oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 202) Show all publications
Weimers, P., Halfvarson, J., Sachs, M. C., Ludvigsson, J. F., Peter, I., Olén, O. & Burisch, J. (2019). Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find? [Letter to the editor]. Gut, 68(1), 175-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 175-176Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71215 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316937 (DOI)000455727900023 ()30021791 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050249090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Walker, G. J., Harrison, J. W., Heap, G. A., Voskuil, M. D., Andersen, V., Anderson, C. A., . . . Ahmad, T. (2019). Association of Genetic Variants in NUDT15 With Thiopurine-Induced Myelosuppression in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), 321(8), 773-785
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Genetic Variants in NUDT15 With Thiopurine-Induced Myelosuppression in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 321, no 8, p. 773-785Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Use of thiopurines may be limited by myelosuppression. TPMT pharmacogenetic testing identifies only 25% of at-risk patients of European ancestry. Among patients of East Asian ancestry, NUDT15 variants are associated with thiopurine-induced myelosuppression (TIM).

Objective: To identify genetic variants associated with TIM among patients of European ancestry with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 491 patients affected by TIM and 679 thiopurine-tolerant unaffected patients who were recruited from 89 international sites between March 2012 and November 2015. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exome-wide association studies (EWAS) were conducted in patients of European ancestry. The replication cohort comprised 73 patients affected by TIM and 840 thiopurine-tolerant unaffected patients.

Exposures: Genetic variants associated with TIM.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, defined as a decline in absolute white blood cell count to 2.5 × 109/L or less or a decline in absolute neutrophil cell count to 1.0 × 109/L or less leading to a dose reduction or drug withdrawal.

Results: Among 1077 patients (398 affected and 679 unaffected; median age at IBD diagnosis, 31.0 years [interquartile range, 21.2 to 44.1 years]; 540 [50%] women; 602 [56%] diagnosed as having Crohn disease), 919 (311 affected and 608 unaffected) were included in the GWAS analysis and 961 (328 affected and 633 unaffected) in the EWAS analysis. The GWAS analysis confirmed association of TPMT (chromosome 6, rs11969064) with TIM (30.5% [95/311] affected vs 16.4% [100/608] unaffected patients; odds ratio [OR], 2.3 [95% CI, 1.7 to 3.1], P = 5.2 × 10-9). The EWAS analysis demonstrated an association with an in-frame deletion in NUDT15 (chromosome 13, rs746071566) and TIM (5.8% [19/328] affected vs 0.2% [1/633] unaffected patients; OR, 38.2 [95% CI, 5.1 to 286.1], P = 1.3 × 10-8), which was replicated in a different cohort (2.7% [2/73] affected vs 0.2% [2/840] unaffected patients; OR, 11.8 [95% CI, 1.6 to 85.0], P = .03). Carriage of any of 3 coding NUDT15 variants was associated with an increased risk (OR, 27.3 [95% CI, 9.3 to 116.7], P = 1.1 × 10-7) of TIM, independent of TPMT genotype and thiopurine dose.

Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients of European ancestry with IBD, variants in NUDT15 were associated with increased risk of TIM. These findings suggest that NUDT15 genotyping may be considered prior to initiation of thiopurine therapy; however, further study including additional validation in independent cohorts is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72877 (URN)10.1001/jama.2019.0709 (DOI)000460191400019 ()30806694 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062067665 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

International Serious Adverse Events Consortium  

Crohn's Colitis UK  

Wellcome Trust  WT097835MF 

National Institutes of Health  P01DK046763 

Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Everhov, Å. H., Sachs, M. C., Malmborg, P., Nordenvall, C., Myrelid, P., Khalili, H., . . . Olén, O. (2019). Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: To investigate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) register-based subtype classifications over a patient's disease course and over time.

METHODS: We examined International Classification of Diseases coding in patients with ≥2 IBD diagnostic listings in the National Patient Register 2002-2014 (n = 44,302).

RESULTS: 18% of the patients changed diagnosis (17% of adults, 29% of children) during a median follow-up of 3.8 years. Of visits with diagnoses of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), 97% were followed by the same diagnosis, whereas 67% of visits with diagnosis IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) were followed by another IBD-U diagnosis. Patients with any diagnostic change changed mostly once (47%) or twice (31%), 39% from UC to CD, 33% from CD to UC and 30% to or from IBD-U. Using a classification algorithm based on the first two diagnoses ('incident classification'), suited for prospective cohort studies, the proportion adult patients with CD, UC, and IBD-U 2002-2014 were 29%, 62%, and 10% (43%, 45%, and 12% in children). A classification model incorporating additional information from surgeries and giving weight to the last 5 years of visits ('prevalent classification'), suited for description of a study population at end of follow-up, classified 31% of adult cases as CD, 58% as UC and 11% as IBD-U (44%, 38%, and 18% in children).

