oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 153) Show all publications
Bruni, M. P., Freitas da Silveira, M., Stauffert, D., Bicca, G. L., Caetano Dos Santos, C., da Rosa Farias, N. A., . . . Unemo, M. (2019). Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis assay elucidates significant underdiagnosis of trichomoniasis among women in Brazil according to an observational study. Sexually Transmitted Infections (2), 129-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis assay elucidates significant underdiagnosis of trichomoniasis among women in Brazil according to an observational study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, no 2, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: (TV) infection is the most common non-viral STI globally and can result in adverse pregnancy outcomes and exacerbated HIV acquisition/transmission. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are the most sensitive diagnostic tests, with high specificity, but TV NAATs are rarely used in Brazil. We investigated the TV prevalence and compared the performance of the US Food and Drug Association-cleared Aptima TV assay with microscopy (wet mount and Gram-stained) and culture for TV detection in women in Pelotas, Brazil in an observational study.

METHODS: From August 2015 to December 2016, 499 consecutive asymptomatic and symptomatic sexually active women attending a Gynaecology and Obstetrics Outpatient Clinic were enrolled. Vaginal fluid and swab specimens were collected and wet mount microscopy, Gram-stained microscopy, culture and the Aptima TV assay performed.

RESULTS: The median age of enrolled women was 36.5 years (range: 15-77). The majority were white, had a steady sexual partner and low levels of education. The TV detection rate was 4.2%, 2.4%, 1.2% and 0% using the Aptima TV assay, culture, wet mount microscopy and Gram-stained microscopy, respectively. The sensitivity of culture and wet mount microscopy was only 57.1% (95% CI 36.5 to 75.5) and 28.6% (95% CI 13.8 to 50.0), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: was found among women in Pelotas, Brazil and the routine diagnostic test (wet mount microscopy) and culture had low sensitivities. More sensitive diagnostic tests (NAATs) and enhanced testing of symptomatic and asymptomatic at-risk women are crucial to mitigate the transmission of TV infection, TV-associated sequelae and enhanced HIV acquisition and transmission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Aptima, brazil, culture, nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT), trichomonas infection, trichomonas vaginalis, wet mount microscopy
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68678 (URN)10.1136/sextrans-2018-053635 (DOI)30154157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Lee, H., Suh, Y. H., Lee, S., Kim, Y.-K., Han, M.-S., Bae, H. G., . . . Lee, K. (2019). Emergence and Spread of Cephalosporin-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Mosaic penA Alleles, South Korea, 2012-2017. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(3), 416-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emergence and Spread of Cephalosporin-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Mosaic penA Alleles, South Korea, 2012-2017
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 416-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In South Korea, surveillance of antimicrobial drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is extremely limited. We describe the emergence and subsequent national spread of N. gonorrhoeae strains with mosaic penA alleles associated with decreased susceptibility and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. From 2012 through 2017, the proportion of mosaic penA alleles in gonococcal-positive nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) specimens across South Korea increased from 1.1% to 23.9%. Gonococcal strains with mosaic penA alleles emerged in the international hubs of Seoul in Gyeonggi Province and Busan in South Gyeongsang Province and subsequently spread across South Korea. Most common was mosaic penA-10.001 (n = 572 isolates; 94.7%), which is associated with cefixime resistance. We also identified mosaic penA-34.001 and penA-60.001, both of which are associated with multidrug-resistant gonococcal strains and spread of cefixime and ceftriaxone resistance. Implementation of molecular resistance prediction from N. gonorrhoeae-positive nucleic acid amplification test specimens is imperative in South Korea and internationally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019
National Category
Infectious Medicine Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72974 (URN)10.3201/eid2503.181503 (DOI)000459021000003 ()30789143 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061958068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Yéo, A., Kouamé-Blavo, B., Kouamé, C. E., Ouattara, A., Yao, A. C., Gbedé, B. D., . . . Unemo, M. (2019). Establishment of a Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme, in Accordance With World Health Organization Standards, in Côte d'Ivoire, Western Africa, 2014-2017. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 46(3), 179-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishment of a Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme, in Accordance With World Health Organization Standards, in Côte d'Ivoire, Western Africa, 2014-2017
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, ISSN 0148-5717, E-ISSN 1537-4521, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is compromising the treatment of gonorrhea globally. Recent AMR data are extremely limited in Africa, and mainly totally lacking in Western Africa, including Côte d'Ivoire. This study (i) established a quality-assured gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance program, according to World Health Organization quality criteria, (ii) investigated the AMR to 8 therapeutic antimicrobials in gonococcal isolates from 2014 to 2017, and (iii) provided evidence for updating the National Sexually Transmitted Disease Syndromic Management Guidelines in Côte d'Ivoire.

