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Goswami, M., Khan, F. A., Ibrisevic, A., Olsson, P.-E. & Jass, J. (2018). Development of Escherichia coli based gene expression profiling of sewage sludge leachates. Journal of Applied Microbiology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Escherichia coli based gene expression profiling of sewage sludge leachates
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Microbiology, ISSN 1364-5072, E-ISSN 1365-2672Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The impact of municipal waste on pathogenic microorganisms released into the environment is a public health concern. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of sewage sludge and antibiotic contaminants on stress response, virulence and antibiotic resistance in a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

METHODS AND RESULTS: The effects of sewage sludge leachates on uropathogenic E. coli CFT073 were determined by monitoring the expression of 45 genes associated with antibiotic/metal resistance, stress response and virulence using RT-qPCR. The E. coli gene expression was validated using sub-inhibitory concentrations of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. E. coli exposed to sewage sludge or sewage sludge-fly ash leachates altered the expression of 5 antibiotic and metal resistance, 3 stress response and 2 virulence associated genes. When antibiotics were combined with sludge or sludge-fly ash the antibiotic-associated gene expression was altered.

CONCLUSIONS: E. coli treated with two sludge leachates had distinct gene expression patterns that were altered when the sludge leachates were combined with tetracycline, although to a lesser extent with ciprofloxacin.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF STUDY: The E. coli multigene expression analysis is a potential new tool for assessing the effects of pollutants on pathogenic microbes in environmental waters for improved risk assessment. This article is protected by copyright.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Ecotoxicity, Gene expression, Resistance, Sludge, Stress response, Virulence
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67511 (URN)10.1111/jam.14028 (DOI)29928772 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Pradhan, A., Olsson, P.-E. & Jass, J. (2018). Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diethyl phthalate disrupt lipid metabolism, reduce fecundity and shortens lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Chemosphere, 190, 375-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diethyl phthalate disrupt lipid metabolism, reduce fecundity and shortens lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans
2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 190, p. 375-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The widespread use of phthalates is of major concern as they have adverse effects on many different physiological functions, including reproduction, metabolism and cell differentiation. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of the widely-used di (2-ethydlhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) with its substitute, diethyl phthalate (DEP). We analyzed the toxicity of these two phthalates using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. Gene expression analysis following exposure during the L1 to young adult stage showed that DEHP and DEP alter the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and stress response. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, including fasn-1, pod-2, fat-5, acs-6 and sbp-1, and vitellogenin were upregulated. Among the stress response genes, ced-1 wah-1, daf-21 and gst-4 were upregulated, while cd-1, cdf-2 and the heat shock proteins (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.48 and sip-1) were down regulated. Lipid staining revealed that DEHP significantly increased lipid content following 1 mu M exposure, however, DEP required 10 mu M exposure to elicit an effect. Both DEHP and DEP reduced the fecundity at 1 mu M concentration. Lifespan analysis indicated that DEHP and DEP reduced the average lifespan from 14 days in unexposed worms to 13 and 12 days, respectively. Expression of lifespan associated genes showed a correlation to shortened lifespan in the exposed groups. As reported previously, our data also indicates that the banned DEHP is toxic to C. elegans, however its substitute DEP has not been previously tested in this model organism and our data revealed that DEP is equally potent as DEHP in regulating C. elegans physiological functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Plasticizer, Metabolism, Reproduction, Toxicity, Longevity
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62890 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.09.123 (DOI)000414881600041 ()29020644 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030660035 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 201504600Knowledge Foundation, 20140180 20150084
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Junnarkar, M. V., Thakare, P. M., Yewale, P. P., Rahman, A., Jass, J., Mandal, A. & Nawani, N. N. (2018). Evaluation of Probiotic Potential of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Different Sources in Western India. Food biotechnology, 32(2), 112-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Probiotic Potential of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Different Sources in Western India
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2018 (English)In: Food biotechnology, ISSN 0890-5436, E-ISSN 1532-4249, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 112-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lactic acid bacteria isolated from unconventional sources are often attractive targets in the quest for obtaining better probiotics. In the present study, 16 members of the genus Lactobacillus, isolated from 3 different sources in western India, viz., plants, fermented foods and beverages, and human feces, were evaluated for their probiotic and bioactive properties. The isolates were closely related to Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and mainly Lactobacillus plantarum. The isolates were tolerant to bile salt, acidic pH and pancreatin, although pancreatin tolerance was generally low. Cellular extracts of several isolates displayed antioxidant activity, while cell-free supernatants displayed antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Antioxidant activity of Lactobacilli of human origin was higher than those from vegetables or fermented foods and beverages. L. plantarum AG40V prevented spoilage of fresh-cut fruits, vegetables and sprouted mung-beans. Lactobacilli from all sources displayed equal probiotic potential and those of human origin displayed superior antioxidant activity over others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Lactic acid bacteria, probiotics, antibacterial activity, antioxidant activity, comet assay
