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Sjöberg, S., Callac, N., Allard, B., Smittenberg, R. H. & Dupraz, C. (2018). Microbial Communities Inhabiting a Rare Earth Element Enriched Birnessite-Type Manganese Deposit in the Ytterby Mine, Sweden. Geomicrobiology Journal, 35(8), 657-674
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial Communities Inhabiting a Rare Earth Element Enriched Birnessite-Type Manganese Deposit in the Ytterby Mine, Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Geomicrobiology Journal, ISSN 0149-0451, E-ISSN 1521-0529, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 657-674Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dominant initial phase formed during microbially mediated manganese oxidation is a poorly crystalline birnessite-type phyllomanganate. The occurrence of manganese deposits containing this mineral is of interest for increased understanding of microbial involvement in the manganese cycle. A culture independent molecular approach is used as a first step to investigate the role of microorganisms in forming rare earth element enriched birnessite-type manganese oxides, associated with water bearing rock fractures in a tunnel of the Ytterby mine, Sweden. 16S rRNA gene results show that the chemotrophic bacterial communities are diverse and include a high percentage of uncultured unclassified bacteria while archaeal diversity is low with Thaumarchaeota almost exclusively dominating the population. Ytterby clones are frequently most similar to clones isolated from subsurface environments, low temperature milieus and/or settings rich in metals. Overall, bacteria are dominant compared to archaea. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances are up to four orders of magnitude higher in manganese samples than in fracture water. Potential players in the manganese cycling are mainly found within the ferromanganese genera Hyphomicrobium and Pedomicrobium, and a group of Bacteroidetes sequences that cluster within an uncultured novel genus most closely related to the Terrimonas. This study strongly suggest that the production of the YBS deposit is microbially mediated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Birnessite, microbial diversity, manganese oxidizing bacteria, organomineralization, subsurface microbiology
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68158 (URN)10.1080/01490451.2018.1444690 (DOI)000437337500003 ()2-s2.0-85044755213 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

European Research Council  336092

Available from: 2018-07-26 Created: 2018-07-26 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Sjöberg, V. & Allard, B. (2017). Metal transport dynamics in a small watershed - Dylta bruk, Sweden. In: Bio-geo interactions: basic knowledge to application: 16th Symposium on remediation in Jena “Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium”. Conference proceedings. Paper presented at 16th Symposium on remediation, Jena, Germany, October 5-6, 2017 (pp. 23-23).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal transport dynamics in a small watershed - Dylta bruk, Sweden
2017 (English)In: Bio-geo interactions: basic knowledge to application: 16th Symposium on remediation in Jena “Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium”. Conference proceedings, 2017, p. 23-23Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Metal transport in small streams in boreal catchments is a function of weathering rate, water balance and redistribution mechanisms. Because of these highly dynamic processes long term water quality changes are difficult to determine but needed in order to assess the impact of several local and largescale changes on local water quality.

The field site is situated at Dyltabruk, some 20 km North of Örebro in South Central Sweden. The 4 km2 catchment has deciduous and coniferous species on a granitic moraine with some 20% ofmires and fens adjacent to the oldest sulphur mine in Sweden. Grab samples were collected weekly since 2006 but more frequent during periods with large changes in water balance. The samples were analysed for general hydrochemical parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), inorganic carbon (IC), fulvic and humic acids and dissolved oxygen), dissolved principal anions, principal and trace metals. Standardized analytical procedures were applied. Temperature, precipitation and other climatic parameters were recorded some 2 km from thesite every 15 minutes.

The results showed a general concentration pattern where the water balance had the largest single influence. The concentrations had a seasonality inversely related to the ground water level. Inter annual variations of one to two orders of magnitude were observed for group 1 and 2 elements. For transition metals with high affinity to solid matter as well as DOC the variation reached three to four orders of magnitude. Only aluminium and iron had concentrations that occasionally exceeded solubility limits which resulted in a similar inter annual variation.

