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Lidskog, Rolf, professorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6735-0011
Publications (10 of 163) Show all publications
Lidskog, R. & Standring, A. (2023). Accountability in the environmental crisis: From microsocial practices to moral orders. Environmental Policy and Governance, 33(6), 583-592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accountability in the environmental crisis: From microsocial practices to moral orders
2023 (English)In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 583-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The global environmental crisis is the result of a complex web of causation and distributed agency, where not even the most powerful individual actors can be considered responsible nor remedy the situation alone. This has prompted multiple calls across societies for transformative social change. What role can accountability play in this context? Starting in the theoretical traditions of microsociology and pragmatic sociology, this article elaborates the role of accountability in social interactions. To provide an account that justifies an action or inaction is here understood as a process of social ordering, where accounts are assessed as acceptable only after they have been tested against higher normative principles. Microsocial practices are, in this way, linked to macrosocial order. The following section turns to the global environmental crisis, showing that the crisis raises normative as well as epistemic challenges. The complexity of the socio-environmental situation makes it hard to know what should be done and opens normative orders and epistemic claims to contestation. This situation provides increased opportunities for strategic maneuvering to justify actions as well as opportunities to question social practices and social order. The article concludes by discussing the role of accountability in climate change. Accountability can serve as a mechanism to attach issues to the current environmental crisis and re-embed decisions and practice in an environmental moral order. As part of a broader palette of instruments, rules and norms, accountability has an important function to play in transforming society towards sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Research Press, 2023
Keywords
accountability, climate change, environmental crisis, justification, moral orders, transformative changehange
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110091 (URN)10.1002/eet.2083 (DOI)001108194400001 ()2-s2.0-85175721405 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2022‐02503
Available from: 2023-12-07 Created: 2023-12-07 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, K. M. & Lidskog, R. (2023). Expertise for policy-relevant knowledge: IPBES’s epistemic infrastructure and guidance to make environmental assessment. Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, 20(1), Article ID 2187844.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expertise for policy-relevant knowledge: IPBES’s epistemic infrastructure and guidance to make environmental assessment
2023 (English)In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 2187844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organizations conducting global environmental assessments (GEAs) face the challenge of not only producing trustworthy and policy-relevant knowledge but also recruiting and training experts to conduct these GEAs. These experts must acquire the skills and competencies needed to produce knowledge assessments. By adopting an institutional approach, this paper explores IPBES’s epistemic infrastructure that aims to communicate and form the expertise that is needed to conduct its assessments. The empirical material consists of IPBES’s educational material, which teaches new experts how to perform the assessment. The analysis finds three crucial tasks that experts introduced in the assessments are expected to learn and perform. The paper concludes by discussing the broader importance of the findings that organizations that conduct GEAs are not passive intermediaries of knowledge but instead, through their epistemic infrastructure, generate ways to understand and navigate the world, both for those who create and those who receive the assessment report.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Epistemic infrastructure, epistemic culture, expertise, global environmental assessments, IPBES
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105092 (URN)10.1080/1943815x.2023.2187844 (DOI)000950277500001 ()2-s2.0-85150530813 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-01235Swedish Research Council, 2018-01634
Available from: 2023-03-20 Created: 2023-03-20 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
White, J. M. & Lidskog, R. (2023). Pluralism, paralysis, practice: Making environmental knowledge usable. Ecosystems and People, 19(1), Article ID 2160822.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pluralism, paralysis, practice: Making environmental knowledge usable
2023 (English)In: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 2160822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, the global environmental science-policy interface has come to include a greater variety of knowledge. Social scientists have joined natural scientists at the policy table, and Indigenous and local knowledge is being taken ever more seriously. But this pluralisation raises political, normative, and epistemic challenges for environmental expert organisations, including with respect to how knowledge is managed, how it is judged to be valid, how it is made policy-relevant, and how it is presented to policy-makers and decision-takers. Based on an interview study of experts involved in the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), we identify three broad approaches to these challenges: the integrationist logic, which seeks to combine all knowledge into a single ontology; the parallelist, which looks for similarities and connections between irreconcilable ontologies; and the pragmatist, which strives to apply knowledge when and where it will have the greatest positive impact. Rather than champion any one of these approaches, the paper explores their origins and how they negotiate paralyses to the timeliness of work. In avoiding ultimate formalisation of how value and knowledge pluralism are to be handled, IPBES allow more contextually sensitive practices to come to the fore. The paper concludes by discussing implications for environmental expertise more broadly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Usable knowledge, knowledge pluralism, knowledge systems, science-policy interface, expertise, IPBES
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102961 (URN)10.1080/26395916.2022.2160822 (DOI)000907823100001 ()2-s2.0-85145863711 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-01235
Available from: 2023-01-05 Created: 2023-01-05 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R. (2023). Risk och krisberedskap i det moderna samhället. Plan. Tidskriften för samhällsplanering (3), 30-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk och krisberedskap i det moderna samhället
2023 (Swedish)In: Plan. Tidskriften för samhällsplanering, ISSN 0032-0560, no 3, p. 30-35Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Framtiden dras alltmer in i dagens handlande där de flesta verksamheter numera är underkastade riskbedömningar. Rolf Lidskog efterlyser ett samtal om dess roll i samhällsplanering och politik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Föreningen för samhällsplanering, 2023
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109835 (URN)
Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-11-23Bibliographically approved
Asayama, S., De Pryck, K., Beck, S., Cointe, B., Edwards, P. N., Guillemot, H., . . . Hulme, M. (2023). Three institutional pathways to envision the future of the IPCC. Nature Climate Change, 13(9), 877-880
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three institutional pathways to envision the future of the IPCC
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2023 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 877-880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The IPCC has been successful at building its scientific authority, but it will require institutional reform for staying relevant to new and changing political contexts. Exploring a range of alternative future pathways for the IPCC can help guide crucial decisions about redefining its purpose.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Portfolio, 2023
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108122 (URN)10.1038/s41558-023-01780-8 (DOI)001063421300005 ()2-s2.0-85169836239 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work partly originates from a workshop organized by National Institute for Environmental Studies in April 2023, where S.A., K.D.P. and M.H. participated. S.A. acknowledges the financial support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Grants-in-Aid for Early-Career Scientists [20K20022]. M.H. acknowledges the financial support from the Department of Geography, University of Cambridge.

Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2023-11-01Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R. & Standring, A. (2022). COVID-19 and the environmental crises: Knowledge, social order and transformative change. In: Patrick R. Brown; Jens O. Zinn (Ed.), Covid-19 and the Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty: Studies of Social Phenomena and Social Theory Across 6 Continents (pp. 267-293). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COVID-19 and the environmental crises: Knowledge, social order and transformative change
2022 (English)In: Covid-19 and the Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty: Studies of Social Phenomena and Social Theory Across 6 Continents / [ed] Patrick R. Brown; Jens O. Zinn, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 267-293Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we critically analyse how the pandemic caused prior assumptions across both spatial and temporal boundaries to become questioned and reflect on important similarities, differences and relationships with more long-standing environmental concerns. Among the many, deep, social effects that the COVID-19 pandemic has had around the world, one that holds perhaps the greatest promise for lasting positive change—but which might also prove the most ephemeral—is that it has forced humans to re-evaluate their relationship to the environment and reconsider some deeply institutionalized social practices. The temporal character of the risk posed by both the pandemic and environmental crises, as well as the ways in which global and national risks are framed and perceived, has had an important impact on the nature and range of solutions offered. While the emphasis within the pandemic has been to ‘return to normal’ through a series of technical fixes—lockdowns, social measures, vaccines—these options are insufficient for the threats posed by environmental breakdown. In both cases, however, there has been a tendency among experts and policymakers to focus on the symptoms of the crises rather than their underlying causes. Transformative change necessitates a process of learning from crises; it entails a better understanding of what is knowable and unknowable and an appreciation of how crises are increasingly interrelated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022
Series
Critical Studies in Risk and Uncertainty, ISSN 2523-7268, E-ISSN 2523-7276
Keywords
Climate change, Environmental crisis, Expertise, Social learning, Transformative change
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99186 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-95167-2_11 (DOI)9783030951672 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-05-30 Created: 2022-05-30 Last updated: 2022-05-30Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R. & Löfmarck, E. (Eds.). (2022). En mänsklig natur: Risker, reglering och representationer. Örebro: Örebro universitet, sociologiämnet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>En mänsklig natur: Risker, reglering och representationer
2022 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Våra liv är präglade av våra sammanhang. Vad vi tänker, gör och känner är något vi utvecklat och utvecklar i nära samspel med andra personer och grupper. Det innebär att vi navigerar och agerar i tillvaron utifrån vilka vi är och önskar vara. Det innebär att även de frågor och mål som många gånger framställs som universella – som värdet av en god miljö – kännetecknas av olika och många gånger konfliktfyllda uppfattningar om hur de ska uttolkas och hur man når dit. Vår tillvaro utgörs av konkurrerande uppfattningar om vad som är ett gott och eftersträvansvärt liv, vad som är riskfyllt respektive säkert, vems råd man bör fästa tilltro till, vem eller vilka som bör ansvara för att skapa en god livsmiljö och ett gott samhälle. Såväl samhälle som natur är i denna bemärkelse mänskliga skapelser, befolkade med organisationer, professioner, grupper och människor som tänker, känner och vill olika saker.

