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Publications (10 of 128) Show all publications
Veen, J., Edholm, P., Rodriguez-Zamora, L., Folkesson, M., Kadi, F. & Nilsson, A. (2023). Adherence to the physical activity guideline beyond the recommended minimum weekly amount: impacts on indicators of physical function in older adults. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1197025.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to the physical activity guideline beyond the recommended minimum weekly amount: impacts on indicators of physical function in older adults
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1197025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The extent to which additional health benefits of accumulating twice the minimum amount of time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) affects indicators of physical function in older adults is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess indicators of physical function in older adults who accumulate at least 150 but less than 300 min/week of MVPA compared to those accumulating at least 300 min/week.

METHODS: Indicators of physical function, including handgrip strength, 5 times sit-to-stand test (5-STS), squat jump and 6-min walk test (6MWT) were assessed in a sample of 193 older men (n = 71, 67 ± 2 years), and women (n = 122, 67 ± 2 years), who all accumulated at least 150 weekly minutes of MVPA. Time in MVPA was assessed by accelerometry during 1 week and engagement in muscle strengthening activities (MSA) was assessed by self-report. Protein intake was assessed by a food-frequency-questionnaire. Participants were classified as physically active (≥150 but <300 min of MVPA per week) or as highly physically active (≥300 min of MVPA per week).

RESULTS: Factorial analysis of variance revealed that older adults accumulating at least 300 min of MVPA per week had a significantly (p < 0.05) better 6MWT performance and overall physical function compared to the less active group. These findings remained significant after further adjustment for MSA, sex, waist circumference and protein intake. In contrast, no significant differences in indicators of muscle strength were observed between the two groups.

DISCUSSION: Adherence to twice the recommended minimum amount of weekly MVPA time is related to a better physical function, evidenced by a better walking performance compared to adherence to the minimum weekly amount of MVPA. This finding emphasizes the benefits of accumulating daily MVPA beyond the minimum recommended amount to optimize the ability to perform activities of daily living, thus reducing the burden of physical disability and related health-care costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
exercise, sarcopenia, aging, muscle strength, physical performance, protein intake, six-minute walk tes
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-106714 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2023.1197025 (DOI)001016816400001 ()37383268 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85163007504 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 727565
Note

Funding agency:

