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Fagerström, A., Mölling, P., Khan, F. A., Sundqvist, M., Jass, J. & Söderquist, B. (2019). Comparative distribution of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from urine infections and environmental waters. PLoS ONE, 14(11), Article ID e0224861.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative distribution of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from urine infections and environmental waters
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 11, article id e0224861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli have been reported in natural environments, and may be released through wastewater. In this study, the genetic relationship between ESBL-producing E. coli collected from patient urine samples (n = 45, both hospitalized patients and out-patients) and from environmental water (n = 82, from five locations), during the same time period, was investigated. Three independent water samples were collected from the municipal wastewater treatment plant, both incoming water and treated effluent water; the receiving river and lake; and a bird sanctuary near the lake, on two different occasions. The water was filtered and cultured on selective chromID ESBL agar plates in order to detect and isolate ESBL-producing E. coli. Illumina whole genome sequencing was performed on all bacterial isolates (n = 127). Phylogenetic group B2 was more common among the clinical isolates than the environmental isolates (44.4% vs. 17.1%, p < 0.01) due to a significantly higher prevalence of sequence type (ST) 131 (33.3% vs. 13.4%, p < 0.01). ST131 was, however, one of the most prevalent STs among the environmental isolates. There was no significant difference in diversity between the clinical isolates (DI 0.872 (0.790-0.953)) and the environmental isolates (DI 0.947 (0.920-0.969)). The distribution of ESBL genes was similar: blaCTX-M-15 dominated, followed by blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-27 in both the clinical (60.0%, 8.9%, and 6.7%) and the environmental isolates (62.2%, 12.2%, and 8.5%). Core genome multi-locus sequence typing showed that five environmental isolates, from incoming wastewater, treated wastewater, Svartån river and Hjälmaren lake, were indistinguishable or closely related (≤10 allele differences) to clinical isolates. Isolates of ST131, serotype O25:H4 and fimtype H30, from the environment were as closely related to the clinical isolates as the isolates from different patients were. This study confirms that ESBL-producing E. coli are common in the aquatic environment even in low-endemic regions and suggests that wastewater discharge is an important route for the release of ESBL-producing E. coli into the aquatic environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS, 2019
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77879 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0224861 (DOI)31697734 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2020-02-26Bibliographically approved
Stylianou, M., Björnsdotter, M., Olsson, P.-E., Ericson Jogsten, I. & Jass, J. (2019). Distinct transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans to different exposure routes of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid. Environmental Research, 168, 406-413
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans to different exposure routes of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 168, p. 406-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although people are exposed daily to per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs), the biological consequences are poorly explored. The health risks associated with PFAS exposure are currently based on chemical analysis with a weak correlation to potential harmful effects in man and animals. In this study, we show that perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), often the most enriched PFAS in the environment, can be transferred via bacteria to higher organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans nematodes were exposed to PFOS directly in buffer or by feeding on bacteria pretreated with PFOS, and this led to distinct gene expression profiles. Specifically, heavy metal and heat shock associated genes were significantly, although inversely, expressed following the different PFOS exposures. The innate immunity receptor for microbial pathogens, clec-60, was shown for the first time to be down-regulated by PFOS. This is in line with a previous study indicating that PFOS is associated with children's susceptibility to certain infectious diseases. Furthermore, bar-1, a gene associated with various cancers was highly up-regulated only when C. elegans were exposed to PFOS pretreated live bacteria. Furthermore, dead bacterial biomass had higher binding capacity for linear and isomeric PFOS than live bacteria, which correlated to the higher levels of PFOS detected in C. elegans when fed the treated E. toll, respectively. These results reveal new aspects concerning trophic chain transport of PFOS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
PFOS biosorption, PFOS isomers, Nematode, Escherichia coli, Food chain
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71130 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2018.10.019 (DOI)000452938700043 ()30388497 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055720038 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20140180
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University

Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Ahmed, M. S., Abdel Hadi, H., Hassan, A. A. I., Abu Jarir, S., Al-Maslamani, M. A., Eltai, N. O., . . . Omrani, A. S. (2019). Evaluation of in vitro activity of ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Qatar. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 74(12), 3497-3504
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of in vitro activity of ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Qatar
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 3497-3504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the in vitro activity of ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam against clinical isolates of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Qatar, as well as the mechanisms of resistance.