During the study period the average annual temperature and precipitation were no different (p 0.05) from the previous ten years but rainfall intensities increased. In a long term perspective the concentrations for all metals except calcium had positive trends. The tendencies remained when normalizing against chloride. The same was found for DOC, nitrate and sulphate. Hence, there is an accelerating loss of most elements that is not limited by weathering. It is uncertain, however, if the positive trends for DOC depend on increased production or a balancing release from the supply in mires and fens. In addition, there is also an indication of increasing inter annual concentration changescwith time. Although not exclusively proven such phenome would occur as a result of increased rainfall intensity. It is therefore likely that the accelerating loss of elements is a result of increased weathering rather than increasing water discharge.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64734 (URN)
Conference
16th Symposium on remediation, Jena, Germany, October 5-6, 2017
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-02-02Bibliographically approved
Sartz, L., Bäckström, M., Karlsson, S. & Allard, B. (2016). Mixing of acid rock drainage with alkaline leachates: Formation of solid precipitates and pH-buffering. Mine Water and the Environment, 35(1), 64-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixing of acid rock drainage with alkaline leachates: Formation of solid precipitates and pH-buffering
2016 (English)In: Mine Water and the Environment, ISSN 1025-9112, E-ISSN 1616-1068, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 64-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three metal-rich, acidic mine waters (from Bersbo and Ljusnarsberg, Sweden) were mixed with alkaline fly ash leachates in various proportions, representing a pH titration. Changes in pH and the loss of metals in solution due to precipitation of solid phases were tracked. Mineral equilibria and changes in pH and alkalinity were simulated using the geochemical code PHREEQC and the MINTEQv4 database, and the measured and simulated pH responses were compared. The formation of solid precipitates corresponded to fairly well-defined pH-buffering regions, reflecting the mine water compositions (notably the levels of Fe, Al, and Mn). Zn precipitation had a distinct buffering effect at near-neutral pH for the mine waters not dominated by iron. The formation of solid Mg phases (carbonate, as well as hydroxide) was indicated at high pH (above 9), but not formation of solid Ca phases, despite high sulfate levels. The phases that precipitated were various amorphous mixtures, mostly of the metals Fe, Al, Mn, Zn, and Mg. For the Fe-rich mine water, pH was poorly simulated with a simple MIX model, while alkalinity predictions agreed reasonably well with measured data. For the Al-rich mine waters, the simulated pH responses agreed well with the measurements. In an additional step, geochemical simulations were performed where selected proxy phases for major elements were forced to precipitate; this significantly improved the pH and alkalinity predictions. This approach may be more efficient than performing mixing experiments and titrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
ARD; CFB-fly ash; PHREEQC
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47911 (URN)10.1007/s10230-015-0347-3 (DOI)000371308400008 ()2-s2.0-84959228256 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