Kamprad Family Foundation for Entrepreneurship, Research and Charity 20210070

Available from: 2023-06-30 Created: 2023-06-30 Last updated: 2023-08-01Bibliographically approved
Brook, M. S., Wilkinson, D. J., Tarum, J., Mitchell, K. W., Lund, J. L., Phillips, B. E., . . . Atherton, P. J. (2023). Neither myonuclear accretion nor a myonuclear domain size ceiling is a feature of the attenuated hypertrophic potential of aged human skeletal muscle. GeroScience, 45, 451-462
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neither myonuclear accretion nor a myonuclear domain size ceiling is a feature of the attenuated hypertrophic potential of aged human skeletal muscle
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2023 (English)In: GeroScience, ISSN 2509-2715, Vol. 45, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ageing limits growth capacity of skeletal muscle (e.g. in response to resistance exercise), but the role of satellite cell (SC) function in driving this phenomenon is poorly defined. Younger (Y) (~ 23 years) and older (O) men (~ 69 years) (normal-weight BMI) underwent 6 weeks of unilateral resistance exercise training (RET). Muscle biopsies were taken at baseline and after 3-/6-week training. We determined muscle size by fibre CSA (and type), SC number, myonuclei counts and DNA synthesis (via D2O ingestion). At baseline, there were no significant differences in fibre areas between Y and O. RET increased type I fibre area in Y from baseline at both 3 weeks and 6 weeks (baseline: 4509 ± 534 µm2, 3 weeks; 5497 ± 510 µm2 P < 0.05, 6 weeks; 5402 ± 352 µm2 P < 0.05), whilst O increased from baseline at 6 weeks only (baseline 5120 ± 403 µm2, 3 weeks; 5606 ± 620 µm2, 6 weeks; 6017 ± 482 µm2 P < 0.05). However, type II fibre area increased from baseline in Y at both 3 weeks and 6 weeks (baseline: 4949 ± 459 µm2, 3 weeks; 6145 ± 484 µm2 (P < 0.01), 6 weeks; 5992 ± 491 µm2 (P < 0.01), whilst O showed no change (baseline 5210 ± 410 µm2, 3 weeks; 5356 ± 535 µm2 (P = 0.9), 6 weeks; 5857 ± 478 µm2 (P = 0.1). At baseline, there were no differences in fibre myonuclei number between Y and O. RET increased type I fibre myonuclei number from baseline in both Y and O at 3 weeks and 6 weeks with RET (younger: baseline 2.47 ± 0.16, 3 weeks; 3.19 ± 0.16 (P < 0.001), 6 weeks; 3.70 ± 0.29 (P < 0.0001); older: baseline 2.29 ± 0.09, 3 weeks; 3.01 ± 0.09 (P < 0.001), 6 weeks; 3.65 ± 0.18 (P < 0.0001)). Similarly, type II fibre myonuclei number increased from baseline in both Y and O at 3 weeks and 6 weeks (younger: baseline 2.49 ± 0.14, 3 weeks; 3.31 ± 0.21 (P < 0.001), 6 weeks; 3.86 ± 0.29 (P < 0.0001); older: baseline 2.43 ± 0.12, 3 weeks; 3.37 ± 0.12 (P < 0.001), 6 weeks; 3.81 ± 0.15 (P < 0.0001)). DNA synthesis rates %.d-1 exhibited a main effect of training but no age discrimination. Declines in myonuclei addition do not underlie impaired muscle growth capacity in older humans, supporting ribosomal and proteostasis impairments as we have previously reported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Ageing, DNA synthesis, Myonuclei, Resistance exercise, Skeletal muscle
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-101167 (URN)10.1007/s11357-022-00651-y (DOI)000852113500001 ()36083436 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137816098 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

The Physiological Society

Dunhill Medical Trust R264/1112

UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) Medical Research Council UK (MRC) European Commission CIC12019  

Medical Research Council as part of the MRC-ARUK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research MR/R502364/1 MR/P021220/1 

