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Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Eriksson, G. & Kenalemang, L. M. (2023). How cosmetic apps fragmentise and metricise the female face: A multimodalcritical discourse analysis. Discourse & Communication, 17(3), 278-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How cosmetic apps fragmentise and metricise the female face: A multimodalcritical discourse analysis
2023 (English)In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 278-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present time, we see a rapid development of so-called cosmetic apps promoted by prominent cosmetic companies. Although there is an emerging market for male consumers, these apps are marketed as technological innovations designed to analyse, rate and evaluate mainly women’s facial appearances through the submission of a selfie. Based on the results generated from the selfie, personalised solutions are offered in the form of recommended products to supposedly help women improve their appearances. Drawing on a critical feminist approach and using multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA), the aim of this article is to study how these evaluations are semiotically reproduced and presented to the users. The paper examines in detail how apps convey the evaluation process and transform a selfie into measures, presented through diagrams and charts, that is, how the female face is fragmented and metricised. Coming with affordances of being systematic, exact and scientific, these infographics assign the facial evaluations with meaning. A key argument is that these cosmetic apps are changing the way women are implied to consider and control their (facial) appearance. Following neoliberal notions, the apps put strong pressure on women to take the responsibility to engage in intensive forms of aesthetic labour and to consume the ‘right’ products to appear as the best versions of themselves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Aesthetic labour, cosmetic apps, feminist approach, fragmentation, metricisation, multimodal critical discourse analysis
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105207 (URN)10.1177/17504813231155085 (DOI)000954689900001 ()2-s2.0-85150933947 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2023-06-22Bibliographically approved
Kenalemang-Palm, L. M. & Eriksson, G. (2023). The scientifization of “green” anti-ageing cosmetics in online marketing: a multimodal critical discourse analysis. Social Semiotics, 33(5), 1026-1045
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The scientifization of “green” anti-ageing cosmetics in online marketing: a multimodal critical discourse analysis
2023 (English)In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1026-1045Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the marketing of trending green cosmetic products containing natural ingredients and coming with claims to keep skin health-enhancing and age-defying benefits. This is fostered by the growing importance of successful ageing and the neoliberal self-care agenda. Adopting the notion of "integrated design" from Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis (MCDA), this paper looks at the communicative affordances of the web and how marketers of "green" cosmetics connect these to science. The analysis shows that the integrated design of the webpages allows cosmetic companies to connote science while glossing over significant details, leaving causalities, classifications, and processes unspecified. This marketing frames fighting the "look" of ageing as a moral and ethical consumption choice. Such choices relate to self-care regimes of a "successful" neoliberal citizenship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Commodity feminism, green cosmetics, integrated design, multimodal critical discourse analysis, science communication, successful ageing
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-94857 (URN)10.1080/10350330.2021.1981128 (DOI)000702703400001 ()2-s2.0-85116350568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-08 Created: 2021-10-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Chen, A. & Eriksson, G. (2022). Connoting a neoliberal and entrepreneurial discourse of science through infographics and integrated design: the case of ‘functional’ healthy drinks. Critical Discourse Studies, 19(3), 290-308
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connoting a neoliberal and entrepreneurial discourse of science through infographics and integrated design: the case of ‘functional’ healthy drinks
2022 (English)In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 290-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Riding on the rising concern of public health and the growing neoliberal self-care agenda, the food market has witnessed a surge in ‘healthy’ food despite the criticism of this food does not help consumers eat more healthily. A growing interest in CriticalDiscourse Studies (CDS) is how food marketers colonise not only the food discourse but also the broader ideas and values such as health, politics, and environment. Contributing to this growing body of research, we look at one of the fastest-growing food trends, ‘functional drinks’, which claim to target physiological and psychological processes in the body, so that consumers can manage their health and performance. Company websites rely on forms of infographics to communicate how the products work. Adopting the notion of ‘integrated design’ from multimodal CDS, we show how these infographics, drawing on their affordancesare particularly useful in symbolising classifications and causalities which could not be accounted for in running texts. The paper argues that this is a way health and science converge with a neoliberal discourse of self-management and enterprise culture. Given the increased use of forms of integrated design incommunication, more critical discursive work is needed in this area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Critical discourse analysis, Multimodality, integrated design, infographics, affordance, Recontextualisation, science communication, neoliberalism, functional food
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-88835 (URN)10.1080/17405904.2021.1874450 (DOI)000608905900001 ()2-s2.0-85099715333 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-22 Created: 2021-01-22 Last updated: 2022-08-24Bibliographically approved
