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Lundberg, K. G. & Sataøen, H. L. (2019). From translation of ideas to translocal relations: shifting heuristics from Scandinavian Neo-Institutional Theory to institutional ethnography (1ed.). In: Rebecca W. B. Lund & Ann Christin E. Nilsen (Ed.), Institutional Ethnography in the Nordic Region: (pp. 39-50). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From translation of ideas to translocal relations: shifting heuristics from Scandinavian Neo-Institutional Theory to institutional ethnography
2019 (English)In: Institutional Ethnography in the Nordic Region / [ed] Rebecca W. B. Lund & Ann Christin E. Nilsen, London: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 39-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

“Scandinavian neo-institutionalism” (SNIT) is an influential school within organisational research and institutional theory in the Nordic research context and beyond. As a social constructivist tradition in organisational research, it has contributed to the international research on loose couplings and translation of ideas. Although influential, we argue that SNIT has shortcomings when it comes to understanding power, actors and agency. This chapter offers a critical discussion of how Institutional Ethnography (IE) can provide fruitful avenues for this research tradition by addressing human actors as well as practices of power in the study of organisations. Firstly, the chapter presents central aspects of SNIT and discusses its relation to institutional theory. In doing so, it identifies shortcomings in how these traditions address human relations and power. Secondly, the chapter presents and discusses IE’s potential to close the identified gaps. IE directs attention to processes of change within contemporary organisations and, using the concepts of ruling relations and the translocal, provides an alternative to the neo-institutional concepts of travel and translation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Research Methods
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78013 (URN)9780367030353 (ISBN)9780429019999 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. (2019). Sub-sector branding and nation branding: the case of higher education. Corporate Communications. An International Journal, 24(3), 425-438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sub-sector branding and nation branding: the case of higher education
2019 (English)In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 425-438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This paper concerns public sub-sector branding within the higher education (HE) system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how public sub-sector branding within HE is organized and how it is influenced by the use of national values, traits and characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach: The study relies on two data sources: first, the paper benefits from a data set of one-stop web-portals for HE from the 23 countries listed in Times Higher Education’s top-60 universities ranking. Second, it builds on a sample and brief overview of Norway’s sub-sector branding of its HE sector.

Findings: Expert authorities within the HE sector are legally and organizationally responsible for sub-sector branding, and they establish coordinated and coherent web-portals. In practice, however, nation-branding concerns are influencing on how the HE sub-sector is branded. The paper concludes with a discussion of democratic implications, and points to paradoxes arising from the use of national clichés and characteristics in this highly international sub-sector of the public realm.

