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Mosleh, M., Dalal, K. & Aljeesh, Y. (2018). Burden of chronic diseases in the Palestinian health-care sector using disability-adjusted life-years. Paper presented at 7th Lancet-Palestinian-Health-Alliance (LPHA) Conference, Amman, Jordan, March 7-8, 2016. The Lancet, 391(Suppl. 1), 21-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burden of chronic diseases in the Palestinian health-care sector using disability-adjusted life-years
2018 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 391, no Suppl. 1, p. 21-21Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic diseases are the greatest public health concern worldwide, contribute to a large burden of disease in the developed world, and are increasing rapidly in prevalence in developing countries. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of reported chronic diseases in the occupied Palestinian territory.

Methods: We used the global burden of disease (GBD) approach and its templates to quantify disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). To estimate years of life lost, we used mortality data from Ministry of Health materials, and we used local morbidity data from the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (heath survey 2010) to estimate years lived with disability. The study was approved by the Palestinian Health Research Council.

Findings: In 2010, DALYS lost due to selected chronic diseases were estimated as 60 per 1000 DALYs in the West Bank and 57 per 1000 DALYs in Gaza Strip, with each DALY defined as 1 year of optimum healthy life lost. Ischaemic heart disease and hypertension contributed the highest proportion of DALYs in men and women in 2010, followed by lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. Respiratory disease also contributed a high proportion of DALYs, with a small difference in rank between the Gaza Strip and West Bank. Cancer was ranked the third largest contributor and respiratory disease the fourth largest contributor to DALYs in the Gaza Strip, whereas respiratory disease was the third and cancer the fourth largest contributors to DALYs in the West Bank. We also found differences by sex and region. Heart disease and cancer continued to rank highly as causes of years of life lost in the West Bank and Gaza Strip for both sexes in 2010, indicating the major causes of chronic disease burden in the occupied Palestinian territory in 2010.

Interpretation: The burden of chronic disease is increasing substantially in the occupied Palestinian territory, and interventions are needed to tackle these burdens. Further studies using recent data and increasing attention to chronic non-communicable diseases are needed in the occupied Palestinian territories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65809 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30346-5 (DOI)000426471900022 ()
Conference
7th Lancet-Palestinian-Health-Alliance (LPHA) Conference, Amman, Jordan, March 7-8, 2016
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Mosleh, M., Dalal, K., Aljeesh, Y. & Svanström, L. (2018). Correction to: The burden of war-injury in the Palestinian health care sector in Gaza Strip [Letter to the editor]. BMC International Health and Human Rights, 18(1), Article ID 32.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction to: The burden of war-injury in the Palestinian health care sector in Gaza Strip
2018 (English)In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 32Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68505 (URN)10.1186/s12914-018-0171-5 (DOI)000441984400001 ()30103744 (PubMedID)
Note

This corrects the article The burden of war-injury in the Palestinian health care sector in Gaza Strip DOI: 10.1186/s12914-018-0165-3

Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Abdullah, A. S., Dalal, K., Deave, T., Rahman, F. & Mashreky, S. R. (2018). Exploring perceptions of common practices immediately following burn injuries in rural communities of Bangladesh. BMC Health Services Research, 18, Article ID 467.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring perceptions of common practices immediately following burn injuries in rural communities of Bangladesh
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2018 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Burns can be the most devastating injuries in the world, they constitute a global public health problem and cause widespread public health concern. Every year in Bangladesh more than 365,000 people are injured by electrical, thermal and other causes of burn injuries. Among them 27,000 need hospital admission and over 5600 people die. Immediate treatment and medication has been found to be significant in the success of recovering from a burn. However, common practices used in the treatment of burn injuries in the community is not well documented in Bangladesh. This study was designed to explore the perception of local communities in Bangladesh the common practices used and health-seeking behaviors sought immediately after a burn injury has occurred.

Methods: A qualitative study was conducted using Focus Group Discussions (FGD) as the data collection method. Six unions of three districts in rural Bangladesh were randomly selected and FGDs were conducted in these districts with six burn survivors and their relatives and neighbours. Data were analyzed manually, codes were identified and the grouped into themes.

Results: The participants stated that burn injuries are common during the winter in Bangladesh. Inhabitants in the rural areas said that it was common practice, and correct, to apply the following to the injured area immediately after a burn: egg albumin, salty water, toothpaste, kerosene, coconut oil, cow dung or soil. Some also believed that applying water is harmful to a burn injury. Most participants did not know about any referral system for burn patients. They expressed their dissatisfaction about the lack of available health service facilities at the recommended health care centers at both the district level and above.