CONCLUSIONS: IBD subtype changed in 18% during follow-up. The proportion with CD increased and UC decreased from definition at start to end of follow-up. IBD-U was more common in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Crohn’s disease, IBD-U, Inflammatory bowel disease, indeterminate colitis, inflammatory bowel disease unclassified, register-based definition, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72038 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2018.1564361 (DOI)30700170 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Örtqvist, A. K., Lundholm, C., Halfvarson, J., Ludvigsson, J. F. & Almqvist, C. (2019). Fetal and early life antibiotics exposure and very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: a population-based study. Gut, 68(2), 218-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal and early life antibiotics exposure and very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: a population-based study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 218-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies on antibiotics exposure and development of IBD (Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC)) may have been biased by familial factors and gastroenteritis. We aimed to estimate the association between antibiotics during pregnancy or infantile age and very early onset (VEO) IBD.

DESIGN: In this cohort study of 827 239 children born in Sweden between 2006 and 2013, we examined the link between exposure to systemic antibiotics and VEO-IBD (diagnosis <6 years of age), using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Information on antibiotics and IBD was retrieved from the nationwide population-based Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the National Patient Register. We specifically examined potential confounding from parental IBD and gastroenteritis.

RESULTS: Children exposed to antibiotics during pregnancy were at increased risk of IBD compared with general population controls (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.93; 95% CI 1.06 to 3.50). Corresponding aHRs were 2.48 (95% CI 1.01 to 6.08) for CD and 1.25 (95% CI 0.47 to 3.26) for UC, respectively. For antibiotics in infantile age, the aHR for IBD was 1.11 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.15); for CD 0.72 (95% CI 0.27 to 1.92) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.45 to 3.39) for UC. Excluding children with gastroenteritis 12 months prior to the first IBD diagnosis retained similar aHR for antibiotics during pregnancy and CD, while the association no longer remained significant for IBD.

CONCLUSION: We found that exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy, but not in infantile age, is associated with an increased risk of VEO-IBD regardless of gastroenteritis. The risk increase for exposure in pregnancy may be due to changes in the microbiota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Antibiotics, crohn’s colitis, epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66361 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2017-314352 (DOI)000459027800008 ()29321166 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049136111 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Weimers, P., Halfvarson, J., Sachs, M. C., Saunders-Pullman, R., Ludvigsson, J. F., Peter, I., . . . Olén, O. (2019). Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 25(1), 111-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have examined the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Parkinson's disease (PD).

Methods: To estimate the incidence and relative risk of PD development in a cohort of adult IBD, we included all incident IBD patients (n = 39,652) in the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) between 2002 and 2014 (ulcerative colitis [UC]: n = 24,422; Crohn's disease [CD]: n = 11,418; IBD-unclassified [IBD-U]: n = 3812). Each IBD patient was matched for sex, age, year, and place of residence with up to 10 reference individuals (n = 396,520). In a cohort design, all incident PD occurring after the index date was included from the NPR. In a case-control design, all incident PD occurring before the index date was included. The association between IBD and PD and vice versa was investigated by multivariable Cox and logistic regression.

Results: In IBD, there were 103 cases of incident PD, resulting in hazard ratios (HRs) for PD of 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.7; P = 0.04) in UC, 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7) in CD, and 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8-3.0) in IBD-U. However, these effects disappeared when adjusting for number of medical visits during follow-up to minimize potential surveillance bias. In a case-control analysis, IBD patients were more likely to have prevalent PD at the time of IBD diagnosis than matched controls, with odds ratios of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.2-1.8) in all IBD patients, 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.9) for UC, and 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.3) for CD patients alone.

