oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Lundqvist, Lars-OlovORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6703-7575
Publications (10 of 78) Show all publications
Jarl, G. & Lundqvist, L.-O. (2020). An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model. Assistive technology, 32(1), 47-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model
2020 (English)In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The medical and social models of disability are based on a dichotomy that categorizes people as able-bodied or disabled. In contrast, the biopsychosocial model, which forms the basis for the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), suggests a universalistic perspective on human functioning, encompassing all human beings. In this article we argue that the artificial separation of function-enhancing technology into assistive technology (AT) and mainstream technology might be one of the barriers to a universalistic view of human functioning. Thus, an alternative view of AT is needed. The aim of this article was to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate how all human activities and participation depend on factors related to the person, environment, and tools, emphasizing a universalistic perspective on human functioning. In the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model, a person's activity and participation are described as a function of factors related to the person, environment, and tool, drawing on various ICF components. Importantly, the PET model makes no distinction between people of different ability levels, between environmental modifications intended for people of different ability levels, or between different function-enhancing technologies (AT and mainstream technology). A fictive patient case is used to illustrate how the universalistic view of the PET model lead to a different approach in rehabilitation. The PET model supports a universalistic view of technology use, environmental adaptations, and variations in human functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
activities of daily living, environmental modifications, universal design
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66705 (URN)10.1080/10400435.2018.1467514 (DOI)000506052500007 ()29676966 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065504570 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Region Örebro County

Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, L.-O., Suryani, -., Hermiati, D., Sutini, T. & Schröder, A. (2019). A psychometric evaluation of the Indonesian version of the Quality in Psychiatric Care-Inpatient Staff (QPC-IPS) instrument. Asian Journal of Psychiatry, 46, 29-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A psychometric evaluation of the Indonesian version of the Quality in Psychiatric Care-Inpatient Staff (QPC-IPS) instrument
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 46, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Indonesian version of the Quality of Psychiatric Care - Inpatient Staff (QPC-IPS) instrument.

METHODS: A sample of 192 permanently employed members of staff at two general psychiatric wards in Indonesia completed the QPC-IPS, which consists of 30 items covering six dimensions of quality.

RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the factor structure of the Indonesian version was equivalent to that proposed from the original Swedish QPC-IPS. Internal consistency for the full QPC-IPS was adequate, but poor for some of the factors. The results thus demonstrate that the concept of quality of care expressed in the QPC-IPS is to a large extent equivalent among staff in fundamentally different health care systems and cultural contexts.

CONCLUSION: The Indonesian QPC-IPS is a useful instrument for evaluating staff perception of psychiatric inpatient care in Indonesia, and thus contributes to health care improvement in the field of psychiatry. The QPC-IPS can be used together with the Quality of Psychiatric Care- In-Patient (QPC-IP) instrument, which is completed by the inpatients themselves, to improve the quality of psychiatric inpatient care and national as well as international benchmarking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Confirmatory factor analysis, Cross-cultural adaptation, Inpatient psychiatric care, Psychometric properties, Quality of care, Questionnaire
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78566 (URN)10.1016/j.ajp.2019.09.027 (DOI)000499674100011 ()31590006 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072793183 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Region Örebro County 

Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Alnemo, J., Tranberg, R., Lundqvist, L.-O. & Jarl, G. (2019). Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?. In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book. Paper presented at 8th Internationel Conference of the Diabetic foot, Haag, Netherlands, 22-25 May, 2019 (pp. 140-140). , Article ID P45.04.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?
2019 (English)In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, p. 140-140, article id P45.04Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: There is some debate about laterality for diabetic foot complications, that is, whether the right and left limbs are unequally affected. Coxon and Gallen (1) found that more amputations were performed on the right limb and Evans et al. (2) interpreted this in the context of foot dominance: they found that most foot ulcers occured on the dominant limb (which for most people is the right one) and speculated that the dominant limb may be more exposed to mechanical stresses and injuries. However, Demetriou et al. (3) did not find any laterality in foot ulcer location. The aim was to investigate laterality for foot ulcers and amputations. Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1245 people who had diabetes, experience of using therapeutic shoes, and who had attended one of two prosthetics and orthotics clinics during a 12 months’ period. The number of ulcers or amputations on the right and left limb were compared with a two-sided chi-square test. Results: 469 (37.7%) questionnaires were returned. 118 (25.2%) participants reported unilateral foot ulcers, 54 (11.5%) reported unilateral minor amputation, and 21 (4.5%) reported unilateral major amputation. There was no statistically significant right-left difference in foot ulcers, minor amputations or major amputations (Table 1, p-values 0.713-1.000). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis about laterality for foot ulcers and amputations.