EU

Bergslagen region

Örebro University

Available from: 2016-02-03 Created: 2016-02-03 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, S., Allard, B., Rattray, J. E., Sjöberg, V. & Karlsson, S. (2016). REE-Enriched Mn-Oxide Precipitates in Water-Bearing Fractures in the Ytterby Mine, Sweden. In: Drebenstedt, C. & Paul, M. (Ed.), Mining Meets Water – Conflicts and Solutions: IMWA 2016 in Leipzig, Germany, July 11–15, 2016. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the International-Mine-Water-Association (IMWA 2016), Leipzig, Germany, July 11-15, 2016 (pp. 346-352). Freiberg: TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Mining and Special Civil Engineering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>REE-Enriched Mn-Oxide Precipitates in Water-Bearing Fractures in the Ytterby Mine, Sweden
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2016 (English)In: Mining Meets Water – Conflicts and Solutions: IMWA 2016 in Leipzig, Germany, July 11–15, 2016 / [ed] Drebenstedt, C. & Paul, M., Freiberg: TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Mining and Special Civil Engineering , 2016, p. 346-352Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Ytterby mine, Sweden, is known for the discovery of eight elements, including yttrium and five of the rare earth elements (REE). The mine was in operation from 1750 to 1933 and was after closure used as a storage depot for fuel from the 1950s to 1995. A tunnel was opened in the 1950s through the bedrock into the mine to allow access to the storage depot. Recent water monitoring campaigns (20122015) in the mine revealed a black substance (denoted YBS) in some fractures opening into the tunnel. Analysis of the YBS (elemental analysis, phase analysis by XRD, SEM with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, IR-and EPR-spectroscopy, preferential leaching at pH 4) showed that the main mineral component of the YBS is the manganese oxide birnessite. Also minor quantities of other less well defined manganese oxides were found, as well as silicates (quartz grains, possibly feldspar grains) and calcite. Birnessite has typically the composition Mx(Mn3+, Mn(2)(4+))O(4)xAq, with M= Na, Ca and x= 0.5. The birnessite component in YBS had a Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio of 1.04/0.96 with M = 0.42 Ca + 0.03 (REE+Y), 0.03 Mg and 0.03 other metals. All of these metals were firmly associated with the structure, since no release was observed at pH 4, except for significant fractions of the total Na, Mg, Ca-contents. Thus, REE+Y correspond to 1% of the total YBS mass and up to 3% of the metal content in the birnessite phase. This corresponds to an REE enrichment factor of the order 106 (YBS-birnessite/ fracture water). Birnessite with a substantial fraction of REE in the lattice has not previously been reported. The formation of birnessite is a microbial process. Identification of the microorganisms present in the Ytterby system is in progress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Freiberg: TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Mining and Special Civil Engineering, 2016
Keywords
Mine water geochemistry, manganese oxide precipitation, birnessite, rare earth elements
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58800 (URN)000402663400056 ()978-3-86012-533-5 (ISBN)
Conference
Annual Meeting of the International-Mine-Water-Association (IMWA 2016), Leipzig, Germany, July 11-15, 2016
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stockholm University (Sweden)  

Örebro University (Sweden)  

Friedrich Schiller University (Germany)  

Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Sjöberg, V. & Allard, B. (2015). Impact of humic substances on the transport of metals from a boreal watershed: Time trends and annual variability. In: : . Paper presented at 14th symposium on remediation, Jena, Germany, September 30 - October 1, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of humic substances on the transport of metals from a boreal watershed: Time trends and annual variability
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47952 (URN)
Conference
14th symposium on remediation, Jena, Germany, September 30 - October 1, 2015
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Grandin, A., Ogar, A., Sjöberg, V., Allard, B. & Karlsson, S. (2015). Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention. Minerals Engineering, 81, 173-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential use of native fungal strains for assisted uranium retention
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2015 (English)In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 81, p. 173-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Uranium-stabilizing ligands can be useful complexing agents for uranium in aqueous solution. The discovery of novel ligand candidates for selective uranium capture in artificial and natural waters could provide scope for their use in water remediation and metal recovery from low- and high grade ores. In this study we used seven fungal strains, isolated from shale waste, to monitor the uranium retention capacity from an aqueous solution. After four weeks of incubation, suspensions containing the fungal strains were filtered, and up to 100% of the total uranium inventory was removed from a 10 mg L-1 solution. Approximately 70% of the total uranium removal is attributed to complexation and/or adsorption by particles in the malt extract and some 10% is adsorbed by the fungal biomass. The additional 20% uranium removed could be related to the excretion of fungal metabolites. From 58% to 90% of the uranium is removed within ten minutes. The formation of colloidal/particulate uranium is proposed to be controlled by organic ligands in the culture medium and organic ligands excreted by the fungi where phosphorus moieties seem to be important. Membrane fouling by the hydrocarbons is also suggested to contribute to a loss of uranium from the aqueous phase.