National Category
Food Science Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68096 (URN)10.1080/08905436.2018.1443825 (DOI)000436080100003 ()2-s2.0-85048930142 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Khan, F. A., Hellmark, B., Ehricht, R., Söderquist, B. & Jass, J. (2018). Related carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella isolates detected in both a hospital and associated aquatic environment in Sweden.. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Related carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella isolates detected in both a hospital and associated aquatic environment in Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Carbapenem antibiotics are one of the last-resort agents against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The occurrence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in wastewater and aquatic environments is an indication of MDR bacteria in the community. This study evaluated CPE in aquatic environments and compared them to the local hospital isolates in Sweden. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses of antibiotic resistance of environmental and clinical CPE were performed. The relatedness of the isolates and possible clonal dissemination was evaluated using phylogenetic and phyloproteomic analysis. Klebsiella oxytoca carrying carbapenemase genes (blaVIM-1, blaIMP-29) were isolated from wastewater and the recipient river, while K. oxytoca (blaVIM-1) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (blaVIM-1, blaOXA-48, blaNDM-1, blaKPC-3) were isolated from patients at the local clinics or hospital. The K. oxytoca classified as sequence type 172 (ST172) isolated from the river was genotypically related to two clinical isolates recovered from patients. The similarity between environmental and clinical isolates suggests the dispersion of blaVIM-1 producing K. oxytoca ST172 from hospital to aquatic environment and the likelihood of its presence in the community. This is the first report of CPE in aquatic environments in Sweden; therefore, surveillance of aquatic and hospital environments for CPE in other urban areas is important to determine the major transfer routes in order to formulate strategies to prevent the spread of MDR bacteria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Antimicrobial resistance, Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Extended spectrum beta-lactamase, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Multidrug resistance
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68676 (URN)10.1007/s10096-018-3365-9 (DOI)30171482 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Pradhan, A., Ivarsson, P., Ragnvaldsson, D., Berg, H., Jass, J. & Olsson, P.-E. (2017). Transcriptional responses of zebrafish to complex metal mixtures in laboratory studies overestimates the responses observed with environmental water. Science of the Total Environment, 584-585, 1138-1146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptional responses of zebrafish to complex metal mixtures in laboratory studies overestimates the responses observed with environmental water
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 584-585, p. 1138-1146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metals released into the environment continue to be of concern for human health. However, risk assessment of metal exposure is often based on total metal levels and usually does not take bioavailability data, metal speciation or matrix effects into consideration. The continued development of biological endpoint analyses are therefore of high importance for improved eco-toxicological risk analyses. While there is an on-going debate concerning synergistic or additive effects of low-level mixed exposures there is little environmental data confirming the observations obtained from laboratory experiments. In the present study we utilized qRT-PCR analysis to identify key metal response genes to develop a method for biomonitoring and risk-assessment of metal pollution. The gene expression patterns were determined for juvenile zebrafish exposed to waters from sites down-stream of a closed mining operation. Genes representing different physiological processes including stress response, inflammation, apoptosis, drug metabolism, ion channels and receptors, and genotoxicity were analyzed. The gene expression patterns of zebrafish exposed to laboratory prepared metal mixes were compared to the patterns obtained with fish exposed to the environmental samples with the same metal composition and concentrations. Exposure to environmental samples resulted in fewer alterations in gene expression compared to laboratory mixes. A biotic ligand model (BLM) was used to approximate the bioavailability of the metals in the environmental setting. However, the BLM results were not in agreement with the experimental data, suggesting that the BLM may be overestimating the risk in the environment. The present study therefore supports the inclusion of site-specific biological analyses to complement the present chemical based assays used for environmental risk-assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Cocktail effect; Synergistic effects; Risk-assessment; Toxicogenetics; Bioavailability; Metal speciation
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55403 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.01.174 (DOI)000399358500112 ()28159303 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85011082322 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 20110183
Note