Available from: 2022-09-12 Created: 2022-09-12 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Papaioannou, K.-G., Kadi, F. & Nilsson, A. (2022). Benefits of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption on Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Are Independent of Physical Activity Behaviors in Older Adults. Nutrients, 14(2), Article ID 263.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefits of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption on Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Are Independent of Physical Activity Behaviors in Older Adults
2022 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 14, no 2, article id 263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV) is suggested to reduce metabolic risk, there is a paucity of studies taking advantage of objectively assessed physical activity (PA) behaviors when exploring links between FV intake and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in older adults. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between FV intake and MetS prevalence in a population of older community-dwelling adults, while considering time spent being sedentary and health-enhancing PA. Prevalence of MetS was determined in a population of 93 men and 152 women (age: 65-70 years). FV intake was determined by self-report and PA behaviors (time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and in sedentary) were assessed by accelerometry. Likelihood of having MetS by FV intake was determined using logistic regression with stepwise backward elimination including age, sex, educational level, total energy intake, adherence to MVPA guideline and total sedentary time as covariates. A main finding was that lower FV intakes were significantly related to higher prevalence of MetS (odds ratio [OR]: 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.47) after considering potential influences by covariates. Additionally, we found that lower intake of vegetables but not fruits was significantly related to higher prevalence of MetS (OR: 1.47; 95%CI: 1.04-2.07). In conclusion, lower intakes of FV in general, and of vegetables in particular, significantly increased likelihood of MetS, regardless of time spent sedentary and adherence to the MVPA guideline. From a public health perspective, our findings emphasize adequate intakes of FV as an independent contributor to metabolic health status in older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
dietary pattern, metabolic health, obesity, nutrition, sedentary time, aging, exercise, education level
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-96828 (URN)10.3390/nu14020263 (DOI)000747821200001 ()35057444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122346877 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 727565
Available from: 2022-01-31 Created: 2022-01-31 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Papaioannou, K. G., Kadi, F. & Nilsson, A. (2022). Consumption of Vegetables Is Associated with Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults. Nutrients, 14(9), Article ID 1765.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Vegetables Is Associated with Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults
2022 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 1765Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is hypothesized that healthy diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV) can modulate the inflammatory status in older adults. However, to determine the actual impact of FV on inflammatory status, adiposity level and objectively assessed physical activity (PA) behaviors need to be considered. The aim of the present study was to explore associations between FV intake and biomarkers of systemic inflammation in older adults. Based on a sample of 233 older adults (65-70 years old), the following inflammatory biomarkers were assessed: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-18, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). FV intake was assessed by self-report, and PA behaviors encompassing time spent sedentary and in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) were determined using accelerometers. Associations between FV intake and inflammatory biomarkers were analyzed using stepwise linear regression models while adjusting for several covariates, including health-related food groups, adherence to the MVPA guidelines, total sedentary time, and waist circumference. While no significant associations were observed for the total FV intake, the vegetable intake was inversely associated with levels of IL6 (β = -0.15; p &lt; 0.05). In contrast, fruit intake was not associated with any inflammatory biomarker. In conclusion, our findings indicate beneficial associations between vegetable intake and levels of a pro-inflammatory biomarker in older adults, which strengthens public health efforts to promote vegetable-rich diets in older adults to mitigate age-related systemic inflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2022
Keywords
aging, dietary habits, inflammatory biomarkers, abdominal obesity, nutrition, sedentary time, physical activity
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99008 (URN)10.3390/nu14091765 (DOI)000794519100001 ()35565733 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128571700 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20210070
Note

Funding agencies:

EU HORIZON 2020 Research and Innovation Programme (European Joint Programming Initiative "A healthy diet for a healthy life" "JPI HDHL"

EU HORIZON 2020 Research and Innovation Programme (ERA-NET co-fund HDHL-INTIMIC) 727565