Keywords
Biotechnology; Environmental; Pollution; Wasteprocessing
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46072 (URN)10.1016/j.mineng.2015.04.003 (DOI)000361253100023 ()2-s2.0-84940440497 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Academy of Economy, Science and Technology at Orebro University

Foundation of Polish Science

EU European Regional Development fund MPD/2009-3/5

Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, S., Rattray, J. E., Callac, N., Allard, B., Skelton, A., Dupraz, C., . . . Sjöberg, V. (2015). Putative Biogenic Signature found in Extremely REE Enriched Black Substance, Ytterby Mine, Sweden. In: Goldschmidt Abstracts: . Paper presented at Goldschmidt 2015, Prague, Czech Republic, August 16-21, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putative Biogenic Signature found in Extremely REE Enriched Black Substance, Ytterby Mine, Sweden
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2015 (English)In: Goldschmidt Abstracts, 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Characterization of a black substance seeping from fractured bedrock in a subterranean tunnel revealed a manganese and calcium bearing substance highly enriched in rare earth elements (REE). This tunnel is dry and at shallow depth and was built to convert the former Ytterby mine, into a fuel deposit for the Swedish Armed Forces. To keep the tunnel dry, groundwater level is kept below its natural level which has resulted in oxidizing conditions in a previously dysoxic or anoxic environment. The deposition of the substance therefore occurs in a dark and moist environment which was exposed to changing redox conditions.

Geochemical analysis show that the substance is enriched in REEs with concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding rocks. X-ray diffraction spectra indicate that the main component is birnessite. SEM revealed an internal lamination of these Mn-oxides implying an iterative change in production. Previous results show that REE occurrences in Ytterby are localized within pegmatites in the mine. It is thus suggested that Mn colloids, suspended in the local groundwater, work as metal traps and contribute to the mobility of the REEs. The black substance is suspected to act as a sink for these metals in the Ytterby mine area.

The influence of microorganisms on the accumulation of Mn-oxides appears to be important. The occurrence of the C31 to C35 extended side chain hopanoids among the identified biomarkers provides evidence of bacterial presence in the depositional environment. The abiotic vs biotic origin of the precipitated manganese was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The substance is composed of two or more components, with one part having a biogenic signature. Ongoing investigations of the microbial communities and the REE accumulation processes include δ13C analysis of the extracted lipids, DNA deep sequencing, quantitative PCR and sequential leaching

National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47953 (URN)
Conference
Goldschmidt 2015, Prague, Czech Republic, August 16-21, 2015
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Allard, B. (2014). Alunskiffer – avfall eller råvara?: vittring och lakbarhet vid naturligt pH-intervall. In: : . Paper presented at SveMins Miljökonferens, Skellefteå, Sweden, October 6-8, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alunskiffer – avfall eller råvara?: vittring och lakbarhet vid naturligt pH-intervall
2014 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Alunskiffer, vittring, lakning
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42049 (URN)
Conference
SveMins Miljökonferens, Skellefteå, Sweden, October 6-8, 2014
Available from: 2015-01-18 Created: 2015-01-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Allard, B., Grandin, A., Karlsson, S. & Sjöberg, V. (2014). Black shale: a biogeochemical archive. In: Kothe E, Büchel G (Ed.), Sedimentary Pore Space Cementation: Role of Microbes: . Paper presented at 13th Symposium on Remediation in Jena/13- Sanierungskolloquium. Sept. 25-26, 2014. Jena, Germany. (pp. 6).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black shale: a biogeochemical archive
2014 (English)In: Sedimentary Pore Space Cementation: Role of Microbes / [ed] Kothe E, Büchel G, 2014, p. 6-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Black shale, alum shale
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41963 (URN)
Conference
13th Symposium on Remediation in Jena/13- Sanierungskolloquium. Sept. 25-26, 2014. Jena, Germany.
Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Allard, B. & Paneva, E. (2014). Black shales in northern Europe: biogeochemical impact. In: Biogenic-Abiogenic interactions in natural and anthropogenic systems: . Paper presented at 5th International Symposium Biogenic-Abiogenic Interactions in natural and anthropogenuc systems, Saint Petersburg, Russia, October 20-22, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black shales in northern Europe: biogeochemical impact
2014 (English)In: Biogenic-Abiogenic interactions in natural and anthropogenic systems, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Black shale, environmental impact
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42054 (URN)
Conference
5th International Symposium Biogenic-Abiogenic Interactions in natural and anthropogenuc systems, Saint Petersburg, Russia, October 20-22, 2014
Available from: 2015-01-18 Created: 2015-01-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2104-4593

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