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Schnürer, Johan
Publications (10 of 110) Show all publications
Leong, S.-l. L., Lantz, H., Pettersson, O. V., Frisvad, J. C., Thrane, U., Heipieper, H. J., . . . Schnürer, J. (2015). Genome and physiology of the ascomycete filamentous fungus Xeromyces bisporus, the most xerophilic organism isolated to date. Environmental Microbiology, 17(2), 496-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome and physiology of the ascomycete filamentous fungus Xeromyces bisporus, the most xerophilic organism isolated to date
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2015 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 496-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Xeromyces bisporus can grow on sugary substrates down to 0.61, an extremely low water activity. Its genome size is approximately 22Mb. Gene clusters encoding for secondary metabolites were conspicuously absent; secondary metabolites were not detected experimentally. Thus, in its dry' but nutrient-rich environment, X.bisporus appears to have relinquished abilities for combative interactions. Elements to sense/signal osmotic stress, e.g. HogA pathway, were present in X.bisporus. However, transcriptomes at optimal (approximate to 0.89) versus low a(w) (0.68) revealed differential expression of only a few stress-related genes; among these, certain (not all) steps for glycerol synthesis were upregulated. Xeromyces bisporus increased glycerol production during hypo- and hyper-osmotic stress, and much of its wet weight comprised water and rinsable solutes; leaked solutes may form a protective slime. Xeromyces bisporus and other food-borne moulds increased membrane fatty acid saturation as water activity decreased. Such modifications did not appear to be transcriptionally regulated in X.bisporus; however, genes modulating sterols, phospholipids and the cell wall were differentially expressed. Xeromyces bisporus was previously proposed to be a chaophile', preferring solutes that disorder biomolecular structures. Both X.bisporus and the closely related xerophile, Xerochrysium xerophilum, with low membrane unsaturation indices, could represent a phylogenetic cluster of chaophiles'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52197 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.12596 (DOI)000350546200016 ()25142400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84923646778 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Research Council Formas 

Carl Tryggers Foundation for Scientific Research 

Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation 

Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing 

Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Daniel, H.-M., Redhead, S. A., Schnürer, J., Naumov, G. I. & Kurtzman, C. P. (2012). (2049-2050) Proposals to conserve the name Wickerhamomyces against Hansenula and to reject the name Saccharomyces sphaericus (Ascomycota: Saccharomycotina): Saccharomycotina). Taxon, 61(2), 459-461
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(2049-2050) Proposals to conserve the name Wickerhamomyces against Hansenula and to reject the name Saccharomyces sphaericus (Ascomycota: Saccharomycotina): Saccharomycotina)
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2012 (English)In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 459-461Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bratislava, Slovakia: International Association for Plant Taxonomy, 2012
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52198 (URN)000309082900001 ()2-s2.0-84859870771 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Olstorpe, M., Schnürer, J. & Passoth, V. (2012). Growth Inhibition of Various Enterobacteriaceae Species by the Yeast Hansenula anomala during Storage of Moist Cereal Grain. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 78(1), 292-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth Inhibition of Various Enterobacteriaceae Species by the Yeast Hansenula anomala during Storage of Moist Cereal Grain
2012 (English)In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 292-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eleven of 13 Enterobacteriaceae species tested grew in moist stored wheat, highlighting a potential risk of this energy-saving airtight storage method. When Hansenula anomala was coinoculated, all Enterobacteriaceae species were significantly inhibited after 2 months of storage, six of them to below the detection limit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, USA: American Society for Microbiology, 2012
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52200 (URN)10.1128/AEM.06024-11 (DOI)000298396700040 ()22020520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84855676789 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Faculty for Natural Resources and Agriculture at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences 