Available from: 2022-05-16 Created: 2022-05-16 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Veen, J., Montiel Rojas, D., Kadi, F. & Nilsson, A. (2022). Effects of Reallocating Time Spent in Different Physical Activity Intensities on Sarcopenia Risk in Older Adults: An Isotemporal Substitution Analysis. Biology, 11(1), Article ID 111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Reallocating Time Spent in Different Physical Activity Intensities on Sarcopenia Risk in Older Adults: An Isotemporal Substitution Analysis
2022 (English)In: Biology, E-ISSN 2079-7737, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of daily time spent sedentary and in different intensities of physical activity (PA) for the maintenance of muscle health currently remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the impact of reallocating time spent in different PA intensities on sarcopenia risk in older adults, while considering PA type (muscle strengthening activities, MSA) and protein intake. In a sample of 235 community-dwelling older adults (65-70 years), a sarcopenia risk score (SRS) was created based on muscle mass assessed by bioimpedance, together with handgrip strength and performance on the five times sit-to-stand (5-STS) test assessed by standardized procedures. Time spent in light-intensity PA (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and being sedentary was assessed by accelerometry, and PA type (MSA) by self-report. Linear regression models based on isotemporal substitution were employed. Reallocating sedentary time to at least LPA was significantly (p < 0.05) related to a lower SRS, which remained evident after adjustment by PA type (MSA) and protein intake. Similarly, reallocating time in LPA by MVPA was related to a significantly (p < 0.05) lower SRS. Our results emphasize the importance of displacing sedentary behaviours for more active pursuits, where PA of even light intensities may alleviate age-related deteriorations of muscle health in older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
aging, exercise, muscle mass, muscle strength
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-96831 (URN)10.3390/biology11010111 (DOI)000747481000001 ()35053109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122758385 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 727565
Available from: 2022-01-31 Created: 2022-01-31 Last updated: 2022-11-02Bibliographically approved
Papaioannou, K. G., Nilsson, A. & Kadi, F. (2022). Healthy Diets Rich in Vegetables and Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults. Paper presented at The 2nd International Electronic Conference on Nutrients, 15-31 March 2022, session Nutrition and Inflammation. Biology and Life Sciences Forum, 12(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy Diets Rich in Vegetables and Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults
2022 (English)In: Biology and Life Sciences Forum, E-ISSN 2673-9976, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to explore links between dietary habits and biomarkers of systemic inflammation in older adults. In a sample of 233 community-dwelling older adults (65–70 years), dietary habits were assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire. Physical activity and sedentary time were assessed using accelerometry. Inflammatory biomarkers were assessed from blood samples. The results showed that intake of vegetables was inversely related to levels of systemic inflammation (p < 0.05), independently of physical activity level. The present study strengthens public health efforts to promote vegetable-rich diets in older adults to mitigate age-related systemic inflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
aging; dietary patterns; inflammatory biomarkers; abdominal obesity; nutrition; sedentary time; physical activity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-100733 (URN)10.3390/IECN2022-12371 (DOI)
Conference
The 2nd International Electronic Conference on Nutrients, 15-31 March 2022, session Nutrition and Inflammation
Available from: 2022-08-22 Created: 2022-08-22 Last updated: 2022-08-23Bibliographically approved
Bauset, C., Martínez-Aspas, A., Smith-Ballester, S., García-Vigara, A., Monllor-Tormos, A., Kadi, F., . . . Cano, A. (2022). Nuts and Metabolic Syndrome: Reducing the Burden of Metabolic Syndrome in Menopause. Nutrients, 14(8), Article ID 1677.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nuts and Metabolic Syndrome: Reducing the Burden of Metabolic Syndrome in Menopause
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2022 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 14, no 8, article id 1677Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Menopause imposes a dramatic fall in estrogens, which is followed by an increase in the proportion of fat. The rising androgen/estrogen ratio along the menopause transition favors the accumulation of central fat, which contributes to insulin resistance and a series of concatenated effects, leading to a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome. The modulatory effect of diet on the metabolic syndrome phenotype has been shown for the Mediterranean diet, and nuts are key determinants of these health benefits. This review of the impact of nuts on the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome cluster examined studies-prioritizing meta-analyses and systemic reviews-to summarize the potential benefits of nut ingestion on the risk of metabolic syndrome associated with menopause. Nuts have a general composition profile that includes macronutrients, with a high proportion of unsaturated fat, bioactive compounds, and fiber. The mechanisms set in motion by nuts have shown different levels of efficacy against the disturbances associated with metabolic syndrome, but a beneficial impact on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism, and a potential, but minimal reduction in blood pressure and fat accumulation have been found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
menopause, metabolic syndrome, nuts, women
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-98785 (URN)10.3390/nu14081677 (DOI)000787957700001 ()35458240 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128510306 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 696300
Available from: 2022-05-02 Created: 2022-05-02 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Gharahdaghi, N., Rudrappa, S., Brook, M. S., Farrash, W., Idris, I., Aziz, M. H., . . . Atherton, P. J. (2022). Pharmacological hypogonadism impairs molecular transducers of exercise-induced muscle growth in humans. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, 13(2), 1134-1150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacological hypogonadism impairs molecular transducers of exercise-induced muscle growth in humans
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, ISSN 2190-5991, E-ISSN 2190-6009, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 1134-1150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The relative role of skeletal muscle mechano-transduction in comparison with systemic hormones, such as testosterone (T), in regulating hypertrophic responses to exercise is contentious. We investigated the mechanistic effects of chemical endogenous T depletion adjuvant to 6 weeks of resistance exercise training (RET) on muscle mass, function, myogenic regulatory factors, and muscle anabolic signalling in younger men.

