oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Rasmussen, Joel
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Rasmussen, J. (2017). Recent research on the discursive construction of national identity  . Journal of Multicultural Discourses, 12(2), 181-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recent research on the discursive construction of national identity 
2017 (English)In: Journal of Multicultural Discourses, ISSN 1744-7143, E-ISSN 1747-6615, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57854 (URN)10.1080/17447143.2017.1303103 (DOI)000403398600007 ()2-s2.0-85015631177 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. & Ihlen, Ø. (2017). Risk, crisis, and social media: A systematic review of seven years' research. Nordicom Review, 38(2), 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk, crisis, and social media: A systematic review of seven years' research
2017 (English)In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast, and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 200 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media platforms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large proportion of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached through social media, and the effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. This article suggests that more attention is given to the questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2017
Keywords
social media, risk communication, crisis communication, research review, research trends, digital divide, geographical focus, social media choice, social media users
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57973 (URN)10.1515/nor-2017-0393 (DOI)000423925000001 ()2-s2.0-85036666231 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Council of Norway and its programme Societal Security (SAMRISK II) 

Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2017). ‘Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better late than never’: Communication professionals’ views of social media humour and implications for organizational identity. Discourse & Communication, 11(1), 89-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better late than never’: Communication professionals’ views of social media humour and implications for organizational identity
2017 (English)In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Public authorities have traditionally used an official language style in public, but currently social media have become an outlet for humour. This article uses positioning analysis to discuss challenges that use of humour poses for the identity of public organizations. Drawing on interviews with communications professionals working in the emergency services sector, the article suggests six evaluative themes that factor into organizational identity construction, such as the frequency and type of humour in social media posts. Indeed, while humour helps fashion more flexible and risk-taking organizational identities, it can also stand contrary to a bureaucratic ethos of public servantship and equal treatment. Dilemmas thus arise for public authorities that seek to adjust to the times and still remain ‘in character’. The article contributes to organizational identity research by considering the hitherto overlooked immersion of social media use, humour and organizational identity formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Communication professionals, discourse, humour, organizational identity, positioning analysis, public authorities, social media
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55997 (URN)10.1177/1750481316683295 (DOI)000394757500005 ()2-s2.0-85011565061 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Council of Norway and its programme Societal Security (SAMRISK II)

Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2018-02-01Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2016). Doing “Being” Responsible Risk Communicators at Work. In: : . Paper presented at The 66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communicating with Power, Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doing “Being” Responsible Risk Communicators at Work
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

While previous research has demonstrated that an increasing burden of responsibility is placed on employees for the risks and health problems they face, less attention has been paid to the increased communication requirements this development involves. Bridging this gap, this article investigates how social interaction is used by employees and chair to negotiate employees becoming responsible risk communication subjects. Using positioning analysis (Bamberg 2005), the study examines five safety meeting episodes, and demonstrates how the responsibilization of employees’ risk communication extends questions of a) form – such as the duration of talk, b) paper-work, c) genuineness, d) contributing on-topic, e) economization, and f) reliability regardless of illness and place. The study contributes to research on both workplace meetings and changes in workplace communication.