Funding agencies:

Örebro University J61900

Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Westling, M., Danielsson Tham, M.-L., Jass, J., Nilsen, A., Öström, Å. & Tham, W. (2016). Contribution of Enterobacteriaceae to Sensory Characteristics in Soft Cheeses Made from Raw Milk. Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Predictive Modelling in Food, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 8-12, 2015. Procedia Food Science, 7, 17-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of Enterobacteriaceae to Sensory Characteristics in Soft Cheeses Made from Raw Milk
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2016 (English)In: Procedia Food Science, ISSN 2211-601X, E-ISSN 2211-601X, Vol. 7, p. 17-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbiological and sensory methods were used to analyze 22 soft cheeses, of which 19 were made from raw milk, one was made from both raw and pasteurized milk and two were made from pasteurized milk. Moderate correlations (r-value 0.5–0.6 and p-value <0.01–0.05) were found between the levels of Enterobacteriaceae 37°C and the intensity of the sensory characteristics “bitter”, “metallic”, “pungent”, “manure” and “ammonia”. The present study indicates that it is possible to predict high levels of Enterobacteriaceae in soft cheeses made from raw milk using only the human senses (odor and taste).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Soft cheeses, pasteurization, sensory profile, Enterobacteriaceae, raw milk
National Category
Food Engineering
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51663 (URN)10.1016/j.profoo.2016.02.075 (DOI)000386627900005 ()
Conference
9th International Conference on Predictive Modelling in Food, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 8-12, 2015
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Goswami, M., Subramanian, M., Kumar, R., Jass, J. & Jawali, N. (2016). Involvement of Antibiotic Efflux Machinery in Glutathione-Mediated Decreased Ciprofloxacin Activity in Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 60(7), 4369-4374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Involvement of Antibiotic Efflux Machinery in Glutathione-Mediated Decreased Ciprofloxacin Activity in Escherichia coli
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2016 (English)In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 4369-4374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have analyzed the contribution of different efflux components to glutathione-mediated abrogation of ciprofloxacin's activity in Escherichia coli and the underlying potential mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon. The results indicated that glutathione increased the total active efflux, thereby partially contributing to glutathione-mediated neutralization of ciprofloxacin's antibacterial action in E. coli However, the role of glutathione-mediated increased efflux becomes evident in the absence of a functional TolC-AcrAB efflux pump.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, USA: American Society for Microbiology, 2016
National Category
Microbiology Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51136 (URN)10.1128/AAC.00414-16 (DOI)000378094400063 ()27139480 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84977123217 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Funding Agency:

Internal departmental funds of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Government of India

Available from: 2016-07-01 Created: 2016-07-01 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved
Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Nawani, N. N., Jass, J., Hossain, K., Saud, Z. A., . . . Mandal, A. (2015). Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA. Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, 50(11), 1136-1147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1136-1147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chromium and chromium containing compounds are discharged into the nature as waste from anthropogenic activities, such as industries, agriculture, forest farming, mining and metallurgy. Continued disposal of these compounds to the environment leads to development of various lethal diseases in both humans and animals. In this paper, we report a soil borne bacterium, B2-DHA that can be used as a vehicle to effectively remove chromium from the contaminated sources. B2-DHA is resistant to chromium with a MIC value of 1000 mu g mL(-1) potassium chromate. The bacterium has been identified as a Gram negative, Enterobacter cloacae based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene analysis. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analyses confirmed intracellular accumulation of chromium and thus its removal from the contaminated liquid medium. Chromium accumulation in cells was 320 mu g/g of cells dry biomass after 120-h exposure, and thus it reduced the chromium concentration in the liquid medium by as much as 81%. Environmental scanning electron micrograph revealed the effect of metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that B2-DHA has the potential to reduce chromium significantly to safe levels from the contaminated environments and suggest the potential use of this bacterium in reducing human exposure to chromium, hence avoiding poisoning.