Ylva Uggla, professor i sociologi vid Örebro universitet, har i sin forskargär­ning utvecklat och tillämpat kunskap om expertis, risk och miljö, många gånger på oväntade områden. I denna festskrift till Ylva medverkar tolv fors­kare som på olika sätt haft förmånen att möta och samarbeta med Ylva. I sina kapitelbidrag berör de frågor som är centrala för Ylvas forskning såsom natur och kultur, expertis och rådgivning, individualisering och miljöansvar, nutida risker och framtida möjligheter. Boken vill inspirera till fortsatt utforskande om hur risker definieras, expertis utvecklas och gränser dras i samhället – men den är framför allt en hyllning till en respekterad sociolog och kollega.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, sociologiämnet, 2022. p. 193
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99159 (URN)9789187789649 (ISBN)9789187789632 (ISBN)
Note

Festskrift till Ylva Uggla

Available from: 2022-05-24 Created: 2022-05-24 Last updated: 2022-05-30Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R., Standring, A. & White, J. M. (2022). Environmental expertise for social transformation: Roles and responsibilities for social science. Environmental Sociology, 8(3), 255-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental expertise for social transformation: Roles and responsibilities for social science
2022 (English)In: Environmental Sociology, ISSN 2325-1042, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 255-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What role should social science play in the work for transforming society towards sustainability? The background for this question is that despite massive investments in environmental research and the accumulation of data on the human impact on the environment, action remains insufficient. The severity of the current situation has led to the conclusion that moderate change is not enough; there is a need for a fundamental transformative change of society. How social science expertise should contribute to this is a fundamental epistemic and normative question and is the point of departure for this paper. This paper aims to develop a theory of social scientific environmental expertise. It first gives a broad account of expertise and its current landscape. It then develops a pluralistic approach, where expertise can take many forms, but should be reflexive, critical, and constructive. Finally, it stresses the crucial role that social science expertise has to play in the work for transformative change, not least to broaden environmental problems and their complexities, so that society is better equipped to undergo sustainable transformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Expertise, IPBES, IPCC, Science-policy interface, transformative change
National Category
Sociology Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-97857 (URN)10.1080/23251042.2022.2048237 (DOI)000764975500001 ()2-s2.0-85126001817 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-01634Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-01235
Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Lidskog, R. & Berg, M. (2022). Expertise, lay/local knowledge and the environment. In: Luigi Pellizzoni; Emanuele Leonardi; Viviana Asara (Ed.), Handbook of Critical Environmental Politics: (pp. 257-269). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expertise, lay/local knowledge and the environment
2022 (English)In: Handbook of Critical Environmental Politics / [ed] Luigi Pellizzoni; Emanuele Leonardi; Viviana Asara, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022, p. 257-269Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As an epistemic authority providing valid knowledge and measures for handling current environmental problems or preventing new ones from occurring, environmental expertise is a crucial factor in regulation and in the development of environmental discourses. At the same time, scientific expertise is also questioned; its capacity to deliver both trustworthy and relevant knowledge is contested. This situation constitutes the point of departure for this chapter, which critically discusses the meaning and implications of environmental expertise. Starting with an exploration of current trends within, and challenges to, expertise, it discusses why expertise needs to comprise other forms of knowledge than only scientific ones. It presents several theoretical proposals for tackling the situation of contested expertise, all of which stress the need to re-draw the boundaries between experts and non-experts. The chapter investigates how these proposals differ in terms of who, what, why and how to include non-scientific knowledge. By way of conclusion, it raises questions about the role of expertise in the current quest for social transformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022
Series
Elgar handbooks in energy, the environment and climate change
Keywords
boundary work, democratised science, expertise, lay expertise, public inclusion, science, social transformation.
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102671 (URN)10.4337/9781839100673.00026 (DOI)9781839100666 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-12 Created: 2022-12-12 Last updated: 2022-12-13Bibliographically approved
White, J. M. & Lidskog, R. (2022). Ignorance and the regulation of artificial intelligence. Journal of Risk Research, 25(4), 488-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ignorance and the regulation of artificial intelligence
2022 (English)In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 488-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much has been written about the risks posed by artificial intelligence (AI). This article is interested not only in what is known about these risks, but what remains unknown and how that unknowing is and should be approached. By reviewing and expanding on the scientific literature, it explores how social knowledge contributes to the understanding of AI and its regulatory challenges. The analysis is conducted in three steps. First, the article investigates risks associated with AI and shows how social scientists have challenged technically-oriented approaches that treat the social instrumentally. It then identifies the invisible and visible characteristics of AI, and argues that not only is it hard for outsiders to comprehend risks attached to the technology, but also for developers and researchers. Finally, it asserts the need to better recognise ignorance of AI, and explores what this means for how their risks are handled. The article concludes by stressing that proper regulation demands not only independent social knowledge about the pervasiveness, economic embeddedness and fragmented regulation of AI, but a social non-knowledge that is attuned to its complexity, and inhuman and incomprehensible behaviour. In properly allowing for ignorance of its social implications, the regulation of AI can proceed in a more modest, situated, plural and ultimately robust manner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Artificial intelligence, risk regulation, ignorance, non-knowledge
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-93432 (URN)10.1080/13669877.2021.1957985 (DOI)000682375700001 ()2-s2.0-85112599698 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-09 Created: 2021-08-09 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6735-0011

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