METHODS: Non-hypogonadal men (n = 16; 18-30 years) were randomized in a double-blinded fashion to receive placebo (P, saline n = 8) or the GnRH analogue, Goserelin [Zoladex (Z), 3.6 mg, n = 8], injections, before 6 weeks of supervised whole-body RET. Participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), ultrasound of m. vastus lateralis (VL), and VL biopsies for assessment of cumulative muscle protein synthesis (MPS), myogenic gene expression, and anabolic signalling pathway responses.

RESULTS: Zoladex suppressed endogenous T to within the hypogonadal range and was well tolerated; suppression was associated with blunted fat free mass [Z: 55.4 ± 2.8 to 55.8 ± 3.1 kg, P = 0.61 vs. P: 55.9 ± 1.7 to 57.4 ± 1.7 kg, P = 0.006, effect size (ES) = 0.31], composite strength (Z: 40 ± 2.3% vs. P: 49.8 ± 3.3%, P = 0.03, ES = 1.4), and muscle thickness (Z: 2.7 ± 0.4 to 2.69 ± 0.36 cm, P > 0.99 vs. P: 2.74 ± 0.32 to 2.91 ± 0.32 cm, P < 0.0001, ES = 0.48) gains. Hypogonadism attenuated molecular transducers of muscle growth related to T metabolism (e.g. androgen receptor: Z: 1.2 fold, P > 0.99 vs. P: 1.9 fold, P < 0.0001, ES = 0.85), anabolism/myogenesis (e.g. IGF-1Ea: Z: 1.9 fold, P = 0.5 vs. P: 3.3 fold, P = 0.0005, ES = 0.72; IGF-1Ec: Z: 2 fold, P > 0.99 vs. P: 4.7 fold, P = 0.0005, ES = 0.68; myogenin: Z: 1.3 fold, P > 0.99 vs. P: 2.7 fold, P = 0.002, ES = 0.72), RNA/DNA (Z: 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.53 ± 0.03, P = 0.31 vs. P: 0.50 ± 0.01 to 0.64 ± 0.04, P = 0.003, ES = 0.72), and RNA/ASP (Z: 5.8 ± 0.4 to 6.8 ± 0.5, P > 0.99 vs. P: 6.5 ± 0.2 to 8.9 ± 1.1, P = 0.008, ES = 0.63) ratios, as well as acute RET-induced phosphorylation of growth signalling proteins (e.g. AKTser473 : Z: 2.74 ± 0.6, P = 0.2 vs. P: 5.5 ± 1.1 fold change, P < 0.001, ES = 0.54 and mTORC1ser2448 : Z: 1.9 ± 0.8, P > 0.99 vs. P: 3.6 ± 1 fold change, P = 0.002, ES = 0.53). Both MPS (Z: 1.45 ± 0.11 to 1.50 ± 0.06%·day-1 , P = 0.99 vs. P: 1.5 ± 0.12 to 2.0 ± 0.15%·day-1 , P = 0.01, ES = 0.97) and (extrapolated) muscle protein breakdown (Z: 93.16 ± 7.8 vs. P: 129.1 ± 13.8 g·day-1 , P = 0.04, ES = 0.92) were reduced with hypogonadism result in lower net protein turnover (3.9 ± 1.1 vs. 1.2 ± 1.1 g·day-1 , P = 0.04, ES = 0.95).

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that endogenous T sufficiency has a central role in the up-regulation of molecular transducers of RET-induced muscle hypertrophy in humans that cannot be overcome by muscle mechano-transduction alone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
Testosterone, Exercise training, Muscle protein synthesis, Hypertrophy
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-97743 (URN)10.1002/jcsm.12843 (DOI)000762589200001 ()35233984 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125434305 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Medical Research Council as part of the MRC-Versus Arthritis Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research MR/R502364/1 MR/P021220/1

Available from: 2022-03-07 Created: 2022-03-07 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Särnblad, S., Ponsot, E., Leprêtre, P.-M. & Kadi, F. (2021). Acute effects of aerobic continuous, intermittent and resistance exercise on glycemia in adolescents males with type 1 diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes, 22(4), 610-617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute effects of aerobic continuous, intermittent and resistance exercise on glycemia in adolescents males with type 1 diabetes
2021 (English)In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 610-617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Increased levels of physical activity is often associated with reduced HbA1c in individuals with diabetes. However, the effect on glycemic control differs between different programs of exercise. The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects on glycemia of resistance and two aerobic continuous and intermittent exercise bouts in adolescent males with type 1 diabetes.