METHODS: During 2014 to 2017, gonococcal isolates were obtained from sexually active symptomatic or asymptomatic males and females in 14 sites in Côte d'Ivoire. It was a special focus on symptomatic males, and their sexual partners, due to the higher culture positivity rates in symptomatic males. Patient metadata were collected, including age, gender, sexual orientation, and symptoms. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 8 antimicrobials were determined by Etest and interpreted using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing breakpoints. β-lactamase production was detected using cefinase disks.

RESULTS: The level of resistance, examining 212 gonococcal isolates, was as follows: 84.9% to tetracycline, 68.9% to benzylpenicillin, 62.7% to ciprofloxacin, 6.1% to azithromycin, and 1.4% to gentamicin. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, cefixime and spectinomycin.

CONCLUSIONS: We provide the first gonococcal AMR data, quality assured according to World Health Organization standards, from Côte d'Ivoire since more than 20 years. The high ciprofloxacin resistance, which informed a revision of the national syndromic management guideline during study, and relatively high resistance to azithromycin demand an improved gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance program and increased awareness when prescribing treatment in Côte d'Ivoire.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72899 (URN)10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000943 (DOI)000459593600010 ()30461598 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061281997 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Institut Pasteur de Cote d'Ivoire, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire  

Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland 

Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Gianecini, R. A., Golparian, D., Zittermann, S., Litvik, A., Gonzalez, S., Oviedo, C., . . . Galarza, P. (2019). Genome-based epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance determinants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with decreased susceptibility and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins in Argentina in 2011-16. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Article ID dkz054.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-based epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance determinants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with decreased susceptibility and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins in Argentina in 2011-16
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, article id dkz054Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to describe the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance determinants of isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with decreased susceptibility and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) in Argentina in 2011-16.

METHODS: Gonococcal isolates (n = 158) with decreased susceptibility and resistance to ESCs collected in 2011-16 across Argentina were subjected to WGS and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for six antimicrobials.

RESULTS: In total, 50% of the isolates were resistant to cefixime, 1.9% were resistant to ceftriaxone, 37.3% were resistant to azithromycin and 63.9% of the isolates showed an MDR phenotype. Resistance and decreased susceptibility to ESCs was mainly associated with isolates possessing the mosaic penA-34.001, in combination with an mtrR promoter A deletion, and PorB1b amino acid substitutions G120K/A121N. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two main clades of circulating strains, which were associated with the N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) ST1407 and closely related STs, and characterized by a high prevalence rate, wide geographical distribution and temporal persistence.

CONCLUSIONS: N. gonorrhoeae isolates with decreased susceptibility and resistance to ESCs in Argentina have emerged and rapidly spread mainly due to two clonal expansions after importation of one or two strains, which are associated with the international MDR NG-MAST ST1407 clone. The identification of the geographical dissemination and characteristics of these predominant clones may help to focus action plans and public health policies to control the spread of ESC resistance in Argentina. Dual antimicrobial therapy (ceftriaxone plus azithromycin) for gonorrhoea needs to be considered in Argentina.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72874 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkz054 (DOI)30820563 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, S., Mason, C., Khan, N., Meo, P. & Unemo, M. (2019). In vitro activity of the novel oral antimicrobial SMT-571, with a new mechanism of action, against MDR and XDR Neisseria gonorrhoeae: future treatment option for gonorrhoea?. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Article ID dkz060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro activity of the novel oral antimicrobial SMT-571, with a new mechanism of action, against MDR and XDR Neisseria gonorrhoeae: future treatment option for gonorrhoea?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, article id dkz060Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Lack of effective treatment of gonorrhoea due to increasing antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a serious threat to the management and control of the infection. Novel antimicrobials are required to prevent the infection becoming untreatable.