Conclusions: IBD is associated with an increased risk of PD, but some of this association might be explained by surveillance bias. 10.1093/ibd/izy190_video1izy190.video15785623138001.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71220 (URN)10.1093/ibd/izy190 (DOI)29788069 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058603803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Burisch, J., Katsanos, K. H., Christodoulou, D. K., Barros, L., Magro, F., Pedersen, N., . . . Munkholm, P. (2019). Natural Disease Course of Ulcerative Colitis During the First Five Years of Follow-up in a European Population-based Inception Cohort-An Epi-IBD Study. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 13(2), 198-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Natural Disease Course of Ulcerative Colitis During the First Five Years of Follow-up in a European Population-based Inception Cohort-An Epi-IBD Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Aims: Few population-based cohort studies have assessed the disease course of ulcerative colitis [UC] in the era of biological therapy and widespread use of immunomodulators. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year outcome and disease course of patients with UC in the Epi-IBD cohort.

Methods: In a prospective, population-based inception cohort of unselected patients with UC, patients were followed up from the time of their diagnosis, which included the collection of their clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, and rates of surgery, cancers, and deaths. Associations between outcomes and multiple covariates were analysed by Cox regression analysis.

Results: A total of 717 patients were included in the study. During follow-up, 43 [6%] patients underwent a colectomy and 163 [23%] patients were hospitalised. Of patients with limited colitis [distal to the left flexure], 90 [21%] progressed to extensive colitis. In addition, 92 [27%] patients with extensive colitis experienced a regression in disease extent, which was associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.5 95% CI: 0.3-0.8]. Overall, patients were treated similarly in both geographical regions; 80 [11%] patients needed biological therapy and 210 [29%] patients received immunomodulators. Treatment with immunomodulators was found to reduce the risk of hospitalisation [HR: 0.5 95% CI: 0.3-0.8].

Conclusions: Although patients in this population-based cohort were treated more aggressively with immunomodulators and biological therapy than in cohorts from the previous two decades, their disease outcomes, including colectomy rates, were no different. However, treatment with immunomodulators was found to reduce the risk of hospitalisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Ulcerative colitis, surgery, hospitalisation, prognosis, treatment, biologics
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69337 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy154 (DOI)000459356300008 ()30289522 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061058790 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Kirsten og Freddy Johansens Fond  

Nordsjaellands Hospital Forskningsrad 

Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Drobin, K., Assadi, G., Hong, M.-G., Andersson, E., Fredolini, C., Forsström, B., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2019). Targeted Analysis of Serum Proteins Encoded at Known Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk Loci. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 25(2), 306-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted Analysis of Serum Proteins Encoded at Known Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk Loci
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 306-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have investigated the blood proteome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We characterized the serum abundance of proteins encoded at 163 known IBD risk loci and tested these proteins for their biomarker discovery potential.

Methods: Based on the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) antibody availability, 218 proteins from genes mapping at 163 IBD risk loci were selected. Targeted serum protein profiles from 49 Crohn's disease (CD) patients, 51 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 50 sex- and age-matched healthy individuals were obtained using multiplexed antibody suspension bead array assays. Differences in relative serum abundance levels between disease groups and controls were examined. Replication was attempted for CD-UC comparisons (including disease subtypes) by including 64 additional patients (33 CD and 31 UC). Antibodies targeting a potentially novel risk protein were validated by paired antibodies, Western blot, immuno-capture mass spectrometry, and epitope mapping.

Results: By univariate analysis, 13 proteins mostly related to neutrophil, T-cell, and B-cell activation and function were differentially expressed in IBD patients vs healthy controls, 3 in CD patients vs healthy controls and 2 in UC patients vs healthy controls (q < 0.01). Multivariate analyses further differentiated disease groups from healthy controls and CD subtypes from UC (P < 0.05). Extended characterization of an antibody targeting a novel, discriminative serum marker, the laccase (multicopper oxidoreductase) domain containing 1 (LACC1) protein, provided evidence for antibody on-target specificity.

Conclusions: Using affinity proteomics, we identified a set of IBD-associated serum proteins encoded at IBD risk loci. These candidate proteins hold the potential to be exploited as diagnostic biomarkers of IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 2019
Keywords
inflammatory bowel disease, affinity proteomics, LACC1
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69892 (URN)10.1093/ibd/izy326 (DOI)30358838 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Danese, S., Allez, M., van Bodegraven, A. A., Dotan, I., Gisbert, J. P., Hart, A., . . . Vermeire, S. (2019). Unmet Medical Needs in Ulcerative Colitis: An Expert Group Consensus. Digestive Diseases
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unmet Medical Needs in Ulcerative Colitis: An Expert Group Consensus
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Digestive Diseases, ISSN 0257-2753, E-ISSN 1421-9875Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The authors aimed to conduct an extensive literature review and consensus meeting to identify unmet needs in ulcerative colitis (UC) and ways to overcome them. UC is a relapsing and remitting inflammatory bowel disease with varied, and changing, incidence rates worldwide. UC has an unpredictable disease course and is associated with a high health economic burden. During 2016 and 2017, a panel of experts was convened to identify, discuss and address areas of unmet need in UC.