Originality/value: The paper informs discussions about public sub-sector branding within HE, a phenomenon that thus far has not been systematically studied. The practical applications of such a study are evident, as branding is becoming more important in the public sector in general, and in HE in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Corporate governance, Public sector organizations, Corporate branding
National Category
Media and Communications Public Administration Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74694 (URN)10.1108/CCIJ-05-2018-0056 (DOI)000486159300003 ()2-s2.0-85067891107 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. & Nygård, D. (2018). Omdømmehåndtering i høyere utdanning: Argumentasjon og selvfremstilling i studiekataloger. Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, 20(1), 45-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Omdømmehåndtering i høyere utdanning: Argumentasjon og selvfremstilling i studiekataloger
2018 (Norwegian)In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 45-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reputation management is an important practice for contemporary highereducation institutions. In this article, the viewbooks of 9 Norwegian universitiesand university colleges are analyzed. We find that higher educationinstitutions often communicate a complex, diverse and sometimes evencontradictory profile towards prospective students. Further, we find manysimilarities between the different viewbooks, and a limited degree of sharpdistinctions towards competitors. This is not in line with the dominatingrecommendations of the management literature on the topic, claiming thata strong reputation is built through consistent communication and differentiationvis-à-vis competitors. We ask if the findings signalize an institutionalizationof the image of which characteristics a “good higher educationinstitutions” must possess, limiting the space for reputation building througha more singular and distinct profile. Higher education institutions must payattention to diverse (and often conflicting) goals and values in their reputationmanagement, and incorporate them simultaneously in their communicationto achieve legitimacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Fagbokforlaget, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71286 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. (2018). Regulokratene: Den nye styringsprofesjonen?. Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift, 2(6), 481-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulokratene: Den nye styringsprofesjonen?
2018 (Norwegian)In: Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift, ISSN 1590-7929, E-ISSN 1936-4660, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 481-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What characterizes the regulocrats within the higher education sector in Norway andSweden? How can the regulocrats’ role be related to the development of specific instituti-onal designs within the higher education sector? These questions are answered by meansof empirical studies of regulocrats in Norway and Sweden, within the field of higher edu-cation regulation. The regulocrats are an emerging profession working in autonomoussingle purpose regulatory agencies. The profession is increasingly important to the imp-lementation of policy and regulation. There is surprisingly little empirical evidence aboutthis professional role, and the article shows that the professionalization of the regulocratsis related to the ideal of independence. The emerging profession contributes to the insti-tutional design of regulocracy or regulatory capitalism, which implies a transformation ofthe classical bureaucracy in the modern administrative state, where all (both organizations,groups and individuals) are expected to invest more in regulation, understood as monito-ring, supervision, transparency and control. Within the higher education sector, regulati-ons are perceived as important because they benefit (the individual) students and creategood conditions for making rational choices in the education market. Although the regu-locrats in Norway and Sweden share much of the same professional ideals, there are alsodifferences between the two countries. Where the Swedish regulocrats are formalistic, theNorwegian counterpart is sensitive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2018
Keywords
Profesjoner, regulokrater, komparasjon, statsforvaltning
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70088 (URN)10.18261/issn.2535-2512-2018-06-03 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. (2018). Transforming the "€œThird Mission"€ in Norwegian Higher Education Institutions: A Boundary Object Theory Approach. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 62(1), 52-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transforming the "€œThird Mission"€ in Norwegian Higher Education Institutions: A Boundary Object Theory Approach
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 52-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Higher education institutions (HEIs) in Norway have been subjected to several reforms in recent decades. There are transformed relationships between institutions and their environment, and higher educations’ third mission is emphasized. To improve our understanding of HEIs’ third mission, this paper employs boundary object theory, enabling us to see how shifting projects are shaped and negotiated within these institutions. The paper concludes with a discussion of five main projects that are evident in third-mission presentations: the entrepreneurial project, the local and regional involvement project, the mode 2 project, the popular-science project, and the reputation project.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
boundary objects; Higher education; strategic planning; third mission
National Category
Sociology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52082 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2016.1212253 (DOI)000417602100004 ()2-s2.0-84981275620 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. & Wæraas, A. (2018). What we stand for: Reputation platforms in Scandinavian higher education. In: Tom Christensen, Åse Gornitzka, Francisco O. Ramirez (Ed.), Universities as Agencies: Reputation and Professionalization (pp. 155-181). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What we stand for: Reputation platforms in Scandinavian higher education
2018 (English)In: Universities as Agencies: Reputation and Professionalization / [ed] Tom Christensen, Åse Gornitzka, Francisco O. Ramirez, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 155-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Reputation is derived from “being known for something” (Lange, Lee, & Dai, 2010, p. 157). Accordingly, reputation and branding literatures emphasize that reputation is built from “common starting points” (van Riel, 1995, p. 35), “an innermost substance” (Kapferer, 2008, p. 95), or “irrefutable essence” (Keller, 1999, p. 45), indicating what organizations stand for, and which “each company will be able to identify” (van Riel, 1995, p. 19). The definition of these characteristics typically results from strategy processes, and may include various symbolic expressions such as core values, visions, missions, brand propositions, and taglines. Positive associations are assumed to be stimulated in the minds of observers when all external communication is derived from such platforms in a consistent manner (van Riel & Fombrun, 2007).