Conclusions: In rural Bangladesh, the current first-aid practices for burn injuries are incorrect; there is a widely held belief that using water on burns is harmful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Perceptions, Rural community, Burn injury, Bangladesh
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68046 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-3287-3 (DOI)000435487400009 ()29914495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048719843 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Bangladesh Medical Research Council, Bangladesh

Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved
Tinnfält, A., Fröding, K., Larsson, M. & Dalal, K. (2018). "I Feel It In My Heart When My Parents Fight": Experiences of 7-9-Year-Old Children of Alcoholics. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 35(5), 531-540
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I Feel It In My Heart When My Parents Fight": Experiences of 7-9-Year-Old Children of Alcoholics
2018 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 531-540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children are vulnerable when exposed to parental alcohol abuse. Although much is known about children of alcoholics (COA), research examining the experiences of younger COA is scarce. To gain knowledge of the consequences for these children, it is important to ask the children themselves. This study explored the consequences for a child of having an alcoholic parent, from the point of view of 7-9-year-old COA. Eighteen children were interviewed, whose alcoholic parent was undergoing treatment, using a vignette. In the analysis, using qualitative content analysis, the findings show that the children of this young age had much experiences and took a great responsibility for their alcoholic parent, and the family. The most significant feeling of the children was a feeling of sadness. They tried to control the situation in different ways. They wished for a change in the future, but despite problems in the family they described things they did together with a loving parent. Implications include the importance of listening to and supporting all COA, also children as young as 7-9 years old. Further studies should address the support that can and should be offered to COA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Children of alcoholics, COA, Qualitative study, Parental alcohol abuse, School children, Vignette
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68998 (URN)10.1007/s10560-018-0544-6 (DOI)000444033600008 ()30220781 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045754425 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
GBD 2015, E. M. (2018). Intentional injuries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study. International Journal of Public Health, 63(Suppl. 1), 39-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intentional injuries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 63, no Suppl. 1, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We used GBD 2015 findings to measure the burden of intentional injuries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) between 1990 and 2015.

Methods: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study defines intentional injuries as a combination of self-harm (including suicide), interpersonal violence, collective violence (war), and legal intervention. We estimated number of deaths, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for each type of intentional injuries.

Results: In 2015, 28,695 individuals (95% UI: 25,474-37,832) died from self-harm, 35,626 (95% UI: 20,947-41,857) from interpersonal violence, and 143,858 (95% UI: 63,554-223,092) from collective violence and legal interventions. In 2015, collective violence and legal intervention was the fifth-leading cause of DALYs in the EMR and the leading cause in Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya; they account for 49.7% of total DALYs in Syria.

Conclusions: Our findings call for increased efforts to stabilize the region and assist in rebuilding the health systems, as well as increasing transparency and employing preventive strategies to reduce self-harm and interpersonal injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Birkhäuser Verlag, 2018
Keywords
Intentional injuries, Eastern mediterranean region, Burden of disease
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64884 (URN)10.1007/s00038-017-1005-2 (DOI)000433519400007 ()28776251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026846328 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mosleh, M., Dalal, K., Aljeesh, Y. & Svanström, L. (2018). The burden of war-injury in the Palestinian health care sector in Gaza Strip. BMC International Health and Human Rights, 18, Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The burden of war-injury in the Palestinian health care sector in Gaza Strip
2018 (English)In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 18, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: War-related injury is a major public health concern, and a leading cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries such as Palestine. Little is known about the burden of war-related injury in the Palestinian context. The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence and pattern of injuries, associated with war in Gaza Strip, from July 8 to August 26, 2014.

Methods: This was a descriptive study based on an injury registry at hospital facilities in the Gaza Strip. A total of 420 victims records from 2014 Gaza war injuries were randomly selected, proportionate to the size of the study population estimated across five Gaza governorates. Simple descriptive statistics were calculated to explore the frequency and percentage distribution of study variables and injury data. A chi-square test (X-2) was used. The significance level was derived at p < 0.05. The data were analyzed by IBM SPSS software, version 23.

