oru.sePublikationer
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 93) Show all publications
Salih, L., Tevell, S., Månsson, E., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å., Hellmark, B. & Söderquist, B. (2018). Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from nares and prosthetic joint infections are mupirocin susceptible. Journal of bone and joint infection, 3(1), 1-4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from nares and prosthetic joint infections are mupirocin susceptible
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of bone and joint infection, ISSN 2206-3552, Vol. 3, no 1, 1-4 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the present study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility including mupirocin among Staphylococcus. epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) (n=183) and nasal isolates (n=75) from patients intended to undergo prosthetic joint replacements. Susceptibility to mupirocin (used for eradication of nasal carriership of Staphylococcus aureus) was investigated by gradient test, and susceptibility to various other antimicrobial agents was investigated by disc diffusion test. All isolates, except three from PJIs and one from the nares, were fully susceptible to mupirocin. Multi-drug resistance (≥3 antibiotic classes) was found in 154/183 (84.2%) of the PJI isolates but only in 2/75 (2.7%) of the nares isolates, indicating that S. epidermidis causing PJIs do not originate from the nares.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ivyspring International Publisher, 2018
Keyword
Antibiotic susceptibility testing, Mupirocin, Prosthetic joint infections, Staphylococcus epidermidis
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64047 (URN)10.7150/jbji.22459 (DOI)29291157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Thunberg, U., Söderquist, B. & Hugosson, S. (2017). Bacterial findings in optimised sampling and characterisation of S. aureus in chronic rhinosinusitis. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 274(1), 311-319.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial findings in optimised sampling and characterisation of S. aureus in chronic rhinosinusitis
2017 (English)In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 274, no 1, 311-319 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The bacterial spectrum in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is clinically relevant. This study aimed to compare two sampling techniques and to characterise Staphylococcus aureus isolated from CRS patients. Bacterial specimens were collected from the nares and maxillary sinus in 42 CRS patients and from the nares in 57 healthy controls. Maxillary sinus sampling was performed in two ways in each patient: with a cotton-tipped aluminium swab through the enlarged sinus ostium, and with a protected brush. S. aureus was characterised by DNA-sequencing of the repeat region of the S. aureus protein A gene, spa typing. The protected brush technique was superior to the cotton-tipped aluminium swab in reducing contamination rate. However, the two sampling methods were consistent in terms of clinically relevant bacterial findings, and the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped swab can still be recommended when culturing the maxillary sinus. Patients showed a significantly higher presence of S. aureus in the nares compared with healthy controls, and healthy controls showed a significantly higher presence of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the nares compared with patients. The spa types were identical for the nares and maxillary sinus in all patients except one. The sampling techniques showed equivalent results, indicating a low risk of unnecessary antibiotic treatment when using the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped aluminium swab. The high rate of identical spa types of S. aureus isolated from the nares and maxillary sinus of CRS patients might indicate colonisation of the maxillary sinus from the nares.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, 2017
Keyword
Staphylococcus aureus, sinusitis, nasal polyps, sampling studies, bacterial typing
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51748 (URN)10.1007/s00405-016-4239-3 (DOI)000393599900039 ()27538736 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84982255261 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Orebro County Council

Available from: 2016-08-23 Created: 2016-08-23 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen, G., Cajander, S., Bäckman, A., Källman, J., Söderquist, B. & Strålin, K. (2017). Expression of HLA-DRA and CD74 mRNA in whole blood during the course of complicated and uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Microbiology and immunology, 61(10), 442-451.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of HLA-DRA and CD74 mRNA in whole blood during the course of complicated and uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Microbiology and immunology, ISSN 0385-5600, E-ISSN 1348-0421, Vol. 61, no 10, 442-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To improve management of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), better understanding of host-pathogen interactions is needed. In vitro studies have shown that S. aureus bacteria induce dose-dependent immunosuppression that is evidenced by reduced expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II on antigen presenting cells. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether expression of the MHC class II-related genes HLA-DRA and CD74 is more greatly reduced in complicated SAB, with its probable higher loads of S. aureus, than in uncomplicated SAB. Adult patients with SAB were prospectively included and blood samples taken on the day of confirmation of SAB (Day 1) and on Days 2, 3, 5 and 7. HLA-DRA and CD74 mRNA expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Sepsis was defined according to the Sepsis-3 classification and SAB was categorized as complicated in patients with deep-seated infection and/or hematogenous seeding. Twenty patients with SAB were enrolled and samples obtained on all assessment days. HLA-DRA and CD74 expression did not differ significantly between patients with SAB and sepsis (n=13) and those without sepsis (n=7) on any assessment day. However, patients with complicated SAB (n=14) had significantly weaker HLA-DRA expression on all five assessment days than patients with uncomplicated SAB (n=6). Additionally, they tended to have weaker CD74 expressions. Neutrophil, monocyte and leukocyte counts did not differ significantly between complicated and uncomplicated SAB. In conclusion, patients with complicated SAB show weaker HLA-DRA expression than those with uncomplicated SAB during the first week of bacteremia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia, 2017
Keyword
CD74, HLA-DRA, sepsis, Staphylococcus aureus
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62068 (URN)10.1111/1348-0421.12533 (DOI)000412860400005 ()28862321 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032877412 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Örebro County Council

Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Söderquist, B., Björklund, S., Hellmark, B., Jensen, A. & Brüggemann, H. (2017). Finegoldia magna Isolated from Orthopedic Joint Implant-Associated Infections. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 55(11), 3283-3291.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finegoldia magna Isolated from Orthopedic Joint Implant-Associated Infections
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 55, no 11, 3283-3291 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The anaerobic Gram-positive coccus Finegoldia magna is a rare cause of infections of bone and joints. The aim of this study was to describe the microbiological and clinical characteristics of orthopedic implant-associated infections caused by F. magna We retrospectively analyzed samples consisting of anaerobic Gram-positive cocci and samples already identified as F. magna from patients with orthopedic infections. The isolates found were determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined by Etest. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed. Clinical data were extracted from each patient's journal. In nine patients, orthopedic joint implant-associated infections were identified as being caused by F. magna The isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested, with the exception of rifampin and moxifloxacin in a few cases. Five of the nine infections were monomicrobial. The most common antibiotic used to treat the infection was penicillin V, but five of the nine patients received a combination of antibiotics. Eight patients underwent surgical treatment, with extraction of the implant performed in seven cases and reimplantation in only two cases. The WGS showed a relatively small core genome, with 126,647 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified within the core genome. A phylogenomic analysis revealed that the isolates clustered into two distinct clades. Orthopedic implant-associated infections caused by F. magna are rare, but the bacteria are generally susceptible to antibiotics. Despite this, surgical treatment combined with long-term antibiotics is often necessary. The WGS analysis revealed a high heterogeneity and suggested the existence of at least two different Finegoldia species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2017
Keyword
Finegoldia magna, antibiotic susceptibility test, orthopedic implant-associated infections, prosthetic joint infections, whole-genome sequencing
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62478 (URN)10.1128/JCM.00866-17 (DOI)000414356400019 ()28904182 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032443997 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

Nyckelfonden at Orebro University Hospital OLL-595951 

Danish Medical Research council DFF-1331-00241 

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Söderquist, B., Björklund, S., Hellmark, B., Jensen, A. & Bruggemann, H. (2017). Finegoldia magna Isolated from Orthopedic Joint Implant-Associated Infections. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 55(11), 3283-3291.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finegoldia magna Isolated from Orthopedic Joint Implant-Associated Infections
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 55, no 11, 3283-3291 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The anaerobic Gram-positive coccus Finegoldia magna is a rare cause of infections of bone and joints. The aim of this study was to describe the microbiological and clinical characteristics of orthopedic implant-associated infections caused by F. magna. We retrospectively analyzed samples consisting of anaerobic Gram-positive cocci and samples already identified as F. magna from patients with orthopedic infections. The isolates found were determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined by Etest. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed. Clinical data were extracted from each patient's journal. In nine patients, orthopedic joint implant-associated infections were identified as being caused by F. magna. The isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested, with the exception of rifampin and moxifloxacin in a few cases. Five of the nine infections were monomicrobial. The most common antibiotic used to treat the infection was penicillin V, but five of the nine patients received a combination of antibiotics. Eight patients underwent surgical treatment, with extraction of the implant performed in seven cases and reimplantation in only two cases. The WGS showed a relatively small core genome, with 126,647 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified within the core genome. A phylogenomic analysis revealed that the isolates clustered into two distinct clades. Orthopedic implant-associated infections caused by F. magna are rare, but the bacteria are generally susceptible to antibiotics. Despite this, surgical treatment combined with long-term antibiotics is often necessary. The WGS analysis revealed a high heterogeneity and suggested the existence of at least two different Finegoldia species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2017
Keyword
orthopedic implant-associated infections, prosthetic joint infections, Finegoldia magna, antibiotic susceptibility test, whole-genome sequencing
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62812 (URN)10.1128/JCM.00866-17 (DOI)000414356400019 ()28904182 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032443997 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden at Örebro University Hospital  OLL-595951 

Danish Medical Research council  DFF-1331-00241 

Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Månsson, E., Hellmark, B., Stegger, M., Andersen, P. S., Sundqvist, M. & Söderquist, B. (2017). Genomic relatedness of Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates of different origins. Journal of Medical Microbiology, 66(5), 601-608.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genomic relatedness of Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates of different origins
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 66, no 5, 601-608 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to characterize clinical and environmental Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates with regard to genomic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR and core genome phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data verified the presence of distinct clades comprising closely related S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins.

