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Söderquist, B., Henningsson, T. & Stegger, M. (2023). Corynebacterium striatum Prosthetic Joint Infection Successfully Treated with Long-Term Dalbavancin. Microorganisms, 11(3), Article ID 550.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corynebacterium striatum Prosthetic Joint Infection Successfully Treated with Long-Term Dalbavancin
2023 (English)In: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arthroplasty surgery is a common procedure that significantly improves quality of life. The most feared complication is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), which occurs more often following revision surgery. Staphylococci are the most prevalent bacteria in PJIs, although many other pathogens have been reported. We describe a case of PJI in a 75-year-old farmer following revision surgery caused by Corynebacterium striatum, an unusual agent which normally occurs in the normal human skin microbiota with perceived low pathogenicity. Following a cemented right-sided total hip arthroplasty in 2006, a one-stage revision due to an osteolytic process in the right femur took place in 2020 with negative intraoperative tissue cultures. Three weeks later, the patient presented a fulminant infection which was treated with debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR). Tissue biopsies showed C. striatum in 6/6 samples including small colony variants. Genome sequencing showed that all isolates differed by ≤6 SNPs with the same gene content related to resistance (tet(W) and erm(X)). The patient was sequentially treated with vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin, but due to side effects, treatment was changed to 12 weeks of dalbavancin as a 1000 mg loading dose followed by 500 mg intravenously/week. Impaired renal function during vancomycin treatment was normalized, and >1 year after finishing antibiotic treatment the outcome was still favourable. In conclusion, a case of a fulminant early post-interventional PJI due to C. striatum was successfully treated with DAIR and long-term dalbavancin therapy without any adverse reactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
Corynebacterium striatum, genome sequencing, prosthetic joint infection
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105222 (URN)10.3390/microorganisms11030550 (DOI)000959136900001 ()36985124 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151360213 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-30 Created: 2023-03-30 Last updated: 2023-04-21Bibliographically approved
Simon, S., Frank, B. J. H., Hartmann, S., Aichmair, A., Söderquist, B. & Hofstaetter, J. G. (2023). Dalbavancin in Gram-positive periprosthetic joint infections-authors' response. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 78(5), 1316-1316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dalbavancin in Gram-positive periprosthetic joint infections-authors' response
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1316-1316Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105190 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkad069 (DOI)000958738400001 ()36964645 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159542188 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Al Janabi, J., Tevell, S., Sieber, R. N., Stegger, M. & Söderquist, B. (2023). Emerging resistance in Staphylococcus epidermidis during dalbavancin exposure: a case report and in vitro analysis of isolates from prosthetic joint infections. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 78(3), 669-677
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emerging resistance in Staphylococcus epidermidis during dalbavancin exposure: a case report and in vitro analysis of isolates from prosthetic joint infections
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 669-677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dalbavancin, a semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide with exceptionally long half-life and Gram-positive spectrum, is an attractive option for infections requiring prolonged therapy, including prosthetic joint infections (PJIs).

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of reduced susceptibility to dalbavancin in a strain collection of Staphylococcus epidermidis from PJIs, and to investigate genomic variation in isolates with reduced susceptibility selected during growth under dalbavancin exposure.

METHODS: MIC determination was performed on S. epidermidis isolates from a strain collection (n = 64) and from one patient with emerging resistance during treatment (n = 4). These isolates were subsequently cultured on dalbavancin-containing agar and evaluated at 48 h; MIC determination was repeated if phenotypical heterogeneity was detected during growth. Population analysis profile (PAP-AUC) was performed in isolates where a  ≥ 2-fold increase in MIC was detected, together with corresponding parental isolates (n = 21). Finally, WGS was performed.

RESULTS: All strains grew at 48 h on agar containing 0.125 mg/L dalbavancin. PAP-AUC demonstrated significant differences between parental and derived strains in four of the eight analysed groups. An amino acid change in the walK gene coinciding with emergence of phenotypic resistance was detected in the patient isolates, whereas no alterations were found in this region in the in vitro derived strains.

CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to dalbavancin may lead to reduced susceptibility to dalbavancin through either selection of pre-existing subpopulations, epigenetic changes or spontaneous mutations during antibiotic exposure. Source control combined with adequate antibiotic concentrations may be important to prevent emerging reduced susceptibility during dalbavancin treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103180 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkac434 (DOI)000908327500001 ()36611258 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151362757 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Värmland, LIVFOU-968115 LIVFOU-939253 LIVFOU-939836Region Örebro County
Note

Funding agency:

Nyckelfonden at Örebro University Hospital OLL-935525

Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Senneville, E., Cuervo, G., Gregoire, M., Hidalgo-Tenorio, C., Jehl, F., Miro, J. M., . . . Pea, F. (2023). Expert Opinion on Dose Regimen and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Long-Term Use of Dalbavancin: Expert Review Panel. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 62(5), Article ID 106960.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expert Opinion on Dose Regimen and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Long-Term Use of Dalbavancin: Expert Review Panel
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 62, no 5, article id 106960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dalbavancin is a lipoglycopeptide with a long elimination half-life, currently licensed for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) in adults. Dalbavancin's potential in treating off-label complex gram-positive infections is promising and real-world experience in treating such infections is growing. However, clear guidance on extended dosing regimens is lacking.