METHODS: Eight active males with type 1 diabetes (17.5±0.8 years, BMI: 20.8±2.2 kg/m2 , HbA1c: 7.2±0.5 % (54.9±5.3 mmol/mol)) performed four experimental sessions - non-exercise (control), resistance exercise (RE) and two isocaloric continuous (CE) and intermittent (IE) cycling exercise trials - in a randomized order. Each session consisted of 45 minutes of exercise (except for the control modality) and 60 minutes of passive recovery. Venous blood was drawn for assessment of plasma glucose (PG). A two-way repeated-measures ANOVA was used for statistical comparisons.

RESULTS: A significant time-to-exercise interaction effect on PG was detected. PG significantly decreased during IE (-5.1±1.6 mmol/L) and CE (-5.4 ± 1.8 mmol/L) but not during RE (-1.0 ± 1.4 mmol/L, ns). Additionally, decreases in PG after IE and CE were sustained throughout the recovery period.

CONCLUSIONS: While intermittent and continuous aerobic exercises are associated with a lowering of glycemia in male adolescents with type 1 diabetes, glycemia remained stable without significant alterations after resistance exercise. These findings hold important implications related to clinical exercise advice and disease management in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2021
Keywords
adolescents, exercise, type 1 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90088 (URN)10.1111/pedi.13194 (DOI)000630299900001 ()33650298 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85102656839 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Childhood diabetes foundation, Linköping, Sweden  

Nyckelfonden, Örebro County Research foundation, Sweden 

Available from: 2021-03-03 Created: 2021-03-03 Last updated: 2021-06-02Bibliographically approved
Bergens, O., Nilsson, A. & Kadi, F. (2021). Associations between Circulating Inflammatory Biomarkers and Indicators of Muscle Health in Older Men and Women. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 10(22), Article ID 5316.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between Circulating Inflammatory Biomarkers and Indicators of Muscle Health in Older Men and Women
2021 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 10, no 22, article id 5316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Systemic inflammation is believed to contribute to declining muscle health during aging. The present study aims to examine associations between indicators of muscle health and pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in older men and women, while also considering the impacts of physical activity and protein intake. An assessment of skeletal muscle index (SMI) by bioelectrical impedance analysis, handgrip strength, and 5-sit-to-stand time, using standardized procedures, was conducted in a population of older men (n = 90) and women (n = 148) aged 65-70 years. The inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were assessed in blood samples. Data were analyzed and stratified according to biological sex using multiple linear regression models. In older women, SMI was inversely associated with the pro-inflammatory markers CRP (β = -0.372; p < 0.05), fibrinogen (β = -0.376; p < 0.05), and IL-6 (β = -0.369; p < 0.05). Importantly, these associations were independent of abdominal adiposity (waist circumference), protein intake, physical activity level, as well as any adherence to muscle strengthening guidelines (≥2 sessions/week). In contrast, no corresponding associations were observed in men. In conclusion, our findings indicate the detrimental influence of a pro-inflammatory environment on muscle health regardless of important lifestyle-related factors in older women. However, the lack of such associations in older men highlights the importance of considering biological sex when examining the complex interaction between the systemic inflammatory environment and muscle health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Aging, inflammatory biomarkers, muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle strengthening activities, obesity, physical activity, protein intake
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-95657 (URN)10.3390/jcm10225316 (DOI)000725211000001 ()34830593 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118957726 (Scopus ID)
Funder
European Commission, 727565
Available from: 2021-11-29 Created: 2021-11-29 Last updated: 2022-08-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9831-0896

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