O’Hagan, L. A. & Eriksson, G. (2022). Modern science, moral mothers, and mythical nature: a multimodal analysis of cod liver oil marketing in Sweden, 1920–1930. Food and Foodways
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modern science, moral mothers, and mythical nature: a multimodal analysis of cod liver oil marketing in Sweden, 1920–1930
2022 (English)In: Food and Foodways, ISSN 0740-9710, E-ISSN 1542-3484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper offers the first case study of the marketing of codliver oil in Sweden (1920–1930), following the discovery of vitamins A and D. Drawing upon a large dataset of cod liveroil advertisements from the Swedish Newspaper Archive, it uses multimodal critical discourse analysis to investigate how language and other semiotic resources (e.g. image, typography, color) work together to convey the benefits of cod liver oil intake. It identifies three overarching themes—scientific rationality, scientific motherhood, and nature—noting how advertisements were aimed squarely at mothers and struck a balancebetween vitamins as scientifically formulated products and mythical, natural substances to convince them that cod liveroil was necessary for their children. Exploring how cod liver oil was marketed from a historical perspective shows how nutritional research gained prominence and became of increasing importance for marketing, as well as how food, through science, became incorporated into a consumerist lifestyle. It also provides a way to deconstruct contemporary marketing practices, thereby enabling consumers to rethink products framed as indispensable for their health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Advertisements, cod liver oil, marketing, multimodal critical discourse analysis, nature, science, scientific motherhood, Sweden, vitamins
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-101602 (URN)10.1080/07409710.2022.2124725 (DOI)000857182300001 ()2-s2.0-85133756364 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-02 Created: 2022-10-02 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G. (2022). Promoting extreme fitness regimes through the communicative affordances of reality makeover television: a multimodal critical discourse analysis. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 39(5), 408-426
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting extreme fitness regimes through the communicative affordances of reality makeover television: a multimodal critical discourse analysis
2022 (English)In: Critical Studies in Media Communication, ISSN 1529-5036, E-ISSN 1479-5809, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 408-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taking off from the theory of social semiotics and using the methods of multimodal critical discourse analysis, this paper demonstrates how the communicative affordances of a Swedish reality makeover show, The Great Health Journey, are used to promote discourses normalizing extreme fitness ideals. It is a show that reduces health to body fitness and supports a particular health consciousness gaining prominence today, an ideology here depicted as fitnessism. Progressing the ideas put forward by Crawford (1980, Healthism and the medicalization of everyday life. International Journal of Health Services, 10(3), 365-388; Crawford, 2006. Health as a meaningful social practice. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine, 10(4), 401-420) with the notion of healthism, fitnessism accentuates the careful submission to strict fitness-related regimes as crucial for a healthy lifestyle. It turns the very fit body into a sign of good morals, indicating the values of self-discipline, self-control, and willpower, personal characteristics seen as crucial in the neoliberal era. But the healthiness of this fitness ideal can be questioned. Rather than serving the interest of public health, fitnessism seems to mainly encourage "aesthetic labour" (Elias et al., 2017. Aesthetic labour: Rethinking beauty politics in neoliberalism. Palgrave Macmillan) and support commercial interests to exploit body dissatisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Communicative affordances, fitnessism, healthism, makeover television, reality television, social semiotics
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-100161 (URN)10.1080/15295036.2022.2091153 (DOI)000819770700001 ()2-s2.0-85133249691 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-07-28 Created: 2022-07-28 Last updated: 2023-08-23Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H. & Eriksson, G. (2022). The masculinization of domestic cooking: a historical study of Swedish cookbooks for men. Norma, 17(4), 252-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The masculinization of domestic cooking: a historical study of Swedish cookbooks for men
2022 (English)In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 252-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyzes how men's domestic cooking is represented and masculinized in cookbooks, written by men for men and published in 1975, 1992, and 2010, respectively. Departing from the concept of domestic masculinities, it uses the methods of Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis. It asks: what kind of values and ideas connected to men, food, and the home are realized in texts and images? And how are these legitimized and naturalized? As the study's context is Sweden, a country known for its pursuit of gender equality, the study focuses on how men's domestic cooking has been represented in cookbooks published roughly 20 years apart. The analysis shows that, while the first two books are characterized by a 'real man' discourse and working-class masculinity, the 2010 book represents a masculinity in line with a 'new man image' closely linked to consumption and materiality. However, structurally, there are few differences. Values associated with traditional middle-class masculinities, traditional gender norms, and gendered division of domestic labor are reproduced. Men's cooking is recontextualized as a playful leisure activity. In all three books, cooking becomes another way for a man to appear successful - both in relation to other men and women, and in socioeconomic terms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Cookbooks, domestic masculinity, gender equality, gender, multimodal critical discourse analysis, new man image
National Category
Media and Communications Communication Studies Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99732 (URN)10.1080/18902138.2022.2091918 (DOI)000815389700001 ()2-s2.0-85132818257 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-23 Created: 2022-06-23 Last updated: 2022-11-29Bibliographically approved
