oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 208) Show all publications
Stattin, H., Seiffge-Krenke, I., Hendry, L., Kloep, M. & Beyers, W. (2018). Adolescent psychopathology in times of change: Introduction to the special issue. Journal of Adolescence, 65, 228-230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent psychopathology in times of change: Introduction to the special issue
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 65, p. 228-230Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this special issue is to understand better the many changes in adolescent psychopathology have taken place over the last decades. The factors associated with adjustment problems and psychopathology in adolescence today are not necessarily the same as the factors that predicted problems and psychopathology in the past. But the basic strategies for connecting negative experiences with adolescent psychopathology remain as important today as they were for understanding adolescent psychopathology decades ago. This is well exemplified in the studies included in this Special Issue. What all this studies have in common is that parenting and the family environment are assumed to play a key role in adolescents' adjustment and psychopathology. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 15th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference in included in this introduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Adolescent psychopathology; Societal changes; EARA 2016
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66445 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2018.03.006 (DOI)000432512300023 ()29606359 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044529142 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

EARA Council

Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Sun, S., Korol, L., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2018). Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47(6), 1151-1163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1151-1163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Social Work Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64044 (URN)10.1007/s10964-017-0795-0 (DOI)000431400400002 ()29294224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85039864223 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 201500282
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Kim, Y. (2018). Both parents and adolescents project their own values when perceiving each other’s values. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 42(1), 106-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both parents and adolescents project their own values when perceiving each other’s values
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 106-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How parents and adolescents perceive each other’s life values is a key to understanding successful value transmission. In the value socializations literature, it has been proposed that parents’ values become internalized when children correctly perceive their parents’ values and decide to adopt them as their own. In the current study, we propose that interpersonal value perception of broader life values is characterized by a perceptual bias—projection—which propels adolescents to perceive their parents’ values to be similar to their own, and propels parents to perceive their adolescents’ values to be similar to theirs. This cross-sectional study examined 518 dyads of adolescents and their parents. Adolescents rated how important different humanistic, environmental, and achievement values were to them, and how important these values were to their parents. Parents similarly rated how important these values were to them and to their adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, an interpersonal value perception model was constructed that estimated how much parents and adolescents projected their own values when perceiving each other’s values. The results supported the idea that both parents and adolescents substantially project their own values when perceiving the others’ values, and that they perceive the others’ values with low accuracy. We discuss our findings in light of value socialization in both research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
adolescents, interpersonal perception, life values, parents, projection, value transmission, values
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62767 (URN)10.1177/0165025417713728 (DOI)000417792400012 ()2-s2.0-85037738739 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Skoog, T. (2018). Pubertal timing. In: M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Arterberry, K.L. Fingerman, & J.E. Lansford (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development: . Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pubertal timing
2018 (English)In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development / [ed] M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Arterberry, K.L. Fingerman, & J.E. Lansford, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54219 (URN)9781506307657 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-02 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Latina, D. (2018). The severity and spread of adjustment problems of adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with others. Journal of Adolescence, 63, 51-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The severity and spread of adjustment problems of adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with others
2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 63, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the literature, bully-victims report a wider range of adjustment problems than “pure” bullies or victims. This may not be confined to the school context, but might be found in other settings as well. Involvement in mutually hostile interactions across everyday settings may more reflect adolescents' characteristic way of handling conflicts with others. We used data from a longitudinal study of a community sample of adolescents (N = 992). Cluster analyses for specific everyday settings and across settings yielded clusters high on both exposing others and being exposed to hostility. Adolescents in these clusters, and particularly across settings, reported a wider range of externalizing, internalizing, and academic problems, than adolescents in other cluster groups. Longitudinal analyses showed support for bidirectional relationships between mutually hostile conditions and problematic adjustment. We conclude that adolescents' mutual hostility experiences are associated with profoundly problematic adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents, hostility, mutual hostility, adjustment problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, school adjustment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63905 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.10.007 (DOI)000425483800006 ()29272767 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038881561 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-01-07 Created: 2018-01-07 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Martínez-Ferrer, B. & Stattin, H. (2017). A Mutual Hostility Explanation for the Co-Occurrence of Delinquency and Depressive Mood in Adolescence. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 45(7), 1399-1412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mutual Hostility Explanation for the Co-Occurrence of Delinquency and Depressive Mood in Adolescence
2017 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 1399-1412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Different interpersonal experiences are related to delinquency and depressive mood. In many studies, delinquency has been associated with exposing others to hostility, while depressive mood has been associated with being a victim of others' hostility. In this study, we proposed that adolescents with a co-occurrence of high delinquency and depressive mood may be both perpetrators and victims in their relations with parents at home, peers and teachers at school, and other people encountered in leisure time. We studied a normative sample of 1452 mid-adolescents (50.61% boys and 49.38% girls). Cluster analyses found a group with a co-occurrence of high delinquency and high depressive mood. Adolescents in this cluster group were highest on being exposed to hostility, exposing others to hostility, and being involved in mutually hostile interactions with others in different everyday contexts. The findings were especially strong when we examined being a victim and a perpetrator across contexts. The results were similar for boys and girls. We conclude that the co-occurrence of high delinquency and depressive mood among some adolescents is intimately linked to the mutually hostile interactions that these adolescents experience in their everyday interpersonal contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Adolescence, delinquency, depression, hostility, victim, perpetrator
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54102 (URN)10.1007/s10802-016-0245-6 (DOI)000411154500011 ()27943065 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85003815225 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Council for Working Life and Social Science of Sweden  2004-1981 

