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Ericson Jogsten, IngridORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6330-789X
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Publications (10 of 61) Show all publications
Hartz, W. F., Björnsdotter, M. K., Yeung, L. W. Y., Hodson, A., Thomas, E. R., Humby, J. D., . . . Kallenborn, R. (2023). Levels and distribution profiles of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in a high Arctic Svalbard ice core. Science of the Total Environment, 871, Article ID 161830.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels and distribution profiles of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in a high Arctic Svalbard ice core
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2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 871, article id 161830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of persistent organic contaminants of which some are toxic and bioaccumulative. Several PFAS can be formed from the atmospheric degradation of precursors such as fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) as well as hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HFCs) and other ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compounds. Svalbard ice cores have been shown to provide a valuable record of long-range atmospheric transport of contaminants to the Arctic. This study uses a 12.3 m ice core from the remote Lomonosovfonna ice cap on Svalbard to understand the atmospheric deposition of PFAS in the Arctic. A total of 45 PFAS were targeted, of which 26 were detected, using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) MS/MS. C2 to C11 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were detected continuously in the ice core and their fluxes ranged from 2.5 to 8200 ng m-2 yr-1 (9.51-16,500 pg L-1). Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) represented 71 % of the total mass of C2 - C11 PFCAs in the ice core and had increasing temporal trends in deposition. The distribution profile of PFCAs suggested that FTOHs were likely the atmospheric precursor to C8 - C11 PFCAs, whereas C2 - C6 PFCAs had alternative sources, such as HFCs and other CFC replacement compounds. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was also widely detected in 82 % of ice core subsections, and its isomer profile (81 % linear) indicated an electrochemical fluorination manufacturing source. Comparisons of PFAS concentrations with a marine aerosol proxy showed that marine aerosols were insignificant for the deposition of PFAS on Lomonosovfonna. Comparisons with a melt proxy showed that TFA and PFOS were mobile during meltwater percolation. This indicates that seasonal snowmelt and runoff from post-industrial accumulation on glaciers could be a significant seasonal source of PFAS to ecosystems in Arctic fjords.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Fluorotelomer alcohols, Hydrofluorocarbons, Long-range transport, Snowmelt, Temporal trends, Trifluoroacetic acid
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103896 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.161830 (DOI)000965591500001 ()36716880 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147542316 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01284Knowledge Foundation, 20160019
Note

Funding agencies:

United Kingdom Research and Innovation Natural Environment Research Council

Oxford Doctoral Training Partnership in Environmental Research NE/L002612/1

Burdett-Coutts Trust

Svalbard Science Forum Arctic Field Grant 2019 11121

Research Council of Norway 196218/S30

Fram Centre Flagship program 534/75219

Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2023-05-03Bibliographically approved
Björnsdotter, M., Yeung, L. W. Y., Kärrman, A. & Ericson Jogsten, I. (2022). Mass Balance of Perfluoroalkyl Acids, Including Trifluoroacetic Acid, in a Freshwater Lake. Environmental Science and Technology, 56(1), 251-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass Balance of Perfluoroalkyl Acids, Including Trifluoroacetic Acid, in a Freshwater Lake
2022 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 251-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent chemicals that are ubiquitously found in the environment. The atmospheric degradation of precursor compounds has been identified as a source of PFAAs and might be an important pathway for contamination. Lake Vättern is one of Sweden's largest lakes and is an important source for drinking water. In addition to contamination via atmospheric deposition, the lake is subject to several potential contamination sources via surface water inflow. The relevance of different sources is not well understood. A mass balance of selected PFAAs was assembled based on measured concentrations in atmospheric deposition, surface water from streams that constitute the main inflow and outflow, and surface water in the lake. The largest input was seen for trifluoroacetic acid (150 kg/year), perfluoropropanoic acid (1.6 kg/year), perfluorobutanoic acid (4.0 kg/year), and perfluoro-octanoic acid (1.5 kg/year). Both atmospheric deposition and surface water inflow was found to be important input pathways. There was a positive correlation between the input of most perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids via atmospheric deposition and global radiation and between the input via surface water inflow and catchment area. These findings highlight the importance of atmospheric oxidation of volatile precursor compounds for contamination in surface waters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2022
Keywords
Atmospheric deposition, atmospheric oxidation, flux, global radiation, precursors, ultrashort-chain perfluoroalkyl acids
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-96088 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.1c04472 (DOI)000763499800025 ()34927432 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121909600 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01284Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-16-030 2219-17-012Knowledge Foundation, 20160019
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2022-04-07Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Storm, N., Ericson Jogsten, I. & Yeung, L. W. Y. (2022). Utilization of organic and inorganic waste products for removal of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in highly contaminated water. In: DIOXIN 2022: Proceedings. Paper presented at 42nd International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants (DIOXIN 2022), New Orleans, USA, October 9-14, 2022 (pp. 183-186). , 83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilization of organic and inorganic waste products for removal of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in highly contaminated water
2022 (English)In: DIOXIN 2022: Proceedings, 2022, Vol. 83, p. 183-186Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103872 (URN)
Conference
42nd International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants (DIOXIN 2022), New Orleans, USA, October 9-14, 2022
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20160019 20190105
Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2023-02-02Bibliographically approved
Björnsdotter, M., Hartz, W. F., Kallenborn, R., Ericson Jogsten, I., Humby, J. D., Kärrman, A. & Yeung, L. W. Y. (2021). Levels and Seasonal Trends of C1-C4 Perfluoroalkyl Acids and the Discovery of Trifluoromethane Sulfonic Acid in Surface Snow in the Arctic. Environmental Science and Technology, 55(23), 15853-15861
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels and Seasonal Trends of C1-C4 Perfluoroalkyl Acids and the Discovery of Trifluoromethane Sulfonic Acid in Surface Snow in the Arctic
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2021 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 55, no 23, p. 15853-15861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