National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77196 (URN)
Conference
8th Internationel Conference of the Diabetic foot, Haag, Netherlands, 22-25 May, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Alnemo, J., Tranberg, R., Lundqvist, L.-O. & Jarl, G. (2019). Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?. In: : . Paper presented at EWMA 2019 - European Wound Management Association, Gothenburg, Sweden, 5-7 June, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77486 (URN)
Conference
EWMA 2019 - European Wound Management Association, Gothenburg, Sweden, 5-7 June, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Alnemo, J., Lundqvist, L.-O., Tranberg, R. & Jarl, G. (2019). Attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications. In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Absttaract book. Paper presented at 8th International conference ot the Diabetic Foot, Hague, Netherlands, May 22-25, 2019 (pp. 117-117). , Article ID P35.05.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications
2019 (English)In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Absttaract book, 2019, p. 117-117, article id P35.05Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2 years) were analyzed. More men than women (p < 0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions

National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77212 (URN)
Conference
8th International conference ot the Diabetic Foot, Hague, Netherlands, May 22-25, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Jarl, G., Alnemo, J., Tranberg, R. & Lundqvist, L.-O. (2019). Gender differences in attitudes and attributes of people using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 12, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in attitudes and attributes of people using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications
2019 (English)In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, ISSN 1757-1146, Vol. 12, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2years) were analyzed. More men than women (p<0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Diabetes mellitus, Diabetic foot, Diabetes complications, Shoes, Patient compliance, Treatment adherence and compliance
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73768 (URN)10.1186/s13047-019-0327-0 (DOI)000463602200001 ()30976327 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Region Örebro County, Sweden 

Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Selvin, M., Almqvist, K., Kjellin, L., Lundqvist, L.-O. & Schröder, A. (2019). Patient and staff experiences of quality in Swedish forensic psychiatric care: a repeated cross-sectional survey with yearly sampling at two clinics. International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 13, Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient and staff experiences of quality in Swedish forensic psychiatric care: a repeated cross-sectional survey with yearly sampling at two clinics
Show others...
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems, ISSN 1752-4458, E-ISSN 1752-4458, Vol. 13, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Systematic efforts to improve the quality, safety and value of health care have increased over the last decades. Even so, it is hard to choose priorities and to know when the desired results are reached, especially in forensic psychiatric care where there can be a discrepancy between patient and staff expectations of what good quality of care is and how it should be reached. The aim of the present study was to describe and compare patient and staff experiences of quality of care in two forensic psychiatric clinics over a period of 4years.

Methods: A quantitative design was used and yearly between 2011 and 2014, a total of 105 questionnaires were answered by patients and 598 by staff.

Results: The sample consisted of four different groups; patient and staff in Clinic A and Clinic B respectively. The repeated measurements showed that quality of care, as described by the patients, varied over time, with significant changes over the 4years. The staff evaluations of the quality of care were more stable over time in both clinics compared with the patients. Generally, the staff rated the quality as being better than the patients but these differences tended to decrease when efforts were made to improve the care.