Results: Males (75.5%) have experienced more war-related injuries than females (24.5%), constituting a male: female ratio of 3.1: 1. Almost half (49.5%) of the injured victims were of the age group 20-39, followed by children and adolescents (< 20 years), accounting for 31.4%. More than half of victims were single (53.6%), 44.3% were married and the rest were widowed or divorced. The overall number of injuries was 6.4 per 1000 population, though it varied among regions. North Gaza reported the highest number of injuries (9.0) and Rafah the lowest (4.7) per 1000 population. Blast and explosion were found to be the most common causes of war injuries (72.9%). The highest proportion of injuries were reported in the upper body. Multiple body shrapnel wounds and burns (39.3%) were most frequent. Other types of injuries were multiple organ injury (24.3%), fractures (13.6%), internal organ injury and bleeding (9.8%), amputation (4.5%), abrasions / lacerations and contusions (4.8%), vision or hearing loss or both (1.9%) and respiratory problems (1.9%). The highest percentage of injuries were classified as mild (46.9%), and the rest ranged from moderate-to-severe. Almost 26% of individuals had sustained disability, and most of them had physical/motor impairment.

Conclusion: War-related injuries constitute a major problem to public health discipline and clinical medicine as well. A better surveillance system using ICD codes, and development of a comprehensive electronic data network are necessary to make future research easier and more timely.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2018
Keywords
War, Injuries, War injuries, Disability, Palestine, Gaza Strip, Gaza war
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68148 (URN)10.1186/s12914-018-0165-3 (DOI)000436815000002 ()29954389 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049172535 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-26 Created: 2018-07-26 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
Mokdad, A. H., Dalal, K. & Murray, C. J. L. (2018). Transport injuries and deaths in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study. International Journal of Public Health, 63(Suppl. 1), 187-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transport injuries and deaths in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 63, no Suppl. 1, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Birkhäuser Verlag, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59075 (URN)10.1007/s00038-017-0987-0 (DOI)000433519400018 ()28776255 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026845393 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-10 Created: 2017-08-10 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Biswas, A., Dalal, K., Deave, T. & Mashreky, S. R. (2017). Burn Injury of a Pregnant Mother in Rural Bangladesh: A Case Report. Health Scope, 6(4), Article ID e63168.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burn Injury of a Pregnant Mother in Rural Bangladesh: A Case Report
2017 (English)In: Health Scope, ISSN 2251-8959, Vol. 6, no 4, article id e63168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This paper describes a case of pregnant mother who died of burn injury in order to understand the societal factors related to the event. We reviewed the case in the rural community. Initially, the case was reported as a maternal death to maternal and neonatal death review (MNDR) system being conducted in Bangladesh within exiting health system to explore the medical and social causes of maternal and newborn deaths. However, during the verbal autopsy, it was found that the mother died of bun injury. Therefore, we performed detailed case study.

Case Presentation: A woman aged 18 years was nine months pregnant in a rural community in Moheskhali upazila of Cox's Bazar district. During the wintertime, themotherfeels coldandgoes near to the oven in the yard to bewarm. Suddenly, part of her clothing (Anchal of Sari) catches fire; she does not recognized and starts to walk towards her room. A neighbor notices and starts to shout. The woman scars and tries to run. The neighbors come with a bucket of water. By this time, the fire spreads over whole body and cloths. Immediately after the event, she is transferred to a medical college hospital.

Conclusions: Doctors tried to do immediate cesarean section; however, they could not save the life of the baby inside. The mother who was severely burnt also died after 10 days. Rural community in Bangladesh still does not have adequate awareness and knowledge about risk of burn. The scarce knowledge of appropriate steps immediately after burn was explored. Moreover, delays in decision-making and transferring the patient to the facility were identified. Specific interventions need to be taken to increase knowledge and awareness in the community, which could save thousands of lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kowsar Publ., 2017
Keywords
Burn Injury, Pregnancy, Prevention, Bangladesh
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65040 (URN)10.5812/jhealthscope.63168 (DOI)000423916900009 ()
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Dieleman, J., Dalal, K. & Murray, C. J. L. (2017). Evolution and patterns of global health financing 1995-2014: development assistance for health, and government, prepaid private, and out-of-pocket health spending in 184 countries. The Lancet, 389(10083), 1981-2004
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution and patterns of global health financing 1995-2014: development assistance for health, and government, prepaid private, and out-of-pocket health spending in 184 countries
2017 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 389, no 10083, p. 1981-2004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: An adequate amount of prepaid resources for health is important to ensure access to health services and for the pursuit of universal health coverage. Previous studies on global health financing have described the relationship between economic development and health financing. In this study, we further explore global health financing trends and examine how the sources of funds used, types of services purchased, and development assistance for health disbursed change with economic development. We also identify countries that deviate from the trends.