OBJECTIVES: We aim to provide clear expert opinion based on recent pharmacokinetic literature and expert and real-world experience in infection areas that require >2 weeks of treatment.

METHODS: A single face-to-face meeting was held in September 2022 to collate expert opinion and present safety data of dalbavancin use in these clinical indications. A survey was completed by all authors on their individual experience with dalbavancin which highlighted the heterogeneity in the regimens used. RESULTS: After review of the survey data and recent literature, we present expert panel proposals which accommodate different healthcare settings and resource availability, and centre around the length of treatment duration including up to, or exceeding, 6 weeks. To achieve adequate dalbavancin concentrations for up to 6 weeks, 3,000mg of dalbavancin should be given over 4 weeks for the agreed complex infections requiring >2 weeks treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is advised for longer treatment durations and in case of renal failure. Specific dosing recommendations for other special populations require further investigation.

CONCLUSIONS: These proposals based on expert opinion have been defined to encourage best practice with dalbavancin to optimise its administration beyond the current approved licenced dose across different healthcare settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Antibacterial, Dalbavancin, Guidance, Infection, Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-107868 (URN)10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2023.106960 (DOI)37633424 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171753749 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Löwbeer, N., Stegger, M. & Söderquist, B. (2023). Genomic characterization of beta-haemolytic streptococci isolated from prosthetic joint infections. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 131(5), 189-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genomic characterization of beta-haemolytic streptococci isolated from prosthetic joint infections
2023 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 131, no 5, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is an increasing concern for the medical profession, as higher numbers of arthroplasty surgeries lead to rising PJI-related costs. Streptococcal PJIs constitute approximately 10% of PJIs, but their genetic features and characteristics remain largely unexplored. Little is known about antimicrobial resistance (AMR) rates, whether some sequence types (ST) dominate, and whether certain virulence-associated genes are overrepresented. We used whole-genome sequencing of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n=22), Streptococcus agalactiae (n=10), and S. pyogenes (n=1) to elicit genomic data on 33 beta-haemolytic streptococci isolated from PJIs in Region Örebro county, Sweden. Relatedness was inferred based on single nucleotide polymorphisms in S. dysgalactiae and S. agalactiae. The genomic data were screened for virulence-associated genes available in the Virulence Factor Database. All isolates were screened for both phenotypic and genotypic resistance. The S. dysgalactiae and S. agalactiae isolates were genetically diverse, although 32% of S. dysgalactiae isolates (n=7) were ST20. The speS and PI-2A genes were less represented in these isolates among virulence-associated genes, and AMR was more frequently observed in S. agalactiae. We conclude that PJIs caused by beta-haemolytic streptococci are not dominated by genetically similar beta-haemolytic streptococci. There were distinct inter-species differences in AMR between S. agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Munksgaard Forlag, 2023
Keywords
Antimicrobial resistance, beta-haemolytic streptococci, prosthetic joint infection, virulence factors, whole-genome sequencing
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-103893 (URN)10.1111/apm.13299 (DOI)000936982200001 ()36715029 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85149259376 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

Nyckelfonden at Örebro University Hospital OLL-595951

Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2023-05-19Bibliographically approved
Sagerfors, S., Edslev, S., Lindblad, B. E., Lilje, B., Stegger, M. & Söderquist, B. (2023). In the eye of the ophthalmologist: the corneal microbiome in microbial keratitis. Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the eye of the ophthalmologist: the corneal microbiome in microbial keratitis
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2023 (English)In: Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 0721-832X, E-ISSN 1435-702XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To describe the bacterial findings by a targeted sequencing approach from corneal samples of patients with microbial keratitis and factors influencing culture outcome of indirectly inoculated corneal specimen.

METHODS: Prospective inclusion of patients fulfilling predefined criteria of microbial keratitis. Samples from the corneal lesion were collected and dispensed in liquid transport medium, from which both culture and targeted amplification and sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene were carried out. Additional standard corneal culture from the corneal lesions was also performed. Factors influencing culture outcome of indirectly inoculated corneal samples were identified by a multivariate regression model incorporating quantitative data from sequencing.