METHODS: MDR P. aeruginosa isolated between October 2014 and September 2015 from all public hospitals in Qatar were included. The BD PhoenixTM system was used for identification and initial antimicrobial susceptibility testing, while Liofilchem MIC Test Strips (Liofilchem, Roseto degli Abruzzi, Italy) were used for confirmation of ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam susceptibility. Ten ceftazidime/avibactam- and/or ceftolozane/tazobactam-resistant isolates were randomly selected for WGS.

RESULTS: A total of 205 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were included. Of these, 141 (68.8%) were susceptible to ceftazidime/avibactam, 129 (62.9%) were susceptible to ceftolozane/tazobactam, 121 (59.0%) were susceptible to both and 56 (27.3%) were susceptible to neither. Twenty (9.8%) isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime/avibactam but not to ceftolozane/tazobactam and only 8 (3.9%) were susceptible to ceftolozane/tazobactam but not to ceftazidime/avibactam. Less than 50% of XDR isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime/avibactam or ceftolozane/tazobactam. The 10 sequenced isolates belonged to six different STs and all produced AmpC and OXA enzymes; 5 (50%) produced ESBL and 4 (40%) produced VIM enzymes.

CONCLUSIONS: MDR P. aeruginosa susceptibility rates to ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam were higher than those to all existing antipseudomonal agents, except colistin, but were less than 50% in extremely resistant isolates. Non-susceptibility to ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam was largely due to the production of ESBL and VIM enzymes. Ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam are possible options for some patients with MDR P. aeruginosa in Qatar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78572 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkz379 (DOI)000501732800012 ()31504587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075093622 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 219-2014-837
Note

Funding Agencies:

Medical Research Centre at Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar  IRGC-01-51-033

United States Department of Health & Human Services

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA

NIH National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases (NIAID) R01AI100560 R01AI063517 R01AI072219

Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs from the Biomedical Laboratory Research & Development Service of the VA Office of Research and Development  1I01BX001974

Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs from the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center VISN 10  1I01BX001974

Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Rai, N., Sjöberg, V., Forsberg, G., Karlsson, S., Olsson, P.-E. & Jass, J. (2019). Metal contaminated soil leachates from an art glass factory elicit stress response, alter fatty acid metabolism and reduce lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Science of the Total Environment, 651, 2218-2227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal contaminated soil leachates from an art glass factory elicit stress response, alter fatty acid metabolism and reduce lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 651, p. 2218-2227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study evaluated the toxicity of metal contamination in soils from an art glass factory in Smaland Sweden using a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model. The aim of the study was to chemically analyze the soil samples and study the biological effects of water-soluble leachates on the nematodes using different physiological endpoints. The total metal content showed that As, Cd and Pb were at levels above the guideline values for soils in areas around the factory. Less than 10% of the total metal content in the soil was found in the water-soluble leachates, however, Al, As, Fe and Pb remained higher than the guideline values for safe drinking water. Exposure of C. elegans to the water-soluble leachates, at both post-hatching larvae stage (L1-young adult) for 48 h and at the young adult stage (L4) for 6 h, showed significant gene alteration. Although the nematodes did not exhibit acute lethality, lifespan was significantly reduced upon exposure. C. elegans also showed altered gene expression associated with stress response and fat metabolism, as well as enhanced accumulation of body fat. The study highlighted the significance of assessing environmental samples using a combination of gene expression analysis, fatty acid metabolism and lifespan for providing valuable insight into the negative impact of metals. The altered fat metabolism and reduced lifespan on exposure to soil leachates motivates further studies to explore the mechanism of the toxicity associated with the metals present in the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Contaminated soil, Water-soluble leachates, Ecotoxicology, Lipid metabolism, Heavy metals, Glass manufacturing
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70482 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.067 (DOI)000450551600055 ()30326454 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054622934 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150084
Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Yewale, P. P., Lokhande, K. B., Sridhar, A., Vaishnav, M., Khan, F. A., Mandal, A., . . . Nawani, N. (2019). Molecular profiling of multidrug-resistant river water isolates: insights into resistance mechanism and potential inhibitors. Environmental science and pollution research international
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular profiling of multidrug-resistant river water isolates: insights into resistance mechanism and potential inhibitors
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2019 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Polluted waters are an important reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes and multidrug-resistant bacteria. This report describes the microbial community, antibiotic resistance genes, and the genetic profile of extended spectrum β-lactamase strains isolated from rivers at, Pune, India. ESBL-producing bacteria isolated from diverse river water catchments running through Pune City were characterized for their antibiotic resistance. The microbial community and types of genes which confer antibiotic resistance were identified followed by the isolation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on selective media and their genome analysis. Four representative isolates were sequenced using next generation sequencing for genomic analysis. They were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and two isolates were Enterobacter cloacae. The genes associated with the multidrug efflux pumps, such as tolC, macA, macB, adeL, and rosB, were detected in the isolates. As MacAB-TolC is an ABC type efflux pump responsible for conferring resistance in bacteria to several antibiotics, potential efflux pump inhibitors were identified by molecular docking. The homology model of their MacB protein with that from Escherichia coli K12 demonstrated structural changes in different motifs of MacB. Molecular docking of reported efflux pump inhibitors revealed the highest binding affinity of compound MC207-110 against MacB. It also details the potential efflux pump inhibitors that can serve as possible drug targets in drug development and discovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Antimicrobial resistance, Efflux pump inhibitors, Extended spectrum β-lactamase, MacB, Multidrug efflux pump
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75620 (URN)10.1007/s11356-019-05738-2 (DOI)31236860 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Khan, F. A., Söderquist, B. & Jass, J. (2019). Prevalence and Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swedish Aquatic Environments Impacted by Household and Hospital Wastewater. Frontiers in Microbiology, 10, Article ID 688.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swedish Aquatic Environments Impacted by Household and Hospital Wastewater
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 688Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and non-lactose fermenting Gram-negative bacteria are a major cause of nosocomial infections. Antibiotic misuse has fueled the worldwide spread of resistant bacteria and the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance (ARGs). There is evidence that ARGs are ubiquitous in non-clinical environments, especially those affected by anthropogenic activity. However, the emergence and primary sources of ARGs in the environment of countries with strict regulations for antibiotics usage are not fully explored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the repertoire of ARGs of culturable Gram-negative bacteria from directionally connected sites from the hospital to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and downstream aquatic environments in central Sweden. The ARGs were detected from genomic DNA isolated from a population of selectively cultured coliform and Gram-negative bacteria using qPCR. The results show that hospital wastewater was a reservoir of several class B beta-lactamase genes such as bla(IMP)(-1), bla(IMP)(-2), and bla(OXA-23), however, most of these genes were not observed in downstream locations. Moreover, beta-lactamase genes such as bla(OXA-48), bla(CDX-M-8), and bla(SFC-1), bla(VIM-1), and bla(VIM-13) were detected in downstream river water but not in the WWTP. The results indicate that the WWTP and hospital wastewaters were reservoirs of most ARGs and contribute to the diversity of ARGs in associated natural environments. However, this study suggests that other factors may also have minor contributions to the prevalence and diversity of ARGs in natural environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
carbapenemase, urban wastewater, surface water, enterobacteriaceae, VIM-1, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, antimicrobial resistance gene co-occurrence
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73758 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2019.00688 (DOI)000463403600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 219-2014-837Knowledge Foundation, 20150084
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden at Örebro University Hospital  

Örebro University 

Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Junnarkar, M., Pawar, S., Gaikwad, S., Mandal, A., Jass, J. & Nawani, N. (2019). Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria from fresh vegetables: Application in food preservation. Paper presented at 15th International Conference on Biotechnological Research and Innovation for Sustainable Development (BioSD), Hyderabad, India, November 22-25, 2018. Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, 57(11), 825-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria from fresh vegetables: Application in food preservation
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2019 (English)In: Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0019-5189, E-ISSN 0975-1009, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 825-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fresh vegetables are potential source of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In the present study, LAB were isolated from the fresh vegetables from Pune region. Total 266 LAB were isolated from the edible parts of fresh vegetables viz. cauliflower, gherkins, cluster beans, fenugreek, cow pea, bitter gourd, french beans, tomato, ridged gourd, cucumber and bottle gourd. On phenotypic and molecular characterization predominant genera obtained were Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Weissella. Twenty one isolates exhibited tolerance to bile salt, acidic pH and pancreatin. Cellular extracts of several isolates with ability to survive in artificial intestinal condition additionally showed antioxidant potential and cell free supernatants exhibited antibacterial potential against selected plant and human pathogens. Bacteriocin and bacteriocin like substance (BLS) substances secreted by these isolates can be used for food preservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New Delhi, India: NISCAIR-CSIR, 2019
Keywords
Antioxidant activity, Antibacterial activity, Bacteriocins, LAB
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80152 (URN)000512218800007 ()
Conference
15th International Conference on Biotechnological Research and Innovation for Sustainable Development (BioSD), Hyderabad, India, November 22-25, 2018
Available from: 2020-02-24 Created: 2020-02-24 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Ozoline, O. N. & Jass, J. (2019). Secretion and signalling of bacterial RNAs. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 366(1), Article ID fny281.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secretion and signalling of bacterial RNAs
2019 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 366, no 1, article id fny281Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Immunology Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70619 (URN)10.1093/femsle/fny281 (DOI)000469761500006 ()30517616 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058908270 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

RSF  18-14-00348

Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Goswami, M., Khan, F. A., Ibrisevic, A., Olsson, P.-E. & Jass, J. (2018). Development of Escherichia coli-based gene expression profiling of sewage sludge leachates. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 125(5), 1502-1517
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Escherichia coli-based gene expression profiling of sewage sludge leachates
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Microbiology, ISSN 1364-5072, E-ISSN 1365-2672, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 1502-1517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The impact of municipal waste on pathogenic microorganisms released into the environment is a public health concern. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of sewage sludge and antibiotic contaminants on stress response, virulence and antibiotic resistance in a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

METHODS AND RESULTS: The effects of sewage sludge leachates on uropathogenic E. coli CFT073 were determined by monitoring the expression of 45 genes associated with antibiotic/metal resistance, stress response and virulence using RT-qPCR. The E. coli gene expression was validated using sub-inhibitory concentrations of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. E. coli exposed to sewage sludge or sewage sludge-fly ash leachates altered the expression of 5 antibiotic and metal resistance, 3 stress response and 2 virulence associated genes. When antibiotics were combined with sludge or sludge-fly ash the antibiotic-associated gene expression was altered.

CONCLUSIONS: E. coli treated with two sludge leachates had distinct gene expression patterns that were altered when the sludge leachates were combined with tetracycline, although to a lesser extent with ciprofloxacin.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF STUDY: The E. coli multigene expression analysis is a potential new tool for assessing the effects of pollutants on pathogenic microbes in environmental waters for improved risk assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Ecotoxicity, Gene expression, Resistance, Sludge, Stress response, Virulence
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67511 (URN)10.1111/jam.14028 (DOI)000447408400024 ()29928772 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050482911 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, Dnr 20110177
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Pradhan, A., Olsson, P.-E. & Jass, J. (2018). Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diethyl phthalate disrupt lipid metabolism, reduce fecundity and shortens lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Chemosphere, 190, 375-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diethyl phthalate disrupt lipid metabolism, reduce fecundity and shortens lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans
2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 190, p. 375-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The widespread use of phthalates is of major concern as they have adverse effects on many different physiological functions, including reproduction, metabolism and cell differentiation. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of the widely-used di (2-ethydlhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) with its substitute, diethyl phthalate (DEP). We analyzed the toxicity of these two phthalates using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. Gene expression analysis following exposure during the L1 to young adult stage showed that DEHP and DEP alter the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and stress response. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, including fasn-1, pod-2, fat-5, acs-6 and sbp-1, and vitellogenin were upregulated. Among the stress response genes, ced-1 wah-1, daf-21 and gst-4 were upregulated, while cd-1, cdf-2 and the heat shock proteins (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.48 and sip-1) were down regulated. Lipid staining revealed that DEHP significantly increased lipid content following 1 mu M exposure, however, DEP required 10 mu M exposure to elicit an effect. Both DEHP and DEP reduced the fecundity at 1 mu M concentration. Lifespan analysis indicated that DEHP and DEP reduced the average lifespan from 14 days in unexposed worms to 13 and 12 days, respectively. Expression of lifespan associated genes showed a correlation to shortened lifespan in the exposed groups. As reported previously, our data also indicates that the banned DEHP is toxic to C. elegans, however its substitute DEP has not been previously tested in this model organism and our data revealed that DEP is equally potent as DEHP in regulating C. elegans physiological functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Plasticizer, Metabolism, Reproduction, Toxicity, Longevity
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62890 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.09.123 (DOI)000414881600041 ()29020644 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030660035 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 201504600Knowledge Foundation, 20140180 20150084
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7957-0310

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