OBJECTIVES: Herein, we investigated the in vitro activity of a novel small-molecule antimicrobial with a new mechanism of action, SMT-571, against a large collection of clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 228) and international gonococcal reference strains (n = 34), including numerous MDR and XDR gonococcal isolates.

METHODS: MICs of SMT-571 were determined by agar dilution and MICs of ceftriaxone, cefixime, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, spectinomycin and tetracycline were determined by Etest.

RESULTS: SMT-571 showed potent in vitro activity against all the tested N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 262). The MICs ranged from 0.064 to 0.125 mg/L and the MIC50, MIC90 and modal MIC were all 0.125 mg/L. No cross-resistance or correlation between the MICs of SMT-571 and comparator agents was seen.

CONCLUSIONS: SMT-571 demonstrated potent in vitro activity against all tested gonococcal isolates and no cross-resistance to previously and currently used antimicrobials was seen. With its promising supplementary in vitro and in vivo preclinical data, including high levels of oral bioavailability, SMT-571 could be an effective option for the oral treatment of gonorrhoea. Randomized controlled clinical trials for gonorrhoea that examine the treatment efficacy, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, toxicity and safety of SMT-571, and include urogenital and extragenital (rectal and pharyngeal) samples, are crucial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72787 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkz060 (DOI)30778550 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Connolly, K. L., Eakin, A. E., Gomez, C., Osborn, B. L., Unemo, M. & Jerse, A. E. (2019). Pharmacokinetic Data Are Predictive of In Vivo Efficacy for Cefixime and Ceftriaxone against Susceptible and Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains in the Gonorrhea Mouse Model. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 63(3), Article ID e01644-18.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacokinetic Data Are Predictive of In Vivo Efficacy for Cefixime and Ceftriaxone against Susceptible and Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains in the Gonorrhea Mouse Model
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 63, no 3, article id e01644-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a pressing need for drug development for gonorrhea. Here we describe pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) analysis of extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant gonococcal strains in a murine genital tract infection model. PK determined in uninfected mice displayed a clear dose response in plasma levels following single doses of ceftriaxone (CRO) (intraperitoneal) or cefixime (CFM) (oral). The observed doses required for efficacy against ESCS strain FA1090 were 5 mg/kg (CRO) and 12 mg/kg (CFM); these doses had estimated therapeutic times (time of free drug above the MIC, fTMIC) of 24 h and 37 h, respectively. No single dose of CRO or CFM was effective against the ESCR strain H041. However, fractionation (TIDq8h) of a 120 mg/kg dose of CRO resulted in estimated therapeutic times in the range of 23 h and cleared H041 infection in a majority (90%) of mice, comparable to gentamicin. In contrast, multiple CFM doses of 120 or 300 mg/kg administered TIDq8h cleared infection in ≤ 50% of mice with therapeutic times estimated from single-dose PK data, of 13 and 27 h, respectively. This study reveals a clear relationship between plasma ESC levels and bacterial clearance rates in the gonorrhea mouse model. The PK/PD relationships in mice reflected that observed in humans with in vivo efficacy against an ESCS strain requiring doses that yielded an fTMIC in excess of 20-24 h. PK data also accurately predicted the failure of single doses of ESCs against an ESCR strain and were useful in designing effective dosing regimens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2019
Keywords
antibiotic resistance, cefixime, ceftriaxone, clearance, gonorrhea, mouse model, pharmacokinetics
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71658 (URN)10.1128/AAC.01644-18 (DOI)000459683500006 ()30642924 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062283684 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health  AAI14024 