RESULTS: Among the 94 included patients with microbial keratitis, contact lens wear (n = 69; 73%) was the most common risk factor. Contact lens wearers displayed significant differences in the bacterial community composition of the corneal lesion compared to no lens wearers, with higher abundance of Staphylococcus spp., Corynebacterium spp., and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Targeted sequencing detected a potential corneal pathogen in the highest proportional abundance among 9 of the 24 (38%) culture-negative patients with microbial keratitis. Age, bacterial density in the sample, and prior antibiotic treatment significantly influenced culture outcome of indirectly inoculated corneal samples.

CONCLUSION: Targeted sequencing may provide insights on pathogens in both culture negative episodes of microbial keratitis and among subgroups of patients with microbial keratitis as well as factors influencing culture outcome of indirectly inoculated corneal samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Corneal microbiome, Indirect inoculation, Keratitis, Sequencing
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109869 (URN)10.1007/s00417-023-06310-y (DOI)001117993000001 ()37993692 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177574454 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Örebro CountyÖrebro University
Available from: 2023-11-24 Created: 2023-11-24 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
Lange, A., Thunberg, U. & Söderquist, B. (2023). Ototoxicity associated with extended dalbavancin treatment for a shoulder prosthetic joint infection. BMC Infectious Diseases, 23(1), Article ID 706.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ototoxicity associated with extended dalbavancin treatment for a shoulder prosthetic joint infection
2023 (English)In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 706Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dalbavancin is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections, administered as a single or two-dose treatment. The extended half-life, good penetration into bone and synovial fluid, and bactericidal activity against gram-positive bacteria, including those in biofilm, make dalbavancin an appealing choice for treatment of bone and joint infections in outpatient settings. However, we present a rare case of ototoxicity associated with off-label extended dalbavancin treatment of a prosthetic joint infection.

CASE PRESENTATION: A 55-year-old man with a prosthetic joint infection of the shoulder underwent off-label extended dalbavancin treatment, receiving a cumulative dose of 2500 mg. The patient experienced a gradual onset of hearing loss following the first dose, leading to a diagnosis of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss that persisted 1 year after dalbavancin was discontinued.

CONCLUSIONS: This case report highlights the importance of exercising caution when administering dalbavancin beyond approved dosing guidelines, and emphasizes the need for vigilance regarding the potential for ototoxicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Dalbavancin, Ototoxicity, Prosthetic joint infection
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109339 (URN)10.1186/s12879-023-08709-8 (DOI)001099357500004 ()37858087 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174539632 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-20 Created: 2023-10-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Sandström, N., Söderquist, B., Wistrand, C. & Friberg, Ö. (2023). The presence of skin bacteria in the sternal wound and contamination of implantation materials during cardiac surgery. Journal of Hospital Infection, 135, 145-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The presence of skin bacteria in the sternal wound and contamination of implantation materials during cardiac surgery
2023 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 135, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Sternal wound infections (SWI) and aortic graft infections (AGI) are serious complications after cardiac surgery. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most common causes of SWI, while AGI are less studied. AGI may occur from contamination during surgery or postoperative haematogenous spread. Skin commensals, such as Cutibacterium acnes, are present in the surgical wound; however, their ability to cause infection is debated.

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of skin bacteria in the sternal wound and to evaluate their possible ability to contaminate surgical materials.

METHODS: We included 50 patients that underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery and/or valve replacement surgery at our centre from 2020 to 2021. Cultures were collected from skin and subcutaneous tissue at two time points during surgery, and from pieces of vascular graft and felt that were pressed against subcutaneous tissue. The most common bacterial isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility with disk diffusion and gradient tests.

FINDINGS: Cultures from skin had bacterial growth in 48% of patients at surgery start and in 78% after two hours, and cultures from subcutaneous tissue were positive in 72% and 76% of patients, respectively. The most common isolates were C. acnes and S. epidermidis. Cultures from surgical materials were positive in 80-88%. No difference in susceptibility was found for S. epidermidis isolates at surgery start compared to after two hours.

CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that skin bacteria are present in the wound and may contaminate surgical graft material during cardiac surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2023
Keywords
Antibiotic prophylaxis, Cardiac surgery, Cutibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Surgical site infection
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105315 (URN)10.1016/j.jhin.2023.03.018 (DOI)000984052600001 ()37004786 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152892469 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Nyckelfonden, OLL-934809Region Örebro County
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved
Sagerfors, S., Edslev, S., Lindblad, B. E., Lilje, B., Stegger, M. & Söderquist, B. (2023). What targeted sequencing can tell us, that culture cannot: The corneal microbiome in infectious keratitis. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), New Orleans, LA, USA, April 23-27, 2023. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 64(8), Article ID 3293.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What targeted sequencing can tell us, that culture cannot: The corneal microbiome in infectious keratitis
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2023 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 64, no 8, article id 3293Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe the corneal microbiome in infectious keratitis in relation to contact lens wear or not, and culture outcome. To explore if targeted sequencing may provide information concerning: i) culture negative episodes, ii) variables influencing culture outcome of corneal samples dispensed in transport medium.