Conclusions: It is important to highlight both what staff and patients perceive as both high and low quality care. With regular measurements and sufficient resources, training, support and leadership, the chances of successful improvement work increase. This knowledge is important in forensic nursing practice, for teaching and for management and decision makers in the constant work of improving forensic psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Forensic psychiatry, Forensic nursing, Quality improvement
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72424 (URN)10.1186/s13033-019-0265-z (DOI)000457489600001 ()30733827 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061003262 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Brunt, D., Schröder, A., Lundqvist, L.-O. & Rask, M. (2019). Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 40(8), 697-705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities
2019 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Occupational Therapy Psychiatry Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74313 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2019.1585496 (DOI)000478574200008 ()31099719 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066105299 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Matérne, M., Strandberg, T. & Lundqvist, L.-O. (2019). Risk Markers for Not Returning to Work Among Patients with Acquired Brain Injury: A Population-Based Register Study. Journal of occupational rehabilitation, 29(4), 728-739
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Markers for Not Returning to Work Among Patients with Acquired Brain Injury: A Population-Based Register Study
2019 (English)In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 728-739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate person-related, injury-related, activity-related and rehabilitation-related risk markers for not return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Methods: Retrospective data from the Quality register, WebRehab Sweden, on an ABI cohort of 2008 patients, was divided into two groups: those who had returned to work (n = 690) and those who had not returned to work (n = 1318) within a year of the injury.

Results: Risk ratio analyses showed that several factors were risk markers for not returning to work: personal factors, including being a woman, being born outside of Sweden, having a low education level, and not having children in the household; injury-related factors, including long hospital stay (over 2 months), aphasia, low motor function, low cognitive function, high pain/discomfort, and high anxiety/depression; activity-related factors, including low function in self-care, inability to perform usual activities, and not having a driver's license; and rehabilitation-related factors, including being dissatisfied with the rehabilitation process and the attentiveness of the staff having limited influence over the rehabilitation plan, or not having a rehabilitation plan at all. Conclusion Several factors in different aspects of life were risk markers for not returning to work among patients with ABI. This suggests that rehabilitation and interventions need to address not only direct injury-related issues, but also person-related, activity-related, and rehabilitation-related factors in order to increase the patient's opportunities to return to work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Brain Injuries, Employment, Registries, Rehabilitation, vocational, Return to work
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73202 (URN)10.1007/s10926-019-09833-6 (DOI)000495099300008 ()30830502 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062704247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, L.-O., Matérne, M. & Strandberg, T. (2019). Risk markers for not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury. In: : . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Social Work in Health and Mental Health: Shaping the future. Promoting human rights and social perspectives in health and mental health, York, UK, July 22-26, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk markers for not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Research shows that variety of factors are related to risks of not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury (ABI). In Sweden, 40% of those with ABI in working age return to work within two years after the injury, which in line with international findings. However, since countries may differ in work rehabilitation, social security systems, culture and laws, different factors may influence the possibilities of returning to work across countries.

AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate person, injury, activity and rehabilitation related risk markers for not return to work among persons with ABI in Sweden.

METHODS: Retrospective data of an ABI cohort of 2008 people from the WebRehab Sweden quality register were used.

RESULTS: Analyses showed that the risk ratio for not returning to work was larger for people that, among the Personal factors, were woman, born outside of Sweden, had low education level, and not having children in the household; among the injury related factors, had long (> 2 months) hospital stay, aphasia, low motor function, low cognitive function, high pain/discomfort, and high anxiety/depression; among the activity related factors, had low function in self-care, inability to perform usual activities, and had their driver´s license suspended; and finally among the rehabilitation related factors, were satisfied with treatment and having influence over their rehabilitation plan.

DISCUSSION / CONCLUSION: Several factors in different areas were risk markers for not returning to work among people with ABI. This suggest that work rehabilitation and interventions, in addition to direct injury related issues, need to address personal related, activity related and rehabilitation related factors in order to increase the patient´s possibility to return to work. Influences of general and country specific factors on returning to work among people with ABI will be discussed.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78642 (URN)
Conference
9th International Conference on Social Work in Health and Mental Health: Shaping the future. Promoting human rights and social perspectives in health and mental health, York, UK, July 22-26, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6703-7575

Search in DiVA

Show all publications