METHODS: PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant articles describing studies performed in patients with UC. These findings were used to generate a set of statements relating to unmet needs in UC. Consensus on these statements was then sought from a panel of 9 expert gastroenterologists using a modified Delphi review process that consisted of anonymous surveys followed by live meetings.

RESULTS: In 2 literature reviews, over 5,000 unique records were identified and a total of 138 articles were fully reviewed. These were used to consider 26 areas of unmet need, which were explored in 2 face-to-face meetings, in which the statements were debated and amended, resulting in consensus on 30 final statements. The unmet needs identified were categorised into 7 areas: impact of UC on patients' daily life; importance of early diagnosis and treatment; drawbacks of existing treatments; urgent need for new treatments; and disease-, practice- or patient-focused unmet needs.

CONCLUSIONS: These expert group meetings found a number of areas of unmet needs in UC, which is an important first step in tackling them in the future. Future research and development should be focused in these areas for the management of patients with UC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
Keywords
Consensus panel, Delphi process, Systematic literature review, Ulcerative colitis, Unmet needs
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72369 (URN)10.1159/000496739 (DOI)30726845 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Rundquist, S., Eriksson, C., Nilsson, L., Angelison, L., Jäghult, S., Björk, J., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2018). Clinical effectiveness of golimumab in Crohn's disease: an observational study based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG). Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 53(10-11), 1257-1263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical effectiveness of golimumab in Crohn's disease: an observational study based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG)
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 53, no 10-11, p. 1257-1263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of golimumab in Crohn's disease (CD) is largely unknown as it is not approved for the treatment of the disease. We aimed to identify the population of CD patients treated with golimumab in Sweden, to assess the effectiveness of golimumab (defined as the drug retention rate), and to identify predictors of drug discontinuation.

METHODS: Patients with CD who received at least one injection of golimumab were identified through the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, which includes prospectively collected clinical information. Cox regression models were used to identify predictors of golimumab discontinuation.

RESULTS: The study cohort involved 94 patients of whom the majority (96.8%) had previously discontinued at least one anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agent. The drug retention rate at 12 weeks was 85.1%. Predictors of golimumab discontinuation at 12 weeks were previous surgery (adjusted HR = 7.52, 95% CI: 1.12-50.36), concomitant corticosteroid use at baseline (adjusted HR = 5.70, 95% CI: 1.13-28.68) and female sex (adjusted HR = 6.59; 95% CI: 1.04-41.62). The median duration of follow-up was 89 (IQR: 32-158) weeks. The drug retention at the most recent follow-up was 35.1%. Predictors of golimumab discontinuation at the most recent follow-up were corticosteroid use at baseline (adjusted HR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.17-5.79) and female sex (adjusted HR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.19-4.23).

CONCLUSION: Patients with CD treated with golimumab were a treatment-refractory group. Despite this, more than one-third of the patients appeared to have had clinical benefit after a median follow-up of more than 1.5 years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Crohn’s disease, Golimumab, IBD, SWIBREG, biological treatment
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69893 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2018.1519597 (DOI)000457980900016 ()30353751 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055482894 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, C., Bergemalm, D., Vigren, L., Nilsson, L., Visuri, I., Hjortswang, H., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2018). Clinical effectiveness of golimumab: Interim analysis of the observational study of patients with ulcerative colitis on golimumab in the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD-GO-SWIBREG. Paper presented at 13th Congress of ECCO – European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation, Vienna, Austria, February 14-17, 2018. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 12(Suppl. 1), S409-S410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical effectiveness of golimumab: Interim analysis of the observational study of patients with ulcerative colitis on golimumab in the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD-GO-SWIBREG
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. S409-S410Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66750 (URN)000427318901372 ()
Conference
13th Congress of ECCO – European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation, Vienna, Austria, February 14-17, 2018
Note

Funding Agency:

MSD

Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0122-7234

Search in DiVA

Show all publications