National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53539 (URN)
Conference
The 66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communicating with Power, Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2016). Governing safe operations at a distance: Enacting responsible risk communication at work. In: P. McIlvenny, J. Zhukova Klausen & L. Bang Lindegaard (Ed.), Studies of Discourse and Governmentality: New Perspectives and Methods (pp. 179-207). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing safe operations at a distance: Enacting responsible risk communication at work
2016 (English)In: Studies of Discourse and Governmentality: New Perspectives and Methods / [ed] P. McIlvenny, J. Zhukova Klausen & L. Bang Lindegaard, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 179-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter argues that today's organizational risk management, where employees are to adopt routines for proper self-control, is fruitfully approached as what Rose and Miller (1992) term governing-at-a-distance. Governing that relies on internal control and the self-governing capacity of citizens requires people to be involved in communication that signifies responsible behaviour. If there is hierarchical monitoring, then it is communication that is supervised which makes the signifying practices all the more important. While previous research has demonstrated that an increasing burden of responsibility is placed on citizens for the risks and health problems they face or envisage, less attention has been paid to the increased communication requirements this development involves. Bridging this gap, this chapter investigates how social interaction in meetings works to facilitate employees to become responsible risk communication subjects. An intensive discourse analysis of five safety meeting episodes demonstrates how the responsibilization of employees’ risk communication extends questions of a) form – such as the duration of talk, b) paper work, c) genuineness, d) contributing on-topic, e) economization, and f) reliability regardless of illness and place. The study takes inspiration from positioning analysis (e.g. Bamberg, 2005), allowing for a detailed account of the moment-to-moment process of responsibilization, something that previous research on risk management tends to skim over.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016
Series
Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture., ISSN 1569-9463 ; 66
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52005 (URN)10.1075/dapsac.66.06ras (DOI)9789027206572 (ISBN)9789027267146 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-09-06 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2016). “Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better Late Than Never”: Communication Professionals’ Views of Social Media Humor and Implications for Organizational Identity. In: : . Paper presented at The 66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communicating with Power, Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better Late Than Never”: Communication Professionals’ Views of Social Media Humor and Implications for Organizational Identity
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Security and emergency authorities have traditionally used an official language style in public, but currently social media have become an outlet for informal posts and humor. This article uses positioning analysis (Bamberg, 2005) to discuss the challenges that uses of humor pose for the identity of public officials and organizations. Four dimensions of social media use and humor are suggested to factor into organizational identity construction. Particularly some forms of humor stands contrary to a bureaucratic ethos of impartiality and confidentiality. Thus, dilemmas arise for public authorities that want to remain “in character”. The article contributes to the literature on organizational identity by considering the hitherto overlooked immersion of the use of social media and humor with organizational identity formation.

National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53540 (URN)
Conference
The 66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communicating with Power, Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. & Ihlen, Ø. (2015). Lessons from Norwegian emergency authorities’ use of social media. Oslo: PRIO
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from Norwegian emergency authorities’ use of social media
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Social media has evolved along with expectations that organizations, including public authorities, would create more dialogue with citizens. This policy brief argues for, first, the importance for public authorities to listen to, follow up on and use social media users’ responses and viewpoints to facilitate dialogue and organizational learning, and, second, the need to more systematically reflect on the causes, meaning, and consequences of the informal tone that some public authorities have come to use in social media.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: PRIO, 2015. p. 4
Series
PRIO Policy Brief ; 14
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52007 (URN)978-82-7288-641-6 (ISBN)978-82-7288-640-9 (ISBN)
Projects
DIGICOM
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-09-06 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. & Ihlen, Ø. (2015). Risk, Crisis and Social Media: A Meta-Study of Six Years' Research. In: : . Paper presented at The 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communication Across the Life Span, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21-25, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk, Crisis and Social Media: A Meta-Study of Six Years' Research
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 108 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media plat­forms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large part of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached though social media and effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. The paper suggests more attention is given questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity.

National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53541 (URN)
Conference
The 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Communication Across the Life Span, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21-25, 2015
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2015). “Should each of us take over the role as watcher?”: Attitudes on Twitter toward the 2014 Norwegian terror alert. Journal of Multicultural Discourses, 10(2), 197-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Should each of us take over the role as watcher?”: Attitudes on Twitter toward the 2014 Norwegian terror alert
2015 (English)In: Journal of Multicultural Discourses, ISSN 1744-7143, E-ISSN 1747-6615, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
Security/securitization, terror alerts, discursive psychology, attitudes, social media, Twitter
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40250 (URN)10.1080/17447143.2015.1042882 (DOI)000214179000004 ()
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, J. (2015). The challenge of improving the public representation of mental illness: a case study of crime reporting and a call for radical change. In: Enric Ordeix, Valérie Carayol, Ralph Tench (Ed.), Public relations, values and cultural identity: (pp. 181-197). Bruxelles, Belgium: Peter Lang Publishing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenge of improving the public representation of mental illness: a case study of crime reporting and a call for radical change
2015 (English)In: Public relations, values and cultural identity / [ed] Enric Ordeix, Valérie Carayol, Ralph Tench, Bruxelles, Belgium: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 181-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bruxelles, Belgium: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47814 (URN)978-2-87574-251-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications