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Hyötyläinen, TuuliaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4382-4355
Publications (10 of 95) Show all publications
Lamichhane, S., Kemppainen, E., Trošt, K., Siljander, H., Hyöty, H., Ilonen, J., . . . Oresic, M. (2019). Circulating metabolites in progression to islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating metabolites in progression to islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes
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2019 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Metabolic dysregulation may precede the onset of type 1 diabetes. However, these metabolic disturbances and their specific role in disease initiation remain poorly understood. In this study, we examined whether children who progress to type 1 diabetes have a circulatory polar metabolite profile distinct from that of children who later progress to islet autoimmunity but not type 1 diabetes and a matched control group.

METHODS: We analysed polar metabolites from 415 longitudinal plasma samples in a prospective cohort of children in three study groups: those who progressed to type 1 diabetes; those who seroconverted to one islet autoantibody but not to type 1 diabetes; and an antibody-negative control group. Metabolites were measured using two-dimensional GC high-speed time of flight MS.

RESULTS: In early infancy, progression to type 1 diabetes was associated with downregulated amino acids, sugar derivatives and fatty acids, including catabolites of microbial origin, compared with the control group. Methionine remained persistently upregulated in those progressing to type 1 diabetes compared with the control group and those who seroconverted to one islet autoantibody. The appearance of islet autoantibodies was associated with decreased glutamic and aspartic acids.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that children who progress to type 1 diabetes have a unique metabolic profile, which is, however, altered with the appearance of islet autoantibodies. Our findings may assist with early prediction of the disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Beta cell autoimmunity, Metabolomics, Type 1 diabetes
National Category
Other Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75892 (URN)10.1007/s00125-019-04980-0 (DOI)31444528 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Lamichhane, S., Ahonen, L., Dyrlund, T. S., Dickens, A. M., Siljander, H., Hyöty, H., . . . Oresic, M. (2019). Cord-Blood Lipidome in Progression to Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes. Biomolecules, 9(1), Article ID E33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cord-Blood Lipidome in Progression to Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes
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2019 (English)In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id E33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies suggest that children who progress to type 1 diabetes (T1D) later in life already have an altered serum lipid molecular profile at birth. Here, we compared cord blood lipidome across the three study groups: children who progressed to T1D (PT1D; n = 30), children who developed at least one islet autoantibody but did not progress to T1D during the follow-up (P1Ab; n = 33), and their age-matched controls (CTR; n = 38). We found that phospholipids, specifically sphingomyelins, were lower in T1D progressors when compared to P1Ab and the CTR. Cholesterol esters remained higher in PT1D when compared to other groups. A signature comprising five lipids was predictive of the risk of progression to T1D, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.83. Our findings provide further evidence that the lipidomic profiles of newborn infants who progress to T1D later in life are different from lipidomic profiles in P1Ab and CTR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Autoimmunity, cord blood, lipidomics, metabolomics, type 1 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71853 (URN)10.3390/biom9010033 (DOI)000458051700033 ()30669674 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060365305 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

JDRF  4-1998-274  4-1999-731 4-2001-435 

Special research funds for Oulu, Tampere and Turku University Hospitals in Finland  

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation  2-SRA-2014-159-Q-R 

Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence in Molecular Systems Immunology and Physiology Research-SyMMyS)  250114 

Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Hernández-Alvarez, M. I., Sebastián, D., Vives, S., Ivanova, S., Bartoccioni, P., Kakimoto, P., . . . Zorzano, A. (2019). Deficient Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Phosphatidylserine Transfer Causes Liver Disease. Cell, 177(4), 881-895.e17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deficient Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Phosphatidylserine Transfer Causes Liver Disease
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2019 (English)In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 177, no 4, p. 881-895.e17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-alcoholic fatty liver is the most common liver disease worldwide. Here, we show that the mitochondrial protein mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) protects against liver disease. Reduced Mfn2 expression was detected in liver biopsies from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Moreover, reduced Mfn2 levels were detected in mouse models of steatosis or NASH, and its re-expression in a NASH mouse model ameliorated the disease. Liver-specific ablation of Mfn2 in mice provoked inflammation, triglyceride accumulation, fibrosis, and liver cancer. We demonstrate that Mfn2 binds phosphatidylserine (PS) and can specifically extract PS into membrane domains, favoring PS transfer to mitochondria and mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) synthesis. Consequently, hepatic Mfn2 deficiency reduces PS transfer and phospholipid synthesis, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the development of a NASH-like phenotype and liver cancer. Ablation of Mfn2 in liver reveals that disruption of ER-mitochondrial PS transfer is a new mechanism involved in the development of liver disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cell Press, 2019
Keywords
MAMs, Mfn2, NASH, mitochondria, phosphatidylserine, phospholipid transfer
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74195 (URN)10.1016/j.cell.2019.04.010 (DOI)000466843000010 ()31051106 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064698279 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

CONACYT, Mexico  

MICINN Spain  

Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento do Pessoal de Nivel Superior (CAPES)  

MINECO  SAF201675246R 

Generalitat de Catalunya (ICREA Academia)  2014SGR48  2017SGR696 

INFLAMES (ISCIII) PIE-14/00045 

CIBERDEM, ISCIII, INTERREG IV-B-SUDOE-FEDER (DIOMED)  SOE1/P1/E178 

"la Caixa'' Foundation  

Miguel Servet tenure-track program from the Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria  CP10/00438  CPII16/00008 

ERD  

MINECO through the Centres of Excellence Severo Ochoa Award  

CERCA Programme of the Generalitat de Catalunya 

Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Geng, D., Musse, A. A., Wigh, V., Carlsson, C., Engwall, M., Oresic, M., . . . Hyötyläinen, T. (2019). Effect of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) on the liver lipid metabolism of the developing chicken embryo. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 170, 691-698
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) on the liver lipid metabolism of the developing chicken embryo
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2019 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 170, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is a well-known contaminant in the environment and it has shown to disrupt multiple biological pathways, particularly those related with lipid metabolism. In this study, we have studied the impact of in ovo exposure to PFOS on lipid metabolism in livers in developing chicken embryos using lipidomics for detailed characterization of the liver lipidome. We used an avian model (Gallus gallus domesticus) for in ovo treatment at two levels of PFOS. The lipid profile of the liver of the embryo was investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Over 170 lipids were identified, covering phospholipids, ceramides, di- and triacylglycerols, cholesterol esters and fatty acid composition of the lipids. The PFOS exposure caused dose dependent changes in the lipid levels, which included upregulation of specific phospholipids associated with the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway, triacylglycerols with low carbon number and double bond count as well as of lipotoxic ceramides and diacylglycerols. Our data suggest that at lower levels of exposure, mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation is suppressed while the peroxisomal fatty acid β -oxidation is increased. At higher doses, however, both β -oxidation pathways are upregulated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Avian model, Lipidomics, Liver metabolism, Mass spectrometry, Perfluorooctanesulfonate
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71192 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.12.040 (DOI)000456890700083 ()30580163 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058940877 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-05176Swedish Research Council FormasKnowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Luukkonen, P. K., Nick, A., Hölttä-Vuori, M., Thiele, C., Isokuortti, E., Lallukka-Brück, S., . . . Yki-Järvinen, H. (2019). Human PNPLA3-I148M variant increases hepatic retention of polyunsaturated fatty acids. JCI Insight, 4(16), Article ID 127902.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human PNPLA3-I148M variant increases hepatic retention of polyunsaturated fatty acids
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2019 (English)In: JCI Insight, ISSN 2379-3708, Vol. 4, no 16, article id 127902Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The common patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) variant I148M predisposes to nonalcoholic liver disease but not its metabolic sequelae. We compared the handling of labeled polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) in vivo in humans and in cells harboring different PNPLA3 genotypes. In 148M homozygous individuals, triglycerides (TGs) in very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) were depleted of PUFAs both under fasting and postprandial conditions compared with 148I homozygotes, and the PUFA/SFA ratio in VLDL-TGs was lower relative to the chylomicron precursor pool. In human PNPLA3-148M and PNPLA3-KO cells, PUFA but not SFA incorporation into TGs was increased at the expense of phosphatidylcholines, and under lipolytic conditions, PUFA-containing diacylglycerols (DAGs) accumulated compared with PNPLA3-148I cells. Polyunsaturated TGs were increased, while phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were decreased in the human liver in 148M homozygous individuals as compared with 148I homozygotes. We conclude that human PNPLA3-I148M is a loss-of-function allele that remodels liver TGs in a polyunsaturated direction by impairing hydrolysis/transacylation of PUFAs from DAGs to feed phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), 2019
Keywords
Genetic variation, Hepatitis, Hepatology, Metabolism
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75893 (URN)10.1172/jci.insight.127902 (DOI)000482229000011 ()31434800 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Academy of Finland  309263  282192  307415  312491 

EU H2020 project Elucidating Pathways of Steatohepatitis (HY EPoS grant)  634413 

H2020-JTI-IMI2 EU project  777377-2 

EVO foundation  

Paulo foundation  

Sigrid Juselius foundation  

Finnish Medical foundation  

Alfred Kordelin foundation  

Liv och Hälsa foundation 

Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Salihovic, S., Fall, T., Ganna, A., Broeckling, C. D., Prenni, J. E., Hyötyläinen, T., . . . Lind, L. (2019). Identification of metabolic profiles associated with human exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances. Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, 29(2), 196-205
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of metabolic profiles associated with human exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, ISSN 1559-0631, E-ISSN 1559-064X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 196-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent epidemiological studies suggest that human exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) may be associated with type 2 diabetes and other metabolic phenotypes. To gain further insights regarding PFASs exposure in humans, we here aimed to characterize the associations between different PFASs and the metabolome. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated 965 individuals from Sweden (all aged 70 years, 50% women) sampled in 2001-2004. PFASs were analyzed in plasma using isotope-dilution ultra-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Non-target metabolomics profiling was performed in plasma using UPLC coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOFMS) operated in positive electrospray mode. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate associations between circulating levels of PFASs and metabolites. In total, 15 metabolites, predominantly from lipid pathways, were associated with levels of PFASs following adjustment for sex, smoking, exercise habits, education, energy, and alcohol intake, after correction for multiple testing. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were strongly associated with multiple glycerophosphocholines and fatty acids including docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). We also found that the different PFASs evaluated were associated with distinctive metabolic profiles, suggesting potentially different biochemical pathways in humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
Keywords
Epidemiology, Metabolomics, PFOA, PFOS, Perfluoroalkyl substances, XCMS
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68801 (URN)10.1038/s41370-018-0060-y (DOI)000459048700007 ()30185940 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053396898 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2015-756 2013-478Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineSwedish Research Council, 2015-03477
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Madrid-Gambin, F., Focking, M., Sabherwal, S., Heurich, M., English, J. A., O'Gorman, A., . . . Brennan, L. (2019). Integrated Lipidomics and Proteomics Point to Early Blood-Based Changes in Childhood Preceding Later Development of Psychotic Experiences: Evidence From the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Biological Psychiatry, 86(1), 25-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated Lipidomics and Proteomics Point to Early Blood-Based Changes in Childhood Preceding Later Development of Psychotic Experiences: Evidence From the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children
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2019 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The identification of early biomarkers of psychotic experiences (PEs) is of interest because early diagnosis and treatment of those at risk of future disorder is associated with improved outcomes. The current study investigated early lipidomic and coagulation pathway protein signatures of later PEs in subjects from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort.

METHODS: Plasma of 115 children (12 years of age) who were first identified as experiencing PEs at 18 years of age (48 cases and 67 controls) were assessed through integrated and targeted lipidomics and semitargeted proteomics approaches. We assessed the lipids, lysophosphatidylcholines (n = 11) and phosphatidylcholines (n = 61), and the protein members of the coagulation pathway (n = 22) and integrated these data with complement pathway protein data already available on these subjects.

RESULTS: Twelve phosphatidylcholines, four lysophosphatidylcholines, and the coagulation protein plasminogen were altered between the control and PEs groups after correction for multiple comparisons. Lipidomic and proteomic datasets were integrated into a multivariate network displaying a strong relationship between most lipids that were significantly associated with PEs and plasminogen. Finally, an unsupervised clustering approach identified four different clusters, with one of the clusters presenting the highest case-control ratio (p < .01) and associated with a higher concentration of smaller low-density lipoprotein cholesterol particles.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that the lipidome and proteome of subjects who report PEs at 18 years of age are already altered at 12 years of age, indicating that metabolic dysregulation may contribute to an early vulnerability to PEs and suggesting crosstalk between these lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, and coagulation and complement proteins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
ALSPAC, Early life, Integration, Lipidomics, Proteomics, Psychotic episode
National Category
Neurology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75212 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.01.018 (DOI)000472860900007 ()30878195 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062721715 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 102215/2/13/2
Note

Funding Agencies:Health Research Board  HRA-POR-2013-282  HRBCSA2012/8 

European Research Council  647783  724809 

European Union FP7 collaborative project METSY  602478 

National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol  

Irish Health Research Board Clinician Scientist Award  

UK Medical Research Council  102215/2/13/2 

Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
Fang, W., Santosh, L., Oresic, M. & Hyötyläinen, T. (2019). Lipidomes in health and disease: Analytical strategies and considerations. TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, 120, Article ID 115664.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lipidomes in health and disease: Analytical strategies and considerations
2019 (English)In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 120, article id 115664Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lipidomics is a rapidly-growing field which focuses on global characterization of lipids at molecular and systems levels. As small changes in the concentrations of lipids may have important physiological consequences, much attention in the field has recently been paid to more accurate quantitation and identification of lipids. Community-wide efforts have been initiated, aiming to develop best practices for lipidomic analyses and reporting of lipidomic data. Nevertheless, current approaches for comprehensive analysis of lipidomes have some inherent challenges and limitations. Additionally, there is, currently, limited knowledge concerning the impacts of various external and internal exposures on lipid levels. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in lipidomics analysis, with a primary focus on analytical approaches, as well as on the different sources of variation in quantifying lipid levels, both technical and biological.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Biomarkers, Lipid identification, Lipidomics, Mass spectrometry, Metabolomics, Quantification
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77194 (URN)10.1016/j.trac.2019.115664 (DOI)2-s2.0-85072601123 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Sen, P., Carlsson, C., Virtanen, S. M., Simell, S., Hyöty, H., Ilonen, J., . . . Oresic, M. (2019). Persistent Alterations in Plasma Lipid Profiles Before Introduction of Gluten in the Diet Associated With Progression to Celiac Disease. Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, 10, Article ID e-00044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persistent Alterations in Plasma Lipid Profiles Before Introduction of Gluten in the Diet Associated With Progression to Celiac Disease
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2019 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 10, article id e-00044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy characterized by an autoimmune reaction in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals. The underlying causes of autoimmune reaction and its effect on host metabolism remain largely unknown. Herein, we apply lipidomics to elucidate the early events preceding clinical CD in a cohort of Finnish children, followed up in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention study.

METHODS: Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics profiling was applied to a longitudinal/prospective series of 233 plasma samples obtained from CD progressors (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 23), matched for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk, sex, and age. The children were followed from birth until diagnosis of clinical CD and subsequent introduction of a gluten-free diet.

RESULTS: Twenty-three children progressed to CD at a mean age of 4.8 years. They showed increased amounts of triacylglycerols (TGs) of low carbon number and double bond count and a decreased level of phosphatidylcholines by age 3 months as compared to controls. These differences were exacerbated with age but were not observed at birth (cord blood). No significant differences were observed in the essential TGs.

DISCUSSION: Our preliminary findings suggest that abnormal lipid metabolism associates with the development of clinical CD and occurs already before the first introduction of gluten to the diet. Moreover, our data suggest that the specific TGs found elevated in CD progressors may be due to a host response to compromised intake of essential lipids in the small intestine, requiring de novo lipogenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74371 (URN)10.14309/ctg.0000000000000044 (DOI)000468998400001 ()31082858 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence in Molecular Systems Immunology and Physiology Research-SyMMyS)  250114  292568

Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Djekic, D., Pinto, R., Repsilber, D., Hyötyläinen, T. & Henein, M. (2019). Serum untargeted lipidomic profiling reveals dysfunction of phospholipid metabolism in subclinical coronary artery disease. Vascular Health and Risk Management, 15, 123-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum untargeted lipidomic profiling reveals dysfunction of phospholipid metabolism in subclinical coronary artery disease
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2019 (English)In: Vascular Health and Risk Management, ISSN 1176-6344, E-ISSN 1178-2048, Vol. 15, p. 123-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Disturbed metabolism of cholesterol and triacylglycerols (TGs) carries increased risk for coronary artery calcification (CAC). However, the exact relationship between individual lipid species and CAC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify disturbances in lipid profiles involved in the calcification process, in an attempt to propose potential biomarker candidates.

Patients and methods: We studied 70 patients at intermediate risk for coronary artery disease who had undergone coronary calcification assessment using computed tomography and Agatston coronary artery calcium score (CACS). Patients were divided into three groups: with no coronary calcification (NCC; CACS: 0; n=26), mild coronary calcification (MCC; CACS: 1-250; n=27), or severe coronary calcification (SCC; CACS: >250; n=17). Patients' serum samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in an untargeted lipidomics approach.

Results: We identified 103 lipids within the glycerolipid, glycerophospholipid, sphingolipid, and sterol lipid classes. After false discovery rate correction, phosphatidylcholine (PC)(16:0/20:4) in higher levels and PC(18:2/18:2), PC(36:3), and phosphatidylethanolamine(20:0/18:2) in lower levels were identified as correlates with SCC compared to NCC. There were no significant differences in the levels of individual TGs between the three groups; however, clustering the lipid profiles showed a trend for higher levels of saturated and monounsaturated TGs in SCC compared to NCC. There was also a trend for lower TG (49:2), TG(51:1), TG(54:5), and TG(56:8) levels in SCC compared to MCC.

Conclusion: In this study we investigated the lipidome of patients with coronary calcification. Our results suggest that the calcification process may be associated with dysfunction in autophagy. The lipidomic biomarkers revealed in this study may aid in better assessment of patients with subclinical coronary artery disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE Medical Press Ltd., 2019
Keywords
coronary artery calcification, coronary artery calcium score, lipidomics, triacylglycerol, lipids, atherosclerosis, autophagy
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74648 (URN)10.2147/VHRM.S202344 (DOI)000468547500001 ()
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4382-4355

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