 (DOI)27853517 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Rahman Mashreky, S., Dalal, K. & Deave, T. (2016). Response to an earthquake in Bangladesh: Experiences and Lesson Learnt. Open Journal of Earthquake Research, 5, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response to an earthquake in Bangladesh: Experiences and Lesson Learnt
2016 (English)In: Open Journal of Earthquake Research, ISSN 2169-9631, Vol. 5, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A powerful earthquake occurred in Nepal on 25th April 2015 where the highest measure of the tremor was 7.9 on the Richter scale with a minimum of 6.6. The death toll was around 3000 and thousands were injured in the devastation of the disaster. The earthquake and subsequent earth tremors were also felt in other South East Asian countries including Bangladesh, India and China. Bangladesh was jolted twice by tremors and, although the tremor was not as severe, it was reported to be between 4 and 5 on the Richter scale. Aftershocks over the next few days were also experienced and these ranged around 5 on the Richter scale. In Bangladesh, six lives were lost, and more than 200 people were injured and were taken to hospital. There were also many buildings that collapsed in the mega city Dhaka and its surrounding areas. This study describes the country’s response to the earthquake. This experience and the lessons learnt highlight the importance for national earthquake-proof building regulations and systems to lessen the damage and devastation of any future earthquake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine, USA: Scientific Research Publishing, 2016
Keywords
Component, formatting, style, styling
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47971 (URN)10.4236/ojer.2016.51001 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Rahman, F., Eriksson, C., Halim, A. & Dalal, K. (2016). Social Autopsy of maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in rural Bangladesh: qualitative exploration of its effect and community acceptance. BMJ Open, 6(8), Article ID e010490.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Autopsy of maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in rural Bangladesh: qualitative exploration of its effect and community acceptance
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2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 8, article id e010490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Social Autopsy (SA) is an innovative strategy where a trained facilitator leads community groups through a structured, standardised analysis of the physical, environmental, cultural and social factors contributing to a serious, non-fatal health event or death. The discussion stimulated by the formal process of SA determines the causes and suggests preventative measures that are appropriate and achievable in the community. Here we explored individual experiences of SA, including acceptance and participant learning, and its effect on rural communities in Bangladesh. The present study had explored the experiences gained while undertaking SA of maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths in rural Bangladesh.

Design: Qualitative assessment of documents, observations, focus group discussions, group discussions and in-depth interviews by content and thematic analyses.

Results: Each community's maternal and neonatal death was a unique, sad story. SA undertaken by government field-level health workers were well accepted by rural communities. SA had the capability to explore the social reasons behind the medical cause of the death without apportioning blame to any individual or group. SA was a useful instrument to raise awareness and encourage community responses to errors within the society that contributed to the death. People participating in SA showed commitment to future preventative measures and devised their own solutions for the future prevention of maternal and neonatal deaths.

Conclusions: SA highlights societal errors and promotes discussion around maternal or newborn death. SA is an effective means to deliver important preventative messages and to sensitise the community to death issues. Importantly, the community itself is enabled to devise future strategies to avert future maternal and neonatal deaths in Bangladesh.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51903 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010490 (DOI)000382336700018 ()27554100 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84984700599 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

UNICEF, Bangladesh via Canadian CIDA (DFATD)

Department for International Development (DFID)

European Commission (EC)

Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Halim, A., Rahman, F., Eriksson, C. & Dalal, K. (2016). The Economic Cost of Implementing Maternal and Neonatal Death Review in a District of Bangladesh. Journal of Public Health Research, 5(3), 99-103, Article ID 729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Economic Cost of Implementing Maternal and Neonatal Death Review in a District of Bangladesh
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 99-103, article id 729Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Maternal and neonatal death review (MNDR) introduced in Bangladesh and initially piloted in a district during 2010. MNDR is able to capture each of the maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths from the community and government facilities (hospitals). This study aimed to estimate the cost required to implement MNDR in a district of Bangladesh during 2010-2012.

Materials and Methods: MNDR was implemented in Thakurgaon district in 2010 and later gradually extended until 2015. MNDR implementation framework, guidelines, tools and manual were developed at the national level with national level stakeholders including government health and family planning staff at different cadre for piloting at Thakurgaon. Programme implementation costs were calculated by year of costing and costing as per component of MNDR in 2013. The purchasing power parity conversion rate was 1 $INT = 24.46 BDT, as of 31st Dec 2012.

Results: Overall programme implementation costs required to run MNDR were 109,02,754 BDT (445,738 $INT $INT) in the first year (2010). In the following years cost reduced to 8,208,995 BDT (335,609 $INT, during 2011) and 6,622,166 BDT (270,735 $INT, during 2012). The average cost per activity required was 3070 BDT in 2010, 1887 BDT and 2207 BDT required in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Each death notification cost 4.09 $INT, verbal autopsy cost 8.18 $INT, and social autopsy cost 16.35 $INT. Facility death notification cost 2.04 $INT and facility death review meetings cost 20.44 $INT. One death saved by MNDR costs 53,654 BDT (2193 $INT).

Conclusions: Programmatic implementation cost of conducting MPDR give an idea on how much cost will be required to run a death review system for a low income country settings using government health system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pavia, Italy: PagePress, 2016
Keywords
Cost, death review, Bangladesh, aternal and neonatal health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54774 (URN)10.4081/jphr.2016.729 (DOI)000395253800001 ()28090477 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007529363 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

UNICEF, Bangladesh via Canadian CIDA (DFATD)

Department for International Development (DFID)

European Commission (EC)

Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Halim, A., Dewez, J. E., Biswas, A., Rahman, F., White, S. & van den Broek, N. (2016). When, Where, and Why Are Babies Dying?: Neonatal Death Surveillance and Review in Bangladesh. PLoS ONE, 11(8), Article ID e0159388.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When, Where, and Why Are Babies Dying?: Neonatal Death Surveillance and Review in Bangladesh
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, article id e0159388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Better data on cause of, and factors contributing to, neonatal deaths are needed to improve interventions aimed at reducing neonatal mortality in low-and middle-income countries.