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS)  AAI14024 

NIAID's suite of preclinical services  HHSN2722011000221

Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Shipitsyna, E., Krysanova, A., Khayrullina, G., Shalepo, K., Savicheva, A., Guschin, A. & Unemo, M. (2019). Quantitation of all Four Gardnerella vaginalis Clades Detects Abnormal Vaginal Microbiota Characteristic of Bacterial Vaginosis More Accurately than Putative G. vaginalis Sialidase A Gene Count. Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy, 23(1), 139-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitation of all Four Gardnerella vaginalis Clades Detects Abnormal Vaginal Microbiota Characteristic of Bacterial Vaginosis More Accurately than Putative G. vaginalis Sialidase A Gene Count
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy, ISSN 1177-1062, E-ISSN 1179-2000, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a vaginal disorder characterized by a depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of mainly anaerobic bacteria.

Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate the distribution and abundance of the Gardnerella vaginalis clades and sialidase A gene in vaginal samples from Russian women, and investigate if the G. vaginalis sialidase A gene count detects an abnormal vaginal microbiota characteristic of BV more accurately than G. vaginalis load.

Methods: Vaginal samples from 299 non-pregnant patients of gynecological clinics were examined using Nugent scores and G. vaginalis clade and sialidase A gene quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Discriminatory power for BV microbiota was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

Results: The vaginal microbiota was characterized by Nugent scores as normal, intermediate, and BV microbiota in 162, 58, and 79 women, respectively. G. vaginalis clades 1, 2, 3, 4, and the sialidase A gene were detected in 56% (51-62%), 40% (34-45%), 20% (16-25%), 94% (91-96%), and 70% (64-75%) of vaginal samples, respectively. The frequency and abundance of clades 1, 2, 4, and the sialidase A gene as well as clade multiplicity were significantly associated with abnormal microbiota. The sialidase A gene was present in all multi-clade samples, in all single-clade samples comprising clades 1, 2, and 3, and in four of 84 (5% [2-12%]) samples comprising clade 4 only. Total G. vaginalis load showed significantly higher discriminatory power for abnormal microbiota than sialidase A gene count (areas under ROC curves 0.933 vs. 0.881; p = 0.0306).

Conclusions: Quantifying all four G. vaginalis clades discriminates between BV microbiota and normal microbiota more accurately than measuring G. vaginalis sialidase A gene. Clade 4 is strongly associated with BV microbiota, despite most clade 4 strains lacking the sialidase A gene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Adis International Ltd., 2019
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72980 (URN)10.1007/s40291-019-00382-5 (DOI)000459218900010 ()30721449 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

D.O. Ott Research Institute of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductology, St Petersburg, Russia  

Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russia 

Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
El-Rami, F. E., Zielke, R. A., Wi, T., Sikora, A. E. & Unemo, M. (2019). Quantitative proteomics of the 2016 WHO Neisseria gonorrhoeae reference strains surveys vaccine candidates and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 18(1), 127-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative proteomics of the 2016 WHO Neisseria gonorrhoeae reference strains surveys vaccine candidates and antimicrobial resistance determinants
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 127-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea (causative agent: Neisseria gonorrhoeae) remains an urgent public health threat globally due to its reproductive health repercussions, high incidence, widespread antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and absence of a vaccine. To mine gonorrhea antigens and enhance our understanding of gonococcal AMR at the proteome level, we performed the first large-scale proteomic profiling of a diverse panel (n=15) of gonococcal strains, including the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) reference strains. These strains show all existing AMR profiles - established through phenotypic characterization and reference genome publication - and are intended for quality assurance in laboratory investigations. Herein, these isolates were subjected to subcellular fractionation and labeling with tandem mass tags coupled to mass spectrometry and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics. Our analyses detected 904 and 723 common proteins in cell envelope and cytoplasmic subproteomes, respectively. We identified nine novel gonorrhea vaccine candidates. Expression and conservation of new and previously selected antigens were investigated. In addition, established gonococcal AMR determinants were evaluated for the first time using quantitative proteomics. Six new proteins, WHO_F_00238, WHO_F_00635c, WHO_F_00745, WHO_F_01139, WHO_F_01144c, and WHO_F_01126, were differentially expressed in all strains, suggesting that they represent global proteomic AMR markers, indicate a predisposition toward developing or compensating gonococcal AMR, and/or act as new antimicrobial targets. Finally, phenotypic clustering based on the isolates' defined antibiograms and common differentially expressed proteins yielded seven matching clusters between established and proteome-derived AMR signatures. Together, our investigations provide a reference proteomics databank for gonococcal vaccine and AMR research endeavors, which enables microbiological, clinical, or epidemiological projects and enhances the utility of the WHO reference strains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2019
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69896 (URN)10.1074/mcp.RA118.001125 (DOI)000454764200012 ()30352803 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057604568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Woodhall, S. C., Gorwitz, R. J., Migchelsen, S. J., Gottlieb, S. L., Horner, P. J., Geisler, W. M., . . . Bernstein, K. (2018). Advancing the public health applications of Chlamydia trachomatis serology. Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), 18(12), E399-E407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advancing the public health applications of Chlamydia trachomatis serology
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), ISSN 1473-3099, E-ISSN 1474-4457, Vol. 18, no 12, p. E399-E407Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection. Trachoma is caused by ocular infection with C trachomatis and is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. New serological assays for C trachomatis could facilitate improved understanding of C trachomatis epidemiology and prevention. C trachomatis serology offers a means of investigating the incidence of chlamydia infection and might be developed as a biomarker of scarring sequelae, such as pelvic inflammatory disease. Therefore, serological assays have potential as epidemiological tools to quantify unmet need, inform service planning, evaluate interventions including screening and treatment, and to assess new vaccine candidates. However, questions about the performance characteristics and interpretation of C trachomatis serological assays remain, which must be addressed to advance development within this field. In this Personal View, we explore the available information about C trachomatis serology and propose several priority actions. These actions involve development of target product profiles to guide assay selection and assessment across multiple applications and populations, establishment of a serum bank to facilitate assay development and evaluation, and development of technical and statistical methods for assay evaluation and analysis of serological findings. The field of C trachomatis serology will benefit from collaboration across the public health community to align technological developments with their potential applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Infectious Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68365 (URN)10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30159-2 (DOI)000450899900004 ()29983342 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Public Health England  

National Institute of Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Evaluation of Interventions at the University of Bristol  

NIHR HPRU in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London 

Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, B., Malejczyk, M., Majewski, S. & Unemo, M. (2018). Antibiotic resistance and NG-MAST sequence types of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in Poland compared to the world. Advances in Dermatology and Allergology / Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii, 35(6), 546-551
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic resistance and NG-MAST sequence types of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in Poland compared to the world
2018 (English)In: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology / Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii, ISSN 1642-395X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 546-551Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gonorrhoea is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and in 2012, the World Health Organization estimated about 78 million of new global urogenital cases among adults per year. The main concern during the latest decade has been the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Resistance has emerged internationally to the extended-spectrum cephalosporins, ceftriaxone and cefixime, which are the last remaining options for empiric first-line monotherapy of gonorrhoea. In Poland, the levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, benzylpenicillin and tetracycline are high, and the prevalence of azithromycin resistance has increased. However, no resistance to ceftriaxone has been identified. The currently spread multidrug-resistant strains frequently represent epidemic clones. The present paper reviews and describes the antimicrobial resistance and N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) sequence types of N. gonorrhoeae strains spreading in Poland compared to the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Termedia Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Neisseria gonorrhoeae, gonorrhoea, antimicrobial resistance, ceftriaxone, azithromycin, NG-MAST, sequence type, genogroup
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71168 (URN)10.5114/ada.2018.79780 (DOI)000453022600002 ()2-s2.0-85058817744 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1710-2081

Search in DiVA

Show all publications