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Rijk, I. J. J. & Ekblad, A. (2020). Carbon and nitrogen cycling in a lead polluted grassland evaluated using stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and microbial, plant and soil parameters. Plant and Soil, 449(1-2), 249-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon and nitrogen cycling in a lead polluted grassland evaluated using stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and microbial, plant and soil parameters
2020 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 449, no 1-2, p. 249-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling are key ecosystem functions potentially altered by heavy metal pollution. We used an ecosystem approach to study the long-term effect of lead (Pb) on C and N cycles in a natural grassland in a former shooting range.

Methods: Microbial activity was evaluated by substrate-induced respiration (SIR) in situ, adding isotopically labelled C4-sugar to the soil. C and N contents and natural abundance of isotopes were measured in grass leaves, soil and microbial biomass together with root biomass.

Results: A reduced microbial activity and microbial biomass per area, together with a higher soil C stock and C:N ratio suggested a lower microbial decomposition in high Pb compared to low Pb areas. A more closed N cycle in the high Pb area was indicated by 2–3‰ lower δ15N in leaves and soil compared to low Pb areas. Higher δ13C in leaves and higher root biomass but similar leaf nutrient contents indicated plant responses and adaptions to the high Pb. Conclusions: The applied ecosystem approach revealed that Pb slowed down the C and N cycles, possibly by indirect effects rather than by direct toxicity. The ecosystem seems to have adapted to altered conditions. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2020
Keywords
Ecological risk assessment, Field studies, Heavy metal contamination, Soil microbial respiration, Soil nutrient cycling, Stable isotopes, carbon cycle, carbon isotope, decomposition, ecosystem approach, ecosystem function, grassland, lead, microbial activity, nitrogen cycle, nitrogen isotope, soil pollution, stable isotope
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-81647 (URN)10.1007/s11104-020-04467-7 (DOI)000528829400017 ()2-s2.0-85082651737 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-08 Created: 2020-05-08 Last updated: 2020-05-12Bibliographically approved
Misra, S., Das, S. K., Varma, A. K., Mani, D., Kalpana, M. S., Ekblad, A. & Biswas, S. (2020). Multi-proxy approach on the hydrocarbon generation perspective of Barjora Basin, India. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 112, Article ID UNSP 104108.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-proxy approach on the hydrocarbon generation perspective of Barjora Basin, India
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2020 (English)In: Marine and Petroleum Geology, ISSN 0264-8172, E-ISSN 1873-4073, Vol. 112, article id UNSP 104108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Barjora Basin in India is a small basin characterized by a high organic richness of early mature nature. The present study aims to find the source of organic matter (OM) and hydrocarbon generation potential of Barjora Basin. Systematically collected coal and shale samples from R-II seam of the basin were used for proximate and ultimate analyses, Rock Eval pyrolysis along with total organic carbon (TOC) content, organo-micropetrographic framework, thermal maturity, carbon isotopic signature, biomarker composition, functional group studies and estimation of relative aliphaticity and aromaticity through Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The novelty of the present work lies in the application of multiple proxies such as stable isotope ratio of organic carbon (delta C-13), biomarker signatures, thermal maturity parameters, organo-micropetrography and estimation and quantification of functional groups for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction and to assess the hydrocarbon productivity of the basin. A dominant terrestrial OM input in Barjora Basin is indicated by the TOC to total nitrogen ratio (C/N), delta C-13 and biomarker compositions. High gelification index (GI), tissue preservation index (TPI), and carbon preference index (CPI) values indicate that coals are deposited in wet swamp forest regime under high rainwater conditions and shales are formed in upper delta plain regime under high groundwater activity. In addition, large liptinite content, TPI and GI designate short transportation of the OM before burial leading to organic richness of the Barjora Basin. Moreover, high liptinite content, type II-III admixed kerogen input, S-2/S-3 ratio, TPI and index for hydrocarbon generation (I-HG) signify higher potential of the basin for hydrocarbon generation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Stable isotope, Biomarker, Rock Eval pyrolysis, Organo-micropetrographic constituents, Hydrocarbon generation potential, Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, Gondwana organic sediments, Barjora Basin India
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79880 (URN)10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2019.104108 (DOI)000509622600052 ()2-s2.0-85074375222 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Department of Science and Technology (DST), Government of West Bengal, India 173(Sanc.)/ST/P/ST/10G-23/2017