Methods: Community surveillance to identify all neonatal deaths across four districts in Bangladesh. Verbal autopsy for every fifth case and InterVA-4 used to assign likely cause of death.

Findings: 6748 neonatal deaths identified, giving a neonatal mortality rate of 24.4 per 1000 live births. Of these, 51.3% occurred in the community and 48.7% at or on the way to a health facility. Almost half (46.1%) occurred within 24 hours of birth with 83.6% of all deaths occurring in the first seven days of life. Birth asphyxia was the leading cause of death (43%), followed by infections (29.3%), and prematurity (22.2%). In 68.3% of cases, care had been provided at a health facility before death occurred. Care-seeking was significantly higher among mothers who were educated (RR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.04-1.35) or who delivered at a health facility (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.37-1.60) and lower among mothers who had 2-4 previous births (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96), for baby girls (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80-0.93), and for low birth weight babies (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96).

Interpretation: Most parents of neonates who died had accessed and received care from a qualified health-care provider. To further reduce neonatal mortality, it is important that the quality of care provided, particularly skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care, and neonatal care during the first month of life is improved, such that it is timely, safe, and effective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52508 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0159388 (DOI)000381110300011 ()27478900 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84982136517 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

DFID 202945-101    PCA-UNICEF/PCA/2011/015    PCA-UNICEF/PCA/2012/009 

Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Rahman Mashkreky, S., Abdullah, A. S. & Dalal, K. (2015). A manmade urban disaster caused a child death: Experience and lessons learnt from a tragic case study in Bangladesh. International Journal of Current Research, 7(6), 17383-17386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A manmade urban disaster caused a child death: Experience and lessons learnt from a tragic case study in Bangladesh
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Current Research, ISSN 0975-833X, E-ISSN 0975-833X, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 17383-17386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
India: International Journal of Current Research, 2015
Keywords
Fall injury, manmade disaster, child, Bangladesh
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47965 (URN)
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Dalal, K., Shabnam, J. & Biswas, A. (2015). Condom using perception among sex-buying men in India. Science Journal of Public Health, 3(6), 825-829
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Condom using perception among sex-buying men in India
2015 (English)In: Science Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2328-7950, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 825-829Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The study explores condom use among sex-buying men in India. The study also identifies the level of knowledge regarding the contraction of sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s) and AIDS in relation to condom use.

Methods: The observational study has designed in where purposively 156 Men were selected who reported that they paid for sex and used a condom during in the last 12 months. Respondents were from 29 Indian states during 2005-2006. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS Statistics version 20.0 for window for statistical analysis.

Results: Majority of sex buyers were found in between 25-34 years age group, middle and higher income group were found more to buy sex than poor group. 77% of the participants used condoms every time they had paid sex with the female partner, majority of men had a good knowledge on AIDS ( 89%) and 78.8% has a believe that condom using can reduce risk of contaminated with HIV.

Conclusion: Middle aged men in India with a high socio-economic status and educational background have a better perception, knowledge and attitude towards using condom during sex buying and have knowledge on HIV, however low poverty level men are vulnerable and they are expose to contamination with HIV AIDS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, United States: Science Publishing Group, 2015
Keywords
AIDS, condom use behavior, India, sex-buying Men, STD
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47961 (URN)10.11648/j.sjph.20150306.14 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Rahman, F., Halim, A., Eriksson, C. & Dalal, K. (2015). Experiences of community verbal autopsy in maternal and newborn health in Bangladesh. HealthMed, 9(8), 329-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of community verbal autopsy in maternal and newborn health in Bangladesh
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2015 (English)In: HealthMed, ISSN 1840-2291, E-ISSN 1986-8103, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Verbal autopsy in maternal and neonatal deaths is commonly used in developing countries to understand the medical and social causes of death in the community. Bangladesh first undertook a community verbal autopsy program in 2010. This was implemented under the maternal and neonatal death review (MNDR) system.

Objectives: To know the process of implementation of community verbal autopsy, its acceptability and effect in maternal and neonatal health, Bangladesh.

Methods: A qualitative study was performed In two districts of Bangladesh in 2011. A review of documents, observations, focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with health care providers from different systems. Data were analysed using a thematic approach

Results: Community verbal autopsy was developed in Bangladesh using existing available tools and guidelines. First line field supervisors from health and family planning departments conducted verbal autopsies at the deceased’s home. It has been adopted within the government health system and is able to identify medical and social causes, including delays within the community that are the major contributing factors of maternal and neonatal deaths. Verbal autopsy findings are shared at the Upazila level (sub-district) and these influence the development and implementation of local action plans. Recall bias and hard to reach areas are still challenges to be overcome in the conduction of verbal autopsies.

Conclusions: The use of community verbal autopsy to identify medical and social causes of maternal and neonatal deaths is possible in an encouraging country context. The Government health system can comfortably conduct autopsies within the community. The findings of autopsy can be an effective tool and can be used by the local health and family planning managers to take the initiative at local level to improve health status of the mother and newborn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina: D R U N P P, 2015
Keywords
Verbal autopsy, maternal death, neonatal death, Bangladesh
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47963 (URN)
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Rahman, F., Halim, A., Eriksson, C. & Dalal, K. (2015). Experiences of Community Verbal Autopsy in Maternal and Newborn Health of Bangladesh. , 9(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Community Verbal Autopsy in Maternal and Newborn Health of Bangladesh
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2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46529 (URN)
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
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