Keywords
Bioremediation, chromium, Enterobacter cloacae, human health, soil borne bacterium, tannery effluents
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45753 (URN)10.1080/10934529.2015.1047670 (DOI)000359339900006 ()26191988 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937800926 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, AKT-2010-018Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 229-2007-217
Note

Funding Agency:

Nilsson-Ehle (The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund) Foundation in Sweden

Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kumar, R., Pradhan, A., Khan, F. A., Lindström, P., Ragnvaldsson, D., Ivarsson, P., . . . Jass, J. (2015). Comparative analysis of stress induced gene expression in caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to environmental and lab reconstituted complex metal mixture. PLoS ONE, 10(7), Article ID e0132896.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative analysis of stress induced gene expression in caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to environmental and lab reconstituted complex metal mixture
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e0132896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metals are essential for many physiological processes and are ubiquitously present in the environment. However, high metal concentrations can be harmful to organisms and lead to physiological stress and diseases. The accumulation of transition metals in the environment due to either natural processes or anthropogenic activities such as mining results in the contamination of water and soil environments. The present study used Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate gene expression as an indicator of physiological response, following exposure to water collected from three different locations downstream of a Swedish mining site and a lab reconstituted metal mixture. Our results indicated that the reconstituted metal mixture exerted a direct stress response in C. elegans whereas the environmental waters elicited either a diminished or abrogated response. This suggests that it is not sufficient to use the biological effects observed from laboratory mixtures to extrapolate the effects observed in complex aquatic environments and apply this to risk assessment and intervention.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45584 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0132896 (DOI)000358193100095 ()26168046 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20110183
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro Universitet J62200

Boliden Mineral AB

Envix Nord AB

ALS Scandinavia AB

Available from: 2015-08-18 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Rahman, A., Nahar, N., Nawani, N. N., Jass, J., Ghosh, S., Olsson, B. & Mandal, A. (2015). Comparative genome analysis of Lysinibacillus B1-CDA, a bacterium that accumulates arsenics. Genomics, 106(6), 384-392
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative genome analysis of Lysinibacillus B1-CDA, a bacterium that accumulates arsenics
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2015 (English)In: Genomics, ISSN 0888-7543, E-ISSN 1089-8646, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 384-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previously, we reported an arsenic resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, isolated from an arsenic contaminated lands. Here, we have investigated its genetic composition and evolutionary history by using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Lysinibacillus genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of similar to 4.5 Mb in size encompassing similar to 80% of the chromosomal DNA. We found that the set of ordered contigs contains abundant regions of similarity with other Lysinibacillus genomes and clearly identifiable genome rearrangements. Furthermore, all genes of B1-CDA that were predicted be involved in its resistance to arsenic and/or other heavy metals were annotated. The presence of arsenic responsive genes was verified by PCR in vitro conditions. The findings of this study highlight the significance of this bacterium in removing arsenics and other toxic metals from the contaminated sources. The genetic mechanisms of the isolate could be used to cope with arsenic toxicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2015
Keywords
Toxic metals, Bioremediation, Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, Genome sequencing, de novo assembly, Gene prediction
National Category
Environmental Sciences Environmental Biotechnology
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47292 (URN)10.1016/j.ygeno.2015.09.006 (DOI)000365613100010 ()26387925 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84948102629 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) AKT-2010-018

Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS) 229-2007-217

Nilsson-Ehle (The Royal Physio-graphic Society in Lund) foundation in Sweden

Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7957-0310

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