C1-C4 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent chemicals that have been found in the environment. To date, much uncertainty still exists about their sources and fate. The importance of the atmospheric degradation of volatile precursors to C1-C4 PFAAs were investigated by studying their distribution and seasonal variation in remote Arctic locations. C1-C4 PFAAs were measured in surface snow on the island of Spitsbergen in the Norwegian Arctic during January-August 2019. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), perfluoropropanoic acid (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), and trifluoromethane sulfonic acid (TFMS) were detected in most samples, including samples collected at locations presumably receiving PFAA input solely from long-range processes. The flux of TFA, PFPrA, PFBA, and TFMS per precipitation event was in the ranges of 22-1800, 0.79-16, 0.19-170, and 1.5-57 ng/m2, respectively. A positive correlation between the flux of TFA, PFPrA, and PFBA with downward short-wave solar radiation was observed. No correlation was observed between the flux of TFMS and solar radiation. These findings suggest that atmospheric transport of volatile precursors and their subsequent degradation plays a major role in the global distribution of C2-C4 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids and their consequential deposition in Arctic environments. The discovery of TFMS in surface snow at these remote Arctic locations suggests that TFMS is globally distributed. However, the transport mechanism to the Arctic environment remains unknown.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2021
Keywords
perfluoroalkyl substances, ultrashort-chain perfluoroalkyl acids, trifluoroacetic acid, solar radiation, atmospheric oxidation, atmospheric deposition, precursors, Arctic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-95441 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.1c04776 (DOI)000758717600030 ()34779623 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119963214 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01284Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-16-030 2219-17-012
Note

Funding agencies:

British National Environmental Research Council

Oxford Doctoral Training Partnership in Environmental ResearcNE/L002612/1

Burdett-Coutts Trust

Svalbard Science Forum Arctic Field Grant 2019 11121

Research Council of Norway 196218/S30  

Fram Centre Flagship program (PharmArctic) 534/75219

Knowledge Foundation (Enforce Research Project) 20160019 

Available from: 2021-11-18 Created: 2021-11-18 Last updated: 2022-03-09Bibliographically approved
Björnsdotter, M., Yeung, L. W. Y., Kärrman, A. & Ericson Jogsten, I. (2020). Challenges in the analytical determination of ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids and implications for environmental and human health. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 412, 4785-4796
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in the analytical determination of ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids and implications for environmental and human health
2020 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 412, p. 4785-4796Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids have recently gained attention due to increasing environmental concentrations being observed. The most well-known ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acid is trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) which has been studied since the 1990s. Potential sources and the fate of ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids other than TFA are not well studied and data reporting their environmental occurrence is scarce. The analytical determination of ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids is challenging due to their high polarity resulting in low retention using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Furthermore, recent studies have reported varying extraction recoveries in water samples depending on the water matrix and different methods have been suggested to increase the extraction recovery. The present review gives an overview of the currently used analytical methods and summarizes the findings regarding potential analytical challenges. In addition, the current state of knowledge regarding TFA and other ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids, namely perfluoropropanoic acid, trifluoromethane sulfonic acid, perfluoroethane sulfonic acid, and perfluoropropane sulfonic acid‚ are reviewed. Both known and potential sources as well as environmental concentrations are summarized and discussed together with their fate and the environmental and human implications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Perfluoroethane sulfonic acid, Perfluoropropane sulfonic acid, Perfluoropropanoic acid, Trifluoroacetic acid, Trifluoromethane sulfonic acid, Ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acid, Extraction, Analytical challenge, Analytical determination, Environmental concentration, Environmental occurrence, Perfluoroalkyl acids, Reversed phase liquid-chromatography, Liquid chromatography
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-81970 (URN)10.1007/s00216-020-02692-8 (DOI)000532156300001 ()32399685 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084523174 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01284Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-16-030 2219-17-012Knowledge Foundation, 20160019
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University

Available from: 2020-05-22 Created: 2020-05-22 Last updated: 2022-02-03Bibliographically approved
Mullin, L., Jobst, K., DiLorenzo, R. A., Plumb, R., Reiner, E. J., Yeung, L. W. Y. & Ericson Jogsten, I. (2020). Liquid chromatography-ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometry for analysis of pollutants in indoor dust: Identification and predictive capabilities. Analytica Chimica Acta, 1125, 29-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liquid chromatography-ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometry for analysis of pollutants in indoor dust: Identification and predictive capabilities
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2020 (English)In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1125, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dust analysis provides a means to assess the degree of exposure of humans in an indoor environment to various contaminant classes such as flame retardants, pesticides and others. There is increasing interest in non-targeted acquisitions using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to better capture the contaminant profile. However, these studies are confronted with the challenge of assessing confidence in proposed identifications, particularly when authentic standards are not available. Here, we demonstrate the analysis of dust extracts representing various indoor environments (industrial e-waste processing and domestic) for high-abundance environmental contaminants using a data-independent LC-HRMS approach, incorporating ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to provide additional characterization capability for the complex samples. Twenty-nine xenobiotic compound identifications were made based on both targeted and non-targeted processing approaches using accurate mass precursor and product ion measurement combined with an ion mobility derived collision-cross section (TWCCSN2) determination. Characterization of the repeatability of TWCCSN2 value measurements and their average relative error to compared authentic standards of 0.38% were consistent with various published studies and represent a robust measurement property. TWCCSN2 values were particularly useful in cases where confirmation after the initial dust analysis was performed using a different chromatographic method, due to the gas-phase measurement being unaffected by such changes. Observed compound TWCCSN2 values were then compared to predicted CCSN2 values obtained using two different machine-learning based predictive techniques. Results from one of the predictive programs indicates a promising avenue for use of these models for supporting compound identification in non-targeted analyses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Collisioncross section, Data independent acquisition, High resolution mass spectrometry, Liquid chromatography, Non-targeted screening, Travelling-wave ion mobility, Chromatographic analysis, Dust, Electronic Waste, Flame retardants, Gas chromatography, Ions, Mass spectrometry, Phase measurement, Average relative error, Chromatographic methods, Collision cross sections, Environmental contaminant, Gas-phase measurement, Ion mobility spectrometry, Predictive capabilities, Ion chromatography
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-83070 (URN)10.1016/j.aca.2020.05.052 (DOI)000565870900004 ()32674776 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85085739828 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-10 Created: 2020-09-10 Last updated: 2020-09-22Bibliographically approved
Mullin, L. G., Katz, D. R., Riddell, N., Plumb, R., Burgess, J. A., Yeung, L. W. Y. & Ericson Jogsten, I. (2019). Analysis of hexafluoropropylene oxide-dimer acid (HFPO-DA) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS): Review of current approaches and environmental levels. TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, 118, 828-839
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of hexafluoropropylene oxide-dimer acid (HFPO-DA) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS): Review of current approaches and environmental levels
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2019 (English)In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 118, p. 828-839Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emerging per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFAS) compounds are of increasing interest for environmental monitoring, one being hexafluoropropylene oxide-dimer acid (HFPO-DA), commonly referred to as GenX. The following review describes existing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods used to analyse HFPO-DA, including sample preparation and method sensitivity relative to other PFAS. Analytical challenges are also described, in particular the significant formation of in-source fragmentation, dimer and dimer adducts which detract from [M-H](-) signal. Lastly, detected levels of HFPO-DA in environmental and biological samples are compared across the limited number of available field exposure studies, which found several mu g/L concentrations in water samples taken near fluorochemical plant discharges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
HFPO-DA, GenX, Negative polarity electrospray ionisation, Liquid chromatography, Mass spectrometry
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76970 (URN)10.1016/j.trac.2019.05.015 (DOI)000486383900064 ()31501636 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069711596 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Intramural EPA  EPA999999

Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Stylianou, M., Björnsdotter, M., Olsson, P.-E., Ericson Jogsten, I. & Jass, J. (2019). Distinct transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans to different exposure routes of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid. Environmental Research, 168, 406-413
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans to different exposure routes of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 168, p. 406-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although people are exposed daily to per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs), the biological consequences are poorly explored. The health risks associated with PFAS exposure are currently based on chemical analysis with a weak correlation to potential harmful effects in man and animals. In this study, we show that perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), often the most enriched PFAS in the environment, can be transferred via bacteria to higher organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans nematodes were exposed to PFOS directly in buffer or by feeding on bacteria pretreated with PFOS, and this led to distinct gene expression profiles. Specifically, heavy metal and heat shock associated genes were significantly, although inversely, expressed following the different PFOS exposures. The innate immunity receptor for microbial pathogens, clec-60, was shown for the first time to be down-regulated by PFOS. This is in line with a previous study indicating that PFOS is associated with children's susceptibility to certain infectious diseases. Furthermore, bar-1, a gene associated with various cancers was highly up-regulated only when C. elegans were exposed to PFOS pretreated live bacteria. Furthermore, dead bacterial biomass had higher binding capacity for linear and isomeric PFOS than live bacteria, which correlated to the higher levels of PFOS detected in C. elegans when fed the treated E. toll, respectively. These results reveal new aspects concerning trophic chain transport of PFOS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
PFOS biosorption, PFOS isomers, Nematode, Escherichia coli, Food chain
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71130 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2018.10.019 (DOI)000452938700043 ()30388497 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055720038 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20140180
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University

Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Ericson Jogsten, I. (2019). Potential of low-cost alternatives for remediation of PFAS contaminated waters. In: : . Paper presented at 39t International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants (Dioxin 2019), Kyoto, Japan, August 25-30, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential of low-cost alternatives for remediation of PFAS contaminated waters
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103861 (URN)
Conference
39t International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants (Dioxin 2019), Kyoto, Japan, August 25-30, 2019
Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2023-02-01Bibliographically approved
Björnsdotter, M., Yeung, L. W. Y., Kärrman, A. & Ericson Jogsten, I. (2019). Ultra-Short-Chain Perfluoroalkyl Acids Including Trifluoromethane Sulfonic Acid in Water Connected to Known and Suspected Point Sources in Sweden. Environmental Science and Technology, 53(19), 11093-11101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultra-Short-Chain Perfluoroalkyl Acids Including Trifluoromethane Sulfonic Acid in Water Connected to Known and Suspected Point Sources in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 19, p. 11093-11101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Data presenting the environmental occurrence of ultra-short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are scarce and little is known about the potential sources. In this study, ultra-short-chain PFAAs were analyzed in water connected to potential point sources using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Samples (n = 34) were collected in connection with firefighting training sites, landfills, and a hazardous waste management facility. Ultra-short-chain PFAAs were detected in all samples at concentrations up to 84 000 ng/L (∑C1-C3), representing up to 69% of the concentration of 29 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), perfluoropropanoic acid (PFPrA), trifluoromethane sulfonic acid (TFMS), perfluoroethane sulfonic acid (PFEtS), and perfluoropropane sulfonic acid (PFPrS) were detected at concentrations up to 14 000, 53 000, 940, 1700, and 15 000 ng/L, respectively. Principal component analysis suggests that TFA is associated with landfills. PFPrS was associated with samples collected close to the source at all types of sites included in this study. These findings reveal the presence of high concentrations of ultra-short-chain PFAAs released into the environment from various sources and emphasize the large fraction of ultra-short-chain PFAAs to the total concentration of PFASs in water.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76642 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.9b02211 (DOI)000488993500006 ()31496234 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072791157 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01284Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-16-030 2219-17-012Knowledge Foundation, 20160019
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2022-02-03Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6330-789X

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