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Båth, K., Persson, K. N., Schnürer, J. & Leong, S.-l. L. (2012). Microbiota of an unpasteurised cellar-stored goat cheese from northern Sweden. Agricultural and Food Science, 21(2), 197-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbiota of an unpasteurised cellar-stored goat cheese from northern Sweden
2012 (English)In: Agricultural and Food Science, ISSN 1459-6067, E-ISSN 1795-1895, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study reports on lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts and moulds isolated from three artisanal Swedish cellar-stored goat cheeses aged for 1, 3 and 5 months. Starter culture LAB dominated in the younger cheeses, and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, common in raw goats' milk, had persisted from the unpasteurised milk into all the cheeses. Non-starter LAB dominated in the 5 month cheese, in particular, Lactobacillus sakei, a meat-associated LAB not previously isolated from cheese. Debaryomyces hansenii, and Penicillium and Mucor species were dominant among the yeasts and moulds, respectively. The cheese rind was not formed primarily from Penicillium species as in traditional cheeses such as Camembert - rather, mycelium from Mucor mucedo contributed to rind formation. Mould species known to produce sterigmatocystin, aflatoxins or ochratoxin A in cheese were not isolated in this study; growth of mycotoxigenic Aspergilli may have been inhibited by the cool conditions in the earth-cellar (4-6 degrees C).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki, Finland: M T T / Agrifood Research Finland, 2012
Keywords
Maturation, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, moulds
National Category
Food Science Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52199 (URN)000304917300010 ()2-s2.0-84870547227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-21 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Wuczkowski, M., Passoth, V., Turchetti, B., Andersson, A.-C., Olstorpe, M., Laitila, A., . . . Libkind, D. (2011). Description of Holtermanniella gen. nov., including Holtermanniella takashimae sp. nov. and four new combinations, and proposal of the order Holtermanniales to accommodate tremellomycetous yeasts of the Holtermannia clade. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 61, 680-689
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Description of Holtermanniella gen. nov., including Holtermanniella takashimae sp. nov. and four new combinations, and proposal of the order Holtermanniales to accommodate tremellomycetous yeasts of the Holtermannia clade
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, ISSN 1466-5026, E-ISSN 1466-5034, Vol. 61, p. 680-689Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The novel genus Holtermanniella is proposed here to accommodate four Cryptococcus species closely related to Holtermannia corniformis that are included in the Holtermannia clade (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycotina). Thus, four novel combinations are proposed: Holtermanniella nyarrowii comb. nov., Holtermanniella festucosa comb. nov., Holtermanniella mycelialis comb. nov. and Holtermanniella wattica comb. nov. In addition, a novel anamorphic yeast species was studied with 15 isolates obtained from different habitats around the world. Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 region of their large subunit rDNA showed that the novel species is placed phylogenetically within the Holtermannia clade of the Tremellomycetes (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota). PCR fingerprinting and sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 showed genetic intraspecific variability among the strains: three groups were formed, which did not correlate with geographical origin or substrate. This novel species, designated the type species of Holtermanniella gen. nov., is described as Holtermanniella takashimae sp. nov.; the type strain is CBS 11174(T) (=HB 982(T) =DBVPG 8012(T)). The order Holtermanniales ord. nov. is proposed here to include Holtermannia (the type genus) and Holtermanniella.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: The Microbiology Society, 2011
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52203 (URN)10.1099/ijs.0.019737-0 (DOI)000288923000035 ()20382789 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79952383633 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Universidad Nacional del Comahue 

MIUR 

Finnish Malting and Brewing Industry 

thematic research program MicroDrivE (Microbially Derived Energy) 

Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS)

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, J., South, E., Tiukova, L., Momeni, M. H., Hansson, H., Ståhlberg, J., . . . Passoth, V. (2011). Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate by the alternative industrial ethanol yeast Dekkera bruxellensis. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 53(1), 73-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate by the alternative industrial ethanol yeast Dekkera bruxellensis
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2011 (English)In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0266-8254, E-ISSN 1472-765X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 73-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Testing the ability of the alternative ethanol production yeast Dekkera bruxellensis to produce ethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysate and comparing it to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Methods and Results: Industrial isolates of D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae were cultivated in small-scale batch fermentations of enzymatically hydrolysed steam exploded aspen sawdust. Different dilutions of hydrolysate were tested. None of the yeasts grew in undiluted or 1 : 2 diluted hydrolysate [final glucose concentration always adjusted to 40 g l(-1) (0.22 mol l(-1))]. This was most likely due to the presence of inhibitors such as acetate or furfural. In 1 : 5 hydrolysate, S. cerevisiae grew, but not D. bruxellensis, and in 1 : 10 hydrolysate, both yeasts grew. An external vitamin source (e.g. yeast extract) was essential for growth of D. bruxellensis in this lignocellulosic hydrolysate and strongly stimulated S. cerevisiae growth and ethanol production. Ethanol yields of 0 42 +/- 0 01 g ethanol (g glucose)(-1) were observed for both yeasts in 1 : 10 hydrolysate. In small-scale continuous cultures with cell recirculation, with a gradual increase in the hydrolysate concentration, D. bruxellensis was able to grow in 1 : 5 hydrolysate. In bioreactor experiments with cell recirculation, hydrolysate contents were increased up to 1 : 2 hydrolysate, without significant losses in ethanol yields for both yeasts and only slight differences in viable cell counts, indicating an ability of both yeasts to adapt to toxic compounds in the hydrolysate.