This chapter examines the contents of reputation platforms used by Scandinavian higher education institutions. More specifically, we focus on core value statements as they are presented on these institutions’ web sites. Core value statements are prominent aspects of reputation platforms not only because they define what organizations stand for and want to be known for (Sataøen, 2015), but also because they guide any work intended to influence reputation. Whereas a number of studies have revealed higher education institutions’ interest in a favorable reputation (Aula & Tienari, 2011; Bowman & Bastedo, 2009; Christensen & Gornitzka, 2017; Wæraas & Solbakk, 2009), no research has, to our knowledge, examined the platforms defined by universities and colleges as the starting point for their reputation management efforts and distinguished between the different types of desired reputations associated with these platforms. For example, it is not known whether higher education institutions fill their reputation platforms with core values implicating a performative or a moral reputation (see chapter 1). Accordingly, we ask, which types of values do Scandinavian higher education institutions seek to be known for, and which type of reputation do they implicate?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Series
Public Sector Organizations
Keywords
Core value statements, Reputation platforms, Rationalization of higher education, Scandinavian higher education institutions
National Category
Public Administration Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68734 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-92713-8 (DOI)978-3-319-92712-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-92713-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L., Brekke, O. A. & Angell, S. I. (2017). Distriktsvenleg, miljøvenleg og klimavenleg?: Drivkrefter i utviklinga av småkraft i Hardanger. Tidsskriftet Utmark (1), 68-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distriktsvenleg, miljøvenleg og klimavenleg?: Drivkrefter i utviklinga av småkraft i Hardanger
2017 (Norwegian)In: Tidsskriftet Utmark, ISSN 1502-3532, E-ISSN 1502-3532, no 1, p. 68-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Norway, small scale hydro power projects developed rapidly both in scope and volume in the post-millennium period. This was the result of a particular window of time in the environmental and energy field in Norway. In the Hardanger-region this development has been particularly noticeable, and thearticle describes the development through analyses of the licensing process and the regional general publics. The article asks the following questions: What characterizes the development of the licensing processes? What conflicts and arguments in the public domain characterize this development, and how is this played out against the historical development of natural resource management in the Hardanger-region?The analysis shows that in the early 2000s small scale hydro power projects were framed as both climate-friendly, environmentally benign and a catalyst for rural development. However, these arguments have all become contested in later years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lillehammer: Norsk institutt for naturforskning (NINA), 2017
Keywords
Natural resource management, small scale hydropower, public opinion
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59435 (URN)
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-05Bibliographically approved
Sataøen, H. L. & Wæraas, A. (2016). Building a Sector Reputation: The Strategic Communication of National Higher Education. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 10(3), 165-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building a Sector Reputation: The Strategic Communication of National Higher Education
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Strategic Communication, ISSN 1553-118X, E-ISSN 1553-1198, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What characterises strategic communication aimed at building the reputation of an entire public subsector? This is the main question for this study, pursued through content analysis of one-stop web portals for national higher education from the 21 countries listed in the Times Higher Education’s Top 150 Universities ranking. Findings show that strategic communication is formed by national governments to depict their higher education sector as a coherent whole without letting prominent universities “represent” the higher education sector. The tension between similarity and difference that often occurs in public sector reputation-building is handled partly by emphasising similarity concerns in the structure and format of the presentations, and partly by emphasising differentiation concerns in the contents of the presentations. Furthermore, in contrast to previous studies addressing either the reputation management and branding efforts of single institutions, specific public sector entities, or those of nations, this study shows how higher education reputation-building integrates these different levels through strategic communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52083 (URN)10.1080/1553118X.2016.1176567 (DOI)2-s2.0-84973106724 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, K. & Sataøen, H. (2016). Kvalitativ Sykepleieforskning: En studie av refleksjoner om forskerens situering. Klinisk Sygepleje (4), 254-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kvalitativ Sykepleieforskning: En studie av refleksjoner om forskerens situering
2016 (Norwegian)In: Klinisk Sygepleje, ISSN 0902-2767, E-ISSN 1903-2285, no 4, p. 254-267Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In qualitative research, the relation between the researcher and the informants requires reflection. This is particularly important where researchers and fields are closely linked, e.g. through professional education or work experience.

Aim: To examine how qualitative nursing researchers reflect upon their membership in the groups or areas being studied.

Methods: By employing content analysis, the article investigates how articles in the Nordic Journal for Nursing Research reflect upon researcher positioning. The sample includes 57 articles using qualitative research methods.

Result: We find a lack of reflections regarding the researchers' position, but to the extent it is done, we often find variations of an ideal wherein educated nurses are seen as being in a privileged position to conduct qualitative research within the health care sector. We analyse this ideal in light of the emergence of nursing science as discipline, and in light of the “insider / outsider” debate in the social sciences.

Conclusion: While this ideal contains valid aspects related to experience-based insights and practice related knowledge, it also contains a normative dimension where justifications of the researchers’ own positions are important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2016
Keywords
epistemology, qualitative research, nursing research, insider/outsider
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53353 (URN)10.18261/issn.1903-2285-2016-04-03 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-02 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Wæraas, A. & Sataøen, H. L. (2015). Being All Things to All Customers: Building Reputation in an Institutionalized Field. British Journal of Management, 26(2), 310-326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being All Things to All Customers: Building Reputation in an Institutionalized Field
2015 (English)In: British Journal of Management, ISSN 1045-3172, E-ISSN 1467-8551, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper seeks to draw empirical attention to the relationship between legitimacy and reputation in institutionalized fields. Norwegian hospitals find themselves in a strongly institutionalized field and do not want to differentiate from each other, despite seeking a favorable reputation. In order to acquire insights into the conditions that prompt organizations to reject differentiation, we carried out qualitative interviews with the hospitals' communication directors. Three sets of justifications for not differentiating emerged from an inductive analysis of these interviews. Differentiation is not adapted to the universalistic needs of the hospitals, not in accordance with solidarity norms, and not a pragmatic solution. The analysis suggests that the hospitals face a trade-off between the contradictory demands of similarity and difference and hence legitimacy and reputation: They renounce the advantage of a unique reputation (i.e. competitive advantage) in order to retain the benefits of conformity (i.e. legitimacy). Implications of these findings for our understanding of the relative salience of legitimacy and reputation and the dynamics between them are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52089 (URN)10.1111/1467-8551.12044 (DOI)000353894700012 ()2-s2.0-84927800733 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Norwegian Research Council 177475

Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8500-1114

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