Department of Science & Technology (India) SR/FST/ES II 014/2012 (C)

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Hagenbo, A., Hadden, D., Clemmensen, K. E., Grelle, A., Manzoni, S., Mölder, M., . . . Fransson, P. (2019). Carbon use efficiency of mycorrhizal fungal mycelium increases during the growing season but decreases with forest age across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence. Journal of Ecology, 107(6), 2808-2822
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon use efficiency of mycorrhizal fungal mycelium increases during the growing season but decreases with forest age across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 107, no 6, p. 2808-2822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In boreal forest soils, mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi is pivotal for regulating soil carbon (C) cycling and storage. The carbon use efficiency (CUE), a key parameter in C cycling models, can inform on the partitioning of C between microbial biomass, and potential soil storage, and respiration. Here, we test the dependency of mycorrhizal mycelial CUE on stand age and seasonality in managed boreal forest stands.

Based on mycelial production and respiration estimates, derived from sequentially incubated ingrowth mesh bags, we estimated CUE on an ecosystem scale during a seasonal cycle and across a chronosequence of eight, 12- to 158-year-old, managed Pinus sylvestris forest stands characterized by decreasing pH and nitrogen (N) availability with increasing age. Mycelial respiration was related to total soil respiration, and by using eddy covariance flux measurements, primary production (GPP) was estimated in the 12- and 100-year-old forests, and related to mycelial respiration and CUE.

As hypothesized, mycelial CUE decreased significantly with increasing forest age by c. 65%, supposedly related to a shift in mycorrhizal community composition and a metabolic adjustment reducing their own biomass N demand with declining soil N availability. Furthermore, mycelial CUE increased by a factor of five over the growing season; from 0.03 in May to 0.15 in November, and we propose that the seasonal change in CUE is regulated by a decrease in photosynthate production and temperature. The respiratory contribution of mycorrhizal mycelium ranged from 14% to 26% of total soil respiration, and was on average 17% across all sites and occasions.