Conclusions: Dekkera bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae have a similar potential to ferment lignocellulose hydrolysate to ethanol and to adapt to fermentation inhibitors in the hydrolysate.

Significance and Impact of the study: This is the first study investigating the potential of D. bruxellensis to ferment lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Its high competitiveness in industrial fermentations makes D. bruxellensis an interesting alternative for ethanol production from those substrates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
Keywords
Aspen sawdust, Dekkera bruxellensis, Lignocellulosic hydrolysate, Saccharomyces cerevisiae
National Category
Biocatalysis and Enzyme Technology Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52202 (URN)10.1111/j.1472-765X.2011.03067.x (DOI)000292560700011 ()21535044 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79958770656 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

MicroDrivE 

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Melin, P., Schnürer, J. & Hakansson, S. (2011). Formulation and stabilisation of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, 99(1), 107-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formulation and stabilisation of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala
2011 (English)In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The yeast Pichia anomala has antifungal activities and its potential in biocontrol and biopreservation has previously been demonstrated. To practically use an organism in such applications on a larger scale the microbe has to be formulated and stabilised. In this review we give an overview of our experience of formulating and stabilising P. anomala strain J121 in a wider perspective. The stabilisation techniques we have evaluated were liquid formulations, fluidised bed drying, lyophilisation (freeze-drying) and vacuum drying. With all methods tested it was possible to obtain yeast cells with shelf lives of at least a few months and in all cases the biocontrol activity was retained. Fluidised bed drying was dependent on the addition of cottonseed flour as a carrier during the drying process. In liquid formulations a sugar, preferentially trehalose, was a required additive. These two kinds of microbial stabilisation are easily performed and relatively inexpensive but in order to keep the cells viable the biomaterial has to be stored at cool temperatures. However, there is room for optimization, such as improving the growth conditions, or include preconditioning steps to enable the cells to produce more compatible solutes necessary to survive formulation, desiccation and storage. In contrast, lyophilisation and vacuum drying require a lot of energy and are thus expensive. On the other hand, the dried cells were mostly intact after one year of storage at 30A degrees C. Inevitably, the choice of formulation and stabilisation techniques will be dependent also on the intended use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer Netherlands, 2011
Keywords
Formulation, Freeze-drying, Fluidised bed drying, Vacuum drying, Biopreservation
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52206 (URN)10.1007/s10482-010-9522-5 (DOI)000286463200013 ()20981571 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research-MISTRA, Sweden 