Methodology: Phylogenetic relationships between 25 S. pettenkoferi isolates collected from blood cultures and intra-operative air sampling were determined by repetitive-sequence-based PCR typing and analysis of similar to 157 000 SNPs identified in the core genome after WGS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and tests for biofilm production (microtitre plate assay) were performed.

Results: Repetitive-sequence-based PCR as well as WGS data demonstrated the close relatedness of clinically significant blood culture isolates to probable contaminants, as well as to environmental isolates. Antibiotic-susceptibility testing demonstrated a low level of antimicrobial resistance. The mecA gene was present in two cefoxitin-resistant isolates. No isolates were found to produce biofilm.

Conclusion: Close genomic relatedness of S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins were found within clades, but with substantial genomic difference between the two major clades. The ecological niche of S. pettenkoferi remains unconfirmed, but the presence of S. pettenkoferi in the air of the operating field favours the suggestion of a role in skin flora. Identification of S. pettenkoferi in clinical samples should, in a majority of cases, most likely be regarded as a probable contamination, and its role as a possible pathogen in immunocompromised hosts remains to be clarified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Microbiology Society, 2017
Keyword
Staphylococcus pettenkoferi, genotypic relatedness, repetitive-sequence based PCR typing, whole-genome sequencing
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58000 (URN)10.1099/jmm.0.000472 (DOI)000401984900007 ()28530888 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019900525 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro County Council Research Committee, Örebro, Sweden

Centre for Clinical Research, Västerås  

County Council of Västmanland Research Fund 

Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Littorin, C., Hellmark, B., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å. & Söderquist, B. (2017). In vitro activity of tedizolid and linezolid against Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 36(9), 1549-1552.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro activity of tedizolid and linezolid against Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 36, no 9, 1549-1552 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are rare but long-lasting and are serious complications without any spontaneous resolution, requiring additional surgery and long-term treatment with antibiotics. Staphylococci are the most important aetiological agents of PJIs, and among the coagulase-negative staphylococci Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common. However, S. epidermidis often displays multidrug resistance (MDR), demanding additional treatment options. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of tedizolid and linezolid against S. epidermidis isolated from PJIs. The standard antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. epidermidis (n = 183) obtained from PJIs was determined by disc diffusion test, and MIC was determined by Etest for tedizolid, linezolid, and vancomycin. Tedizolid displayed MIC values ranging from 0.094 to 0.5 mg/L (MIC50: 0.19 mg/L, MIC90: 0.38 mg/L), linezolid MIC values ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/L (MIC50: 0.75 mg/L, MIC90: 1 mg/L), and vancomycin MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 3 mg/L (MIC50 and MIC90 both 2 mg/L). According to the disc diffusion test, 153/183 (84%) isolates were resistant to ≥3 antibiotic groups, indicating MDR. In conclusion, S. epidermidis isolates from PJIs were fully susceptible, and the MIC50 and MIC90 values for tedizolid were two- to four-fold dilution steps lower compared with linezolid. Tedizolid is not approved, and there are no reports of long-term treatment, but it may display better tolerability and fewer adverse effects than linezolid; it thus could be a possible treatment option for PJIs, alone or in combination with rifampicin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57366 (URN)10.1007/s10096-017-2966-z (DOI)000407582200003 ()28326447 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015720574 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Nyckelfonden at Örebro University Hospital

Available from: 2017-05-21 Created: 2017-05-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Ehlersson, G., Hellmark, B., Svartström, O., Stenmark, B. & Söderquist, B. (2017). Phenotypic characterisation of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from blood cultures in newborn infants, with a special focus on Staphylococcus capitis. Acta Paediatrica, 106(10), 1576-1582.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phenotypic characterisation of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from blood cultures in newborn infants, with a special focus on Staphylococcus capitis
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 10, 1576-1582 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This Swedish study determined which species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were found in neonatal blood cultures and whether they included Staphylococcus capitis clones with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin.

METHODS: CoNS isolates (n = 332) from neonatal blood cultures collected at Örebro University Hospital during 1987-2014 were identified to species level with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. capitis isolates was determined by the disc diffusion test and Etest, and the presence of heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate S. capitis (hGISC) was evaluated.

RESULTS: Staphylococcus epidermidis (67.4%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (10.5%) and S. capitis (9.6%) were the most common CoNS species. Of the S. capitis isolates, 75% were methicillin-resistant and 44% were multidrug-resistant. No isolate showed decreased susceptibility to vancomycin, but at least 59% displayed the hGISC phenotype. Staphylococcus capitis isolates related to the strain CR01 displaying pulsotype NRCS-A were found.