Methods: We estimated national health spending by type of care and by source, including development assistance for health, based on a diverse set of data including programme reports, budget data, national estimates, and 964 National Health Accounts. These data represent health spending for 184 countries from 1995 through 2014. We converted these data into a common inflation-adjusted and purchasing power-adjusted currency, and used non-linear regression methods to model the relationship between health financing, time, and economic development.

Findings: Between 1995 and 2014, economic development was positively associated with total health spending and a shift away from a reliance on development assistance and out-of-pocket (OOP) towards government spending. The largest absolute increase in spending was in high-income countries, which increased to purchasing power-adjusted $5221 per capita based on an annual growth rate of 3.0%. The largest health spending growth rates were in upper-middle-income (5.9) and lower-middle-income groups (5.0), which both increased spending at more than 5% per year, and spent $914 and $267 per capita in 2014, respectively. Spending in low-income countries grew nearly as fast, at 4.6%, and health spending increased from $51 to $120 per capita. In 2014, 59.2% of all health spending was financed by the government, although in low-income and lower-middle-income countries, 29.1% and 58.0% of spending was OOP spending and 35.7% and 3.0% of spending was development assistance. Recent growth in development assistance for health has been tepid; between 2010 and 2016, it grew annually at 1.8%, and reached US$37.6 billion in 2016. Nonetheless, there is a great deal of variation revolving around these averages. 29 countries spend at least 50% more than expected per capita, based on their level of economic development alone, whereas 11 countries spend less than 50% their expected amount.

Interpretation: Health spending remains disparate, with low-income and lower-middle-income countries increasing spending in absolute terms the least, and relying heavily on OOP spending and development assistance. Moreover, tremendous variation shows that neither time nor economic development guarantee adequate prepaid health resources, which are vital for the pursuit of universal health coverage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lancet Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
Global Burden of Disease
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57836 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30874-7 (DOI)000401515300023 ()
Note

Funding Agency:

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Dieleman, J. L., Dalal, K. & Murray, C. J. L. (2017). Future and potential spending on health 2015-40: development assistance for health, and government, prepaid private, and out-of-pocket health spending in 184 countries. The Lancet, 389(10083), 2005-2030
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future and potential spending on health 2015-40: development assistance for health, and government, prepaid private, and out-of-pocket health spending in 184 countries
2017 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 389, no 10083, p. 2005-2030Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The amount of resources, particularly prepaid resources, available for health can affect access to health care and health outcomes. Although health spending tends to increase with economic development, tremendous variation exists among health financing systems. Estimates of future spending can be beneficial for policy makers and planners, and can identify financing gaps. In this study, we estimate future gross domestic product (GDP), all-sector government spending, and health spending disaggregated by source, and we compare expected future spending to potential future spending.

Methods: We extracted GDP, government spending in 184 countries from 1980-2015, and health spend data from 1995-2014. We used a series of ensemble models to estimate future GDP, all-sector government spending, development assistance for health, and government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private health spending through 2040. We used frontier analyses to identify patterns exhibited by the countries that dedicate the most funding to health, and used these frontiers to estimate potential health spending for each low-income or middle-income country. All estimates are inflation and purchasing power adjusted.

Findings: We estimated that global spending on health will increase from US$9.21 trillion in 2014 to $24.24 trillion (uncertainty interval [UI] 20.47-29.72) in 2040. We expect per capita health spending to increase fastest in upper-middle-income countries, at 5.3% (UI 4.1-6.8) per year. This growth is driven by continued growth in GDP, government spending, and government health spending. Lower-middle income countries are expected to grow at 4.2% (3.8-4.9). High-income countries are expected to grow at 2.1% (UI 1.8-2.4) and low-income countries are expected to grow at 1.8% (1.0-2.8). Despite this growth, health spending per capita in low-income countries is expected to remain low, at $154 (UI 133-181) per capita in 2030 and $195 (157-258) per capita in 2040. Increases in national health spending to reach the level of the countries who spend the most on health, relative to their level of economic development, would mean $321 (157-258) per capita was available for health in 2040 in low-income countries.

Interpretation: Health spending is associated with economic development but past trends and relationships suggest that spending will remain variable, and low in some low-resource settings. Policy change could lead to increased health spending, although for the poorest countries external support might remain essential.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lancet Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
Global Burden of Disease Health Financing
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57837 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30873-5 (DOI)000401515300024 ()
Note

Funding Agency:

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
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