Synthesis. Carbon is retained more efficiently in mycorrhizal mycelium late in the growing season, when fungi have access to a more balanced C and nutrient supplies. Earlier in the growing season, at maximum host plant photosynthesis, when below-ground C availability is high in relation to N, the fungi respire excess C resulting in lower mycelial carbon use efficiency (CUE). Additionally, C is retained less efficiently in mycorrhizal fungal biomass in older forest stands characterized by more nutrient depleted soils than younger forest stands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
boreal, carbon use efficiency, chronosequence, ectomycorrhizal, extraradical mycelium, mycelial biomass, mycelial respiration, soil respiration
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77657 (URN)10.1111/1365-2745.13209 (DOI)000491025800024 ()2-s2.0-85067874959 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Ekblad, A. & Bastviken, D. (2019). Deforestation releases old carbon. Nature Geoscience, 12(7), 499-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deforestation releases old carbon
2019 (English)In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 499-500Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75211 (URN)10.1038/s41561-019-0394-7 (DOI)000473104300003 ()
Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
Baskaran, P., Ekblad, A., Soucémarianadin, L. N., Hyvönen, R., Schleucher, J. & Lindahl, B. D. (2019). Nitrogen dynamics of decomposing Scots pine needle litter depends on colonizing fungal species. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 95(6), Article ID fiz059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nitrogen dynamics of decomposing Scots pine needle litter depends on colonizing fungal species
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2019 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 95, no 6, article id fiz059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In boreal ecosystems plant production is often limited by low availability of nitrogen. Nitrogen retention in below-ground organic pools plays an important role in restricting recirculation to plants and thereby hampers forest production. Saprotrophic fungi are commonly assigned to different decomposer strategies, but how these relate to nitrogen cycling remains to be understood. Decomposition of Scots pine needle litter was studied in axenic microcosms with the ligninolytic litter decomposing basidiomycete Gymnopus androsaceus or the stress tolerant ascomycete Chalara longipes. Changes in chemical composition were followed by 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and nitrogen dynamics was assessed by the addition of a 15N tracer. Decomposition by C. longipes resulted in nitrogen retention in non-hydrolysable organic matter, enriched in aromatic and alkylic compounds, whereas the ligninolytic G. androsaceus was able to access this pool, counteracting nitrogen retention. Our observations suggest that differences in decomposing strategies between fungal species play an important role in regulating nitrogen retention and release during litter decomposition, implying that fungal community composition may impact nitrogen cycling at the ecosystem level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
13C CP/MAS NMR, 15N tracer, functional guilds, litter decomposition, nitrogen cycling, saprotrophic fungi
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74566 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fiz059 (DOI)000474762800003 ()31069387 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065782720 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1747
Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Kyaschenko, J., Ovaskainen, O., Ekblad, A., Hagenbo, A., Karltun, E., Clemmensen, K. E. & Lindahl, B. D. (2019). Soil fertility in boreal forest relates to root-driven nitrogen retention and carbon sequestration in the mor layer. New Phytologist, 221(3), 1492-1502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soil fertility in boreal forest relates to root-driven nitrogen retention and carbon sequestration in the mor layer
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2019 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 221, no 3, p. 1492-1502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Boreal forest soils retain significant amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in purely organic layers, but the regulation of organic matter turnover and the relative importance of leaf litter and root‐derived inputs are not well understood.

We combined bomb 14C dating of organic matter with stable isotope profiling for Bayesian parameterization of an organic matter sequestration model. C and N dynamics were assessed across annual depth layers (cohorts), together representing 256 yr of organic matter accumulation. Results were related to ecosystem fertility (soil inorganic N, pH and litter C : N).

Root‐derived C was estimated to decompose two to 10 times more slowly than leaf litter, but more rapidly in fertile plots. The amounts of C and N per cohort declined during the initial 20 yr of decomposition, but, in older material, the amount of N per cohort increased, indicating N retention driven by root‐derived C.