Tagg, C., Lee, C., Vásquez, C., Eriksson, G., Anderson, C. & Fitzgerald, R. (2021). Discourse, context & media: Relevance in a changing world. Discourse, Context & Media, 39, Article ID 100486.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discourse, context & media: Relevance in a changing world
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2021 (English)In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 39, article id 100486Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-89564 (URN)10.1016/j.dcm.2021.100468 (DOI)000667137300006 ()2-s2.0-85100098889 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-12 Created: 2021-02-12 Last updated: 2021-07-30Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G. & O’Hagan, L. A. (2021). Selling "Healthy" Radium Products With Science: A Multimodal Analysis of Marketing in Sweden, 1910-1940. Science communication, 43(6), 740-767
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selling "Healthy" Radium Products With Science: A Multimodal Analysis of Marketing in Sweden, 1910-1940
2021 (English)In: Science communication, ISSN 1075-5470, E-ISSN 1552-8545, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 740-767Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study the marketing of radioactive products in Sweden from 1910 to 1940, using a dataset of newspaper and magazine advertisements. We use multimodal critical discourse analysis to show how marketers harnessed the meaning potentials of language and semiotic resources to embed radium in discourses of science and technological development, and thus convince consumers of its health benefits. We find that canny marketers continuously colonized, shaped, and remarketed radioactive products in response to greater scientific knowledge and growing safety concerns. These techniques highlight the challenges of distinguishing legitimate/illegitimate applications of discoveries when science and entrepreneurialism move at the same pace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
History of science, marketing, newspapers, radium, Sweden
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-94240 (URN)10.1177/10755470211044111 (DOI)000693744900001 ()2-s2.0-85114521347 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Communication of "good" foods and healthy lifestyles
Available from: 2021-09-10 Created: 2021-09-10 Last updated: 2022-01-19Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G. & Machin, D. (2020). Discourses of 'Good food': The commercialization of healthy and ethical eating. Discourse, Context & Media, 33, 1-7, Article ID 100365.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discourses of 'Good food': The commercialization of healthy and ethical eating
2020 (English)In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 33, p. 1-7, article id 100365Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many societies, governments have become concerned about diet related illnesses and the huge economic costs of managing them, disseminating information about things like eating, balanced diets and the foods we should avoid in excess. At the same time in our shops and cafes there have been a proliferation of products which carry possibilities for making more healthy choices. Yet research shows that the health-related properties these products offer are largely contradictory, confusing and more about market buzzwords than actual healthy food. And such healthy choices have tended to blur and merge with notions of ethical and moral shopping. In this introduction to a collection of articles on the discourses of good food, we look at some of the research on ‘good food’ showing exactly what a multimodal critical discourse perspective can contribute to the field. We show that closer analysis of product packaging, marketing, cook books, media reports and policy documents can help us to understand how commercial forces are colonizing and shaping our ideas of what it means to be healthy and also to act as good citizens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79775 (URN)10.1016/j.dcm.2019.100365 (DOI)000509790900002 ()2-s2.0-85076721780 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-05 Created: 2020-02-05 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Breazu, P. & Eriksson, G. (2020). Romaphobia in Romanian press: The lifting of work restrictions for Romanian migrants in the European Union. Discourse & Communication, 15(2), 139-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Romaphobia in Romanian press: The lifting of work restrictions for Romanian migrants in the European Union
2020 (English)In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 139-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lifting of work restrictions for Romanian and Bulgarian citizens in the EU, in January 2014, encountered much resistance both in European political discourse and the media, as these migrants became demonised and presented as social and economic threats. In this article, we show how the Romanian press dealt with such discriminatory discourses against the Romanian migrants. We conduct a thorough Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis (MCDA) of news items published in Romanian press, prior to the lifting of work restrictions, and we argue that the Roma emerged as the perfect scapegoats that could explain the deviant and unruly behaviours ascribed by some western media to ‘Romanians’. We also show how racism toward the Roma, referred here as Romaphobia, invokes non-racial practices and instead builds on a reverse victimhood narrative. Such discourses relate in a broader sense to well-established discursive practices in Romanian context but also to the political climate across Europe which is marked by increased intolerance toward the Roma. It is the mixture of stereotypical discourses and populist rhetoric that makes racism towards the Roma appear naturalised and increasingly more difficult to challenge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
media representation, racism, Roma, recontextualisation, multimodal critical discourse analysis
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-88160 (URN)10.1177/1750481320982153 (DOI)000608761000001 ()2-s2.0-85097914810 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-21 Created: 2020-12-21 Last updated: 2021-12-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1089-5819

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