CONCLUSION: Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. haemolyticus and S. capitis were the predominant species detected in neonatal blood cultures by MALDI-TOF MS. The number of episodes caused by S. capitis increased during the study period, but no isolates with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin were identified. However, S. capitis isolates related to the strain CR01 displaying pulsotype NRCS-A were found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keyword
Staphylococcus capitis, Antibiotic susceptibility testing, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Neonatal sepsis
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60819 (URN)10.1111/apa.13950 (DOI)000409348400008 ()28631328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85023208447 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved
Davidsson, S., Carlsson, J., Mölling, P., Gashi, N., Andrén, O., Andersson, S.-O., . . . Brüggemann, H. (2017). Prevalence of Flp Pili-Encoding Plasmids in Cutibacterium acnes Isolates Obtained from Prostatic Tissue. Frontiers in Microbiology, 8, Article ID 2241.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of Flp Pili-Encoding Plasmids in Cutibacterium acnes Isolates Obtained from Prostatic Tissue
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, 2241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of prostate cancer. The origin of inflammation is unknown, but microbial infections are suspected to play a role. In previous studies, the Gram-positive, low virulent bacterium Cutibacterium (formerly Propionibacterium) acnes was frequently isolated from prostatic tissue. It is unclear if the presence of the bacterium represents a true infection or a contamination. Here we investigated Cutibacterium acnes type II, also called subspecies defendens, which is the most prevalent type among prostatic C. acnes isolates. Genome sequencing of type II isolates identified large plasmids in several genomes. The plasmids are highly similar to previously identified linear plasmids of type I C. acnes strains associated with acne vulgaris. A PCR-based analysis revealed that 28.4% (21 out of 74) of all type II strains isolated from cancerous prostates carry a plasmid. The plasmid shows signatures for conjugative transfer. In addition, it contains a gene locus for tight adherence (tad) that is predicted to encode adhesive Flp (fimbrial low-molecular weight protein) pili. In subsequent experiments a tad locus-encoded putative pilin subunit was identified in the surface-exposed protein fraction of plasmid-positive C. acnes type II strains by mass spectrometry, indicating that the tad locus is functional. Additional plasmid-encoded proteins were detected in the secreted protein fraction, including two signal peptide-harboring proteins; the corresponding genes are specific for type II C. acnes, thus lacking from plasmid-positive type I C. acnes strains. Further support for the presence of Flp pili in C. acnes type II was provided by electron microscopy, revealing cell appendages in tad locus-positive strains. Our study provides new insight in the most prevalent prostatic subspecies of C. acnes, subsp. defendens, and indicates the existence of Flp pili in plasmid-positive strains. Such pili may support colonization and persistent infection of human prostates by C. acnes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2017
Keyword
Cutibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium acnes, plasmid, fimbrial low-molecular weight protein, pili, tight adherence, prostate cancer
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62836 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2017.02241 (DOI)000415285600001 ()29201018 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034081211 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Foundation for Medical Research at Örebro University Hospital  OLL-547931 

Danish Medical Research council  DFF-1331-00241 

Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Tevell, S., Hellmark, B., Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å. & Söderquist, B. (2017). Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 36(1), 115-122.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 36, no 1, 115-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Further knowledge about the clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by different coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) may facilitate interpretation of microbiological findings and improve treatment algorithms. Staphylococcus capitis is a CoNS with documented potential for both human disease and nosocomial spread. As data on orthopaedic infections are scarce, our aim was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of PJIs caused by S. capitis. This retrospective cohort study included three centres and 21 patients with significant growth of S. capitis during revision surgery for PJI between 2005 and 2014. Clinical data were extracted and further microbiological characterisation of the S. capitis isolates was performed. Multidrug-resistant (≥3 antibiotic groups) S. capitis was detected in 28.6 % of isolates, methicillin resistance in 38.1 % and fluoroquinolone resistance in 14.3 %; no isolates were rifampin-resistant. Heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate resistance was detected in 38.1 %. Biofilm-forming ability was common. All episodes were either early post-interventional or chronic, and there were no haematogenous infections. Ten patients experienced monomicrobial infections. Among patients available for evaluation, 86 % of chronic infections and 70 % of early post-interventional infections achieved clinical cure; 90 % of monomicrobial infections remained infection-free. Genetic fingerprinting with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR; DiversiLab®) displayed clustering of isolates, suggesting that nosocomial spread might be present. Staphylococcus capitis has the potential to cause PJIs, with infection most likely being contracted during surgery or in the early postoperative period. As S. capitis might be an emerging nosocomial pathogen, surveillance of the prevalence of PJIs caused by S. capitis could be recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2017
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52726 (URN)10.1007/s10096-016-2777-7 (DOI)000391388800014 ()27680718 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988919555 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research committee of Värmland County Council, Sweden LIVFOU-456821  LIVFOU-457061

Research committee of Östergötland County Council, Sweden LIO-447091

Örebro University, Sweden ORU 1.3.1-01273/2015

Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5939-2932

Search in DiVA

Show all publications