Methods: Prospective inclusion of patients fulfilling predefined criteria of infectious keratitis. Corneal samples were dispensed in liquid Amies medium, from which both culture and targeted sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene were carried out. Additional standard corneal culture was also performed. Main outcome measures were bacterial findings by targeted sequencing in relation to contact lens wear and culture outcome, and identification of variables influencing corneal culture outcome of indirectly inoculated corneal samples, using quantitative data from the PCR.

Results: In all, 94 episodes of infectious keratitis were included, of which 70 (74%) had bacterial growth on corneal culture. In median, 15 (range 8-30) different bacterial genera per episode of infectious keratitis were detected by targeted sequencing. The contact lens wearers (69/94; 73%) displayed significant (p=0.01) differences in the bacterial community composition of the corneal lesion compared to non-wearers, with higher abundance of Staphylococcus spp. Corynebacterium spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Among the culture negative episodes (n=24) Brevundimonas was found to be significantly (adjusted p<0.05) enriched. Sequencing detected a potential corneal pathogen such as Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas and Veillonella, with a relative abundance of at least 20% in more than half of the culture negative episodes (14/24; 58%). Bacterial density in the sample had the highest impact on culture outcome (OR 6.3; p=0.009) but also age increased the odds for a positive culture outcome (OR 1.04; p=0.034), while prior antibiotic treatment significantly reduced the odds of a positive corneal culture to a fifth (OR 0.2; p=0.031).

Conclusions: Targeted sequencing can provide a potential corneal pathogen in case of a negative culture outcome in patients with infectious keratitis, as well as providing insights on the corneal microbiome of infectious keratitis and factors influencing its composition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, 2023
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109672 (URN)001053795601249 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), New Orleans, LA, USA, April 23-27, 2023
Available from: 2023-11-14 Created: 2023-11-14 Last updated: 2023-11-14Bibliographically approved
Sid Ahmed, M., Khan, F. A., Hadi, H. A., Skariah, S., Sultan, A. A., Salam, A., . . . Jass, J. (2022). Association of blaVIM-2, blaPDC-35, blaOXA-10, blaOXA-488 and blaVEB-9 β-Lactamase Genes with Resistance to Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Ceftolozane-Tazobactam in Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiotics, 11(2), Article ID 130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of blaVIM-2, blaPDC-35, blaOXA-10, blaOXA-488 and blaVEB-9 β-Lactamase Genes with Resistance to Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Ceftolozane-Tazobactam in Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa
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2022 (English)In: Antibiotics, ISSN 0066-4774, E-ISSN 2079-6382, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam are approved for the treatment of complicated Gram-negative bacterial infections including multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Resistance to both agents has been reported, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. This study aimed to correlate β-lactamases with phenotypic resistance to ceftazidime-avibactam and/or ceftolozane-tazobactam in MDR-P. aeruginosa from Qatar. A total of 525 MDR-P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from clinical specimens between 2014 and 2017. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility were performed by the BD PhoenixTM system and gradient MIC test strips. Of the 75 sequenced MDR isolates, 35 (47%) were considered as having difficult-to-treat resistance, and 42 were resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam (37, 49.3%), and/or ceftolozane-tazobactam (40, 53.3%). They belonged to 12 sequence types, with ST235 being predominant (38%). Most isolates (97.6%) carried one or more β-lactamase genes, with blaOXA-488 (19%) and blaVEB-9 (45.2%) being predominant. A strong association was detected between class B β-lactamase genes and both ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam resistance, while class A genes were associated with ceftolozane-tazobactam resistance. Co-resistance to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam correlated with the presence of blaVEB-9, blaPDC-35, blaVIM-2, blaOXA-10 and blaOXA-488. MDR-P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to both combination drugs were associated with class B β-lactamases (blaVIM-2) and class D β-lactamases (blaOXA-10), while ceftolozane-tazobactam resistance was associated with class A (blaVEB-9), class C (blaVPDC-35), and class D β-lactamases (blaOXA-488).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
P. aeruginosa, PDC-35, VEB-9, antimicrobial resistance, ceftazidime–avibactam, ceftolozane–tazobactam, β-lactamases
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-97696 (URN)10.3390/antibiotics11020130 (DOI)000777762800001 ()35203733 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123252331 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 219-2014-837
Note

Funding agencies:

Medical Research Centre at Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar IRGC-0151-033

Qatar National Research Fund (Qatar Foundation) NPRP grant NPRP12S-0219-190109

Available from: 2022-03-01 Created: 2022-03-01 Last updated: 2022-04-19Bibliographically approved
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