The dynamics of root‐derived inputs were more important than leaf litter dynamics in regulating the variation in organic matter accumulation along a forest fertility gradient. N retention in the rooting zone combined with impeded mining for N in less fertile ecosystems provides evidence for a positive feedback between ecosystem fertility and organic matter turnover.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Bayesian inference, bomb C, decomposition, ecosystem fertility, fungal guilds, leaf- and root-derived C, long-term dynamics, stable isotopes
National Category
Soil Science Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69262 (URN)10.1111/nph.15454 (DOI)000459828900031 ()30281792 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054357249 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1747Academy of Finland, 284601, 309581The Research Council of Norway, 223257
Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Weber, M. E., Lantzsch, H., Dekens, P., Das, S. K., Reilly, B. T., Martos, Y. M., . . . Wolfgramm, P. (2018). 200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan - strong response to insolation forcing. Global and Planetary Change, 166, 107-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan - strong response to insolation forcing
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2018 (English)In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 166, p. 107-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a multidisciplinary study to provide the stratigraphic and palaeoclimatic context of monsoonal rainfall dynamics and their responses to orbital forcing for the Bay of Bengal. Using sediment lightness we established an age model at orbital resolution for International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) Core U1452C-1H that covers the last 200 ka in the lower Bengal Fan. The low-resolution delta O-18 of G. sacculifer is consistent with global delta O-18 records, at least for major glacial-to-interglacial transitions. The variability of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and the delta C-13 composition of organic matter indicate the marine origin of organic matter. Marine primary productivity likely increased during insolation minima, indicative for an enhanced NE monsoon during glacials and stadials. Pristine insolation forcing is also documented for wet-bulk density, red green color variability, and grain-size variations, indicating that darker and coarser-grained material deposited at higher sedimentation rates during insolation minima. Stronger NE monsoon likely amplified ocean-atmosphere interactions over the Indian Ocean, leading to stronger upwelling through shoaling the thermocline, and higher delivery of sediment to the Bay of Bengal due to higher soil erosion on land. In addition, lower glacial and stadial sea levels as well as stronger westward surface circulation favored delivery of coarser-grained fluvial material to the lower Bengal Fan. At the same time the stronger NE monsoon might have increased the aeolian supply. Total inorganic carbon, the Ca/Ti ratio, and biogenic silica vary dominantly on obliquity frequencies, suggesting mobilization and transport of lithogenic material primarily during lowered sea levels and/or higher influence of the Northern Hemisphere westerlies on the dust transport from the Tibetan Plateau. The close resemblance of sediment lightness and the climate record of Antarctic ice cores over multiple glacial cycles indicate close relationship between high southern latitude and tropical Asian climate through shifts in position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The Bengal Fan monsoonal record shows very clear and strict responses to insolation forcing in the lower part from -200 ka to the Younger Toba Tuff during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7 - 5, and less distinct response patterns after deposition of the ash during MIS 4- 2, consistent with low-amplitude changes in insolation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68035 (URN)10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.04.003 (DOI)000435624000009 ()2-s2.0-85047249754 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Deutsche Forschungsgemein-schaft (DFG -Priority Programme 527)  We2039/14-1 

United States Science Support Program Post Expedition Awards  T354A11  CA OCE-0652315 

California State University Council on Ocean Affairs, Science and Technology (CSU-COAST)  

UGC  NCAOR/IODP/20.15/15(III) 

IODP-India grant  NCAOR/IODP/20.15/15(III) 

Oregon ARCS Foundation 

Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved
Vowles, T., Lindwall, F., Ekblad, A., Bahram, M., Furneaux, B. R., Ryberg, M. & Björk, R. G. (2018). Complex effects of mammalian grazing on extramatrical mycelial biomass in the Scandes forest-tundra ecotone. Ecology and Evolution, 8(2), 1019-1030
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex effects of mammalian grazing on extramatrical mycelial biomass in the Scandes forest-tundra ecotone
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2018 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 1019-1030Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mycorrhizal associations are widespread in high-latitude ecosystems and are potentially of great importance for global carbon dynamics. Although large herbivores play a key part in shaping subarctic plant communities, their impact on mycorrhizal dynamics is largely unknown. We measured extramatrical mycelial (EMM) biomass during one growing season in 16-year-old herbivore exclosures and unenclosed control plots (ambient), at three mountain birch forests and two shrub heath sites, in the Scandes forest-tundra ecotone. We also used high-throughput amplicon sequencing for taxonomic identification to investigate differences in fungal species composition. At the birch forest sites, EMM biomass was significantly higher in exclosures (1.36 +/- 0.43g C/m(2)) than in ambient conditions (0.66 +/- 0.17g C/m(2)) and was positively influenced by soil thawing degree-days. At the shrub heath sites, there was no significant effect on EMM biomass (exclosures: 0.72 +/- 0.09g C/m(2); ambient plots: 1.43 +/- 0.94). However, EMM biomass was negatively related to Betula nana abundance, which was greater in exclosures, suggesting that grazing affected EMM biomass positively. We found no significant treatment effects on fungal diversity but the most abundant ectomycorrhizal lineage/cortinarius, showed a near-significant positive effect of herbivore exclusion (p=.08), indicating that herbivory also affects fungal community composition. These results suggest that herbivory can influence fungal biomass in highly context-dependent ways in subarctic ecosystems. Considering the importance of root-associated fungi for ecosystem carbon balance, these findings could have far-reaching implications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Betula nana, Betula pubescens subsp, czerepanovii, ectomycorrhiza, extramatrical mycelia, herbivory, mountain birch forest, shrub heath
National Category
Environmental Sciences Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65647 (URN)10.1002/ece3.3657 (DOI)000425822800019 ()29375775 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038005177 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Eesti Teadusfondi  PUT1317 

Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning 214-2010-1411

Available from: 2018-03-12 Created: 2018-03-12 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Sterkenburg, E., Clemmensen, K. E., Ekblad, A., Finlay, R. D. & Lindahl, B. D. (2018). Contrasting effects of ectomycorrhizal fungi on early and late stage decomposition in a boreal forest. The ISME Journal, 12(9), 2187-2197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting effects of ectomycorrhizal fungi on early and late stage decomposition in a boreal forest
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2018 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2187-2197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi have received increasing attention as regulators of below-ground organic matter storage. They are proposed to promote organic matter accumulation by suppressing saprotrophs, but have also been suggested to play an active role in decomposition themselves. Here we show that exclusion of tree roots and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi in a boreal forest increased decomposition of surface litter by 11% by alleviating nitrogen limitation of saprotrophs-a "Gadgil effect". At the same time, root exclusion decreased Mn-peroxidase activity in the deeper mor layer by 91%. Our results show that ectomycorrhizal fungi may hamper short-term litter decomposition, but also support a crucial role of ectomycorrhizal fungi in driving long-term organic matter oxidation. These observations stress the importance of ectomycorrhizal fungi in regulation of below-ground organic matter accumulation. By different mechanisms they may either hamper or stimulate decomposition, depending upon stage of decomposition and location in the soil profile.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Soil Science Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67218 (URN)10.1038/s41396-018-0181-2 (DOI)000441581700008 ()29880913 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048073238 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2007-1365 2011-1747
Available from: 2018-06-11 Created: 2018-06-11 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
Hagenbo, A., Clemmensen, K. E., Finlay, R. D., Kyaschenko, J., Lindahl, B. D., Fransson, P. & Ekblad, A. (2017). Changes in turnover rather than production regulate biomass of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence. New Phytologist, 214(1), 424-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in turnover rather than production regulate biomass of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence
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2017 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 214, no 1, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In boreal forest soils, ectomycorrhizal fungi are fundamentally important for carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient cycling. Although their extraradical mycelium (ERM) is pivotal for processes such as soil organic matter build-up and nitrogen cycling, very little is known about its dynamics and regulation.

In this study, we quantified ERM production and turnover, and examined how these two processes together regulated standing ERM biomass in seven sites forming a chronosequence of 12- to 100-yr-old managed Pinus sylvestris forests. This was done by determining ERM biomass, using ergosterol as a proxy, in sequentially harvested in-growth mesh bags and by applying mathematical models.

Although ERM production declined with increasing forest age from 1.2 to 0.5 kg ha(-1)  d(-1) , the standing biomass increased from 50 to 112 kg ha(-1) . This was explained by a drastic decline in mycelial turnover from seven times to one time per year with increasing forest age, corresponding to mean residence times from 25 d up to 1 yr.

Our results demonstrate that ERM turnover is the main factor regulating biomass across differently aged forest stands. Explicit inclusion of ERM parameters in forest ecosystem C models may significantly improve their capacity to predict responses of mycorrhiza-mediated processes to management and environmental changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
chronosequence, ectomycorrhiza, ergosterol, extramatrical mycelium, extraradical mycelium, fungal biomass, production, turnover
National Category
Forest Science
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57414 (URN)10.1111/nph.14379 (DOI)000398130300038 ()27997034 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007380512 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, grant no 2011-1747

Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4384-5014

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