Spanish Government  2012-33464 

Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2017-10-03Bibliographically approved
Latina, D. & Stattin, H. (2017). Adolescents Who Self-Harm: The Patterns in Their Interpersonal and Psychosocial Difficulties. Journal of research on adolescence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents Who Self-Harm: The Patterns in Their Interpersonal and Psychosocial Difficulties
2017 (English)In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We proposed that having mutually hostile interactions with others is a strong environmental stress factor that, together with diverse psychosocial problems, characterizes adolescents who self-harm. Using cluster analysis, this study examined the naturally occurring patterns of hostility conditions and psychosocial difficulties in a normative sample of 2,029 adolescents (50% boys; Mage  = 13.89). Results showed that self-harming behavior was significantly higher among the subgroup of adolescents with mutually hostile interactions who exhibited both internalizing and externalizing problems than among adolescents with other interpersonal-psychosocial configurations. Also, this subgroup of adolescents reported high impulsivity, anger dysregulation, and low self-esteem. These findings support recent research that indicates that adolescents who self-harm also tend to expose others to hostility and display externalizing symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63996 (URN)10.1111/jora.12368 (DOI)29266559 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Latina, D. (2017). Att vara både förövare och offer för andras aggressivitet i ungdomsåldern. BestPractice Psykiatri / Neurologi (30), 16-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att vara både förövare och offer för andras aggressivitet i ungdomsåldern
2017 (Swedish)In: BestPractice Psykiatri / Neurologi, no 30, p. 16-18Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: BestPractice, 2017
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62766 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Hiatt, C., Laursen, B., Stattin, H. & Kerr, M. (2017). Best friend influence over adolescent problem behaviors: Socialized by the satisfied. Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), 46(5), 695-708
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Best friend influence over adolescent problem behaviors: Socialized by the satisfied
2017 (English)In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 695-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study was designed to examine best friend influence over alcohol intoxication and truancy as a function of relative perceptions of friendship satisfaction. The participants were 700 adolescents (306 boys, 394 girls) who were involved in same-sex best friendships that were stable from one academic year to the next. Participants completed self-report measures of alcohol intoxication frequency and truancy at 1-year intervals. Each member of each friendship dyad also rated his or her satisfaction with the relationship. At the outset, participants were in secondary school (approximately 13-14 years old) or high school (approximately 16-17 years old). More satisfied friends had greater influence than less satisfied friends over changes in intoxication frequency and truancy. Problem behaviors of less satisfied friends increased over time if the more satisfied friend reported relatively higher, but not relatively lower, initial levels of drinking or truancy. The results support the hypothesis that adolescent friends are not similarly influential. The power to socialize, for better and for worse, rests with the partner who has a more positive perception of the relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46925 (URN)10.1080/15374416.2015.1050723 (DOI)000408100100007 ()26135745 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

U.S. National Institute of Mental Health MH58116

U.S. National Science Foundation 0923745

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2017-09-15Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2017). Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors. Child Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors
2017 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine whether ethnic harassment was related to violent behaviors among immigrant youth over time and to identify the risk factors. The sample comprised immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (N = 365; Mage  = 13.93, SD = 0.80). Results showed that the more youth were ethnically harassed, the more they engaged in violent acts over time. A separated identity significantly moderated the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's engagement in violent behaviors. Specifically, ethnic harassment positively predicted engagement in violent behaviors only at high levels of separated identity. Impulsivity and school ethnic composition did not act as moderators. The findings suggest that preventing violent behaviors among immigrant youth requires a focus on promoting positive interethnic relationships, and multicultural identity among immigrant youth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62425 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12975 (DOI)29023668 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7546-2275

Search in DiVA

Show all publications