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Passoth, V., Olstorpe, M. & Schnürer, J. (2011). Past, present and future research directions with Pichia anomala. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, 99(1), 121-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Past, present and future research directions with Pichia anomala
2011 (English)In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 121-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The first International Pichia anomala Symposium provided a survey of past, recent and ongoing research on this yeast. The research community working with this yeast has focussed on several areas. Based on molecular data, a revision of the taxonomy is required: the name P. anomala is no longer applicable, as the genus Pichia is polyphyletic. The current debate centres on whether the yeast should be designated as Wickerhamomyces anomalus or if the previous name, Hansenula anomala, should be re-instated. The anti-microbial activities of this yeast received considerable attention during the symposium. H. anomala has been extensively studied as a biopreservation agent in many different post-harvest systems. Several mechanisms account for its anti-microbial activities, including the production of killer proteins and toxic volatile metabolites. Anti-idiotypic antibodies generating an "internal image" of a killer protein have been found to possess therapeutic activity against a broad range of microorganisms. A great diversity of H. anomala strains was reported at the symposium. Strains have been isolated from several food and feed systems and even from the intestine and reproductive organs of a malaria vector (Anopheles stephensi). Feed and food supplemented with certain H. anomala strains show an improved quality due, for example, to the addition of advantageous proteins and phytase activity. However, a number of apparent opportunistic pathogenic strains have also been isolated. Strain differentiation, especially the recognition of potentially pathogenic isolates, is an important challenge for the future commercialisation of this yeast. Future industrial and agricultural application of this yeast also raises questions of the economics of large-scale production, its survival during storage (formulation) and of safety regulations, all of which require further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, 2011
Keywords
Pichia anomala, Hansenula, Wickerhamomyces, Killer protein, Biocontrol, Phytase, Ethyl acetate, Opportunistic pathogen
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52274 (URN)10.1007/s10482-010-9508-3 (DOI)000286463200015 ()20924674 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79451471304 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-09-16 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, O. V., Leong, S.-l. L., Lantz, H., Rice, T., Dijksterhuis, J., Houbraken, J., . . . Schnürer, J. (2011). Phylogeny and intraspecific variation of the extreme xerophile, Xeromyces bisporus. Fungal Biology, 115(11), 1100-1111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogeny and intraspecific variation of the extreme xerophile, Xeromyces bisporus
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2011 (English)In: Fungal Biology, ISSN 1878-6146, E-ISSN 1878-6162, Vol. 115, no 11, p. 1100-1111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The filamentous ascomycete Xeromyces bisporus is an extreme xerophile able to grow down to a water activity of 0.62. We have inferred the phylogenetic position of Xeromyces in relation to other xerophilic and xerotolerant fungi in the order Eurotiales. Using nrDNA and betatubulin sequences, we show that it is more closely related to the xerophilic food-borne species of the genus Chrysosporium, than to the genus Monascus. The taxonomy of X. bisporus and Monascus is discussed. Based on physiological, morphological, and phylogenetic distinctiveness, we suggest that Xeromyces should be retained as a separate genus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Chrysosporium, Eurotiales, Fungi, Monascus, Phylogeny, Xeromyces bisporus, Xerophile
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52201 (URN)10.1016/j.funbio.2011.06.012 (DOI)000297873100002 ()22036289 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80955158588 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Faculty of Science and Agriculture 

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Carl-Tryggers Foundation

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Schnürer, J. & Jonsson, A. (2011). Pichia anomala J121: a 30-year overnight near success biopreservation story. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, 99(1), 5-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pichia anomala J121: a 30-year overnight near success biopreservation story
2011 (English)In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 5-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thirty years ago, the ascomycetous yeast Pichia anomala strain J121 was isolated from moist wheat grain stored under conditions of restricted air access. Early observations indicated that an inverse relationship existed between mould and P. anomala colony forming units in grain. This yeast strain was later found to have strong antifungal properties in laboratory, pilot and farm studies with high-moisture wheat under malfunctioning airtight storage. P. anomala had the highest inhibitory activity of 60 yeast species evaluated against the mould Penicillium roqueforti. It also demonstrated strong inhibitory effects against certain Gram-negative bacteria. P. anomala J121 possesses a number of physiological characteristics, i.e. capacity to grow under low pH, low water activity and low oxygen tension and ability to use a wide range of carbon and nitrogen sources, enabling it to act as an efficient biopreservative agent. The biocontrol effect in grain was enhanced by addition of glucose, mainly through formation of the volatile antimicrobial ethyl acetate. Animal feeding trials with P. anomala J121 inoculated grains, fed to chickens and beef cattle, demonstrated that mould control observed in vitro in small scale laboratory experiments could be extended to large scale farm trials. In addition, no adverse effects on animal weight gain, feed conversion, health or behaviour were observed. We have now studied P. anomala J121 biology, ecology and grain preservation ability for 30 years. Over this period, more than 40 scientific publications and five PhD theses have been written on different aspects of this yeast strain, extending from fundamental research on metabolism, genetics and molecular biology, all the way to practical farm-scale level. In spite of the well documented biopreservative ability of the yeast, it has to date been very difficult to create the right constellation of technical, agricultural and biotechnical industries necessary to reach a commercial launch of a P. anomala J121 based biopreservation system. Additionally, the complications caused by a complex EU regulatory system remain a significant barrier to practical applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer Netherlands, 2011
Keywords
Pichia anomala, Hansenula, Wickerhamomyces, Application, Feed trials, Grain storage
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52205 (URN)10.1007/s10482-010-9509-2 (DOI)000286463200002 ()20872178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79451475561 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

MISTRA (The Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research) 

FORMAS (The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planing)

SLF (The Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agricultural Research) 

European Union 

Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences 

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

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