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Strandberg, T. & Simpson, G. (2020). An Audit of Literature Reviews Published in Australian Social Work (2007-2017). Australian Social Work, 73(1), 18-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Audit of Literature Reviews Published in Australian Social Work (2007-2017)
2020 (English)In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 18-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the nature of literature reviews published in Australian Social Work between 2007 and 2017. An audit was conducted to determine the number of reviews; types of reviews (systematic, meta-analysis, metasynthesis, scoping, narrative, conceptual, critical); and elements that were commonly reported (based on items drawn from the PRISMA checklist) including quality appraisal. A total of 21 reviews were identified. Results showed the overall number of reviews published remained relatively consistent across the decade. In relation to review types, systematic and scoping reviews appeared with greater frequency in more recent years. Most reviews reported significant proportions of the elements consistent with the type of review undertaken, although a minority did not report the search strategies and only one review included a quality appraisal. In conclusion, the reviews published over the last decade provide a strong foundation upon which further advances in the diversity and quality of reviews can be built.

IMPLICATIONS

  • Literature reviews are an indispensable tool for accessingknowledge to inform social work practice.
  • This first audit of literature reviews in Australian Social Work found a growing sophistication in the reviews published over the pastdecade.
  • Continued improvements in the design, conduct, and reporting of literature reviews will be an invaluable resource in equipping the profession to respond successfully to the growing complexity of demands placed on social work practice in the 21st century.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Review, Scoping Review, Systematic Review, Social Work, Quality Appraisal
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78643 (URN)10.1080/0312407X.2019.1571619 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Kristoffersson, E. & Strandberg, T. (Eds.). (2019). Ageing in a changing society: Interdisciplinary popular science contributions from the Newbreed research school (1ed.). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing in a changing society: Interdisciplinary popular science contributions from the Newbreed research school
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2019. p. 141 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79269 (URN)978-91-87789-33-5 (ISBN)
Projects
Newbreed forskarskola
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-02-13Bibliographically approved
(2019). Rehabilitering för vuxna med traumatisk hjärnskada: En systematisk översikt och utvärdering av medicinska, ekonomiska, sociala och etiska aspekter. Stockholm: SBU
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rehabilitering för vuxna med traumatisk hjärnskada: En systematisk översikt och utvärdering av medicinska, ekonomiska, sociala och etiska aspekter
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2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: SBU, 2019. p. 160
Series
SBU Utvärderar ; 304
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Rehabilitation Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79711 (URN)9789188437464 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Matérne, M., Strandberg, T. & Lundqvist, L.-O. (2019). Risk Markers for Not Returning to Work Among Patients with Acquired Brain Injury: A Population-Based Register Study. Journal of occupational rehabilitation, 29(4), 728-739
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Markers for Not Returning to Work Among Patients with Acquired Brain Injury: A Population-Based Register Study
2019 (English)In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 728-739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate person-related, injury-related, activity-related and rehabilitation-related risk markers for not return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Methods: Retrospective data from the Quality register, WebRehab Sweden, on an ABI cohort of 2008 patients, was divided into two groups: those who had returned to work (n = 690) and those who had not returned to work (n = 1318) within a year of the injury.

Results: Risk ratio analyses showed that several factors were risk markers for not returning to work: personal factors, including being a woman, being born outside of Sweden, having a low education level, and not having children in the household; injury-related factors, including long hospital stay (over 2 months), aphasia, low motor function, low cognitive function, high pain/discomfort, and high anxiety/depression; activity-related factors, including low function in self-care, inability to perform usual activities, and not having a driver's license; and rehabilitation-related factors, including being dissatisfied with the rehabilitation process and the attentiveness of the staff having limited influence over the rehabilitation plan, or not having a rehabilitation plan at all. Conclusion Several factors in different aspects of life were risk markers for not returning to work among patients with ABI. This suggests that rehabilitation and interventions need to address not only direct injury-related issues, but also person-related, activity-related, and rehabilitation-related factors in order to increase the patient's opportunities to return to work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Brain Injuries, Employment, Registries, Rehabilitation, vocational, Return to work
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73202 (URN)10.1007/s10926-019-09833-6 (DOI)000495099300008 ()30830502 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062704247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, L.-O., Matérne, M. & Strandberg, T. (2019). Risk markers for not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury. In: : . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Social Work in Health and Mental Health: Shaping the future. Promoting human rights and social perspectives in health and mental health, York, UK, July 22-26, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk markers for not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Research shows that variety of factors are related to risks of not returning to work among people with acquired brain injury (ABI). In Sweden, 40% of those with ABI in working age return to work within two years after the injury, which in line with international findings. However, since countries may differ in work rehabilitation, social security systems, culture and laws, different factors may influence the possibilities of returning to work across countries.

AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate person, injury, activity and rehabilitation related risk markers for not return to work among persons with ABI in Sweden.

METHODS: Retrospective data of an ABI cohort of 2008 people from the WebRehab Sweden quality register were used.

RESULTS: Analyses showed that the risk ratio for not returning to work was larger for people that, among the Personal factors, were woman, born outside of Sweden, had low education level, and not having children in the household; among the injury related factors, had long (> 2 months) hospital stay, aphasia, low motor function, low cognitive function, high pain/discomfort, and high anxiety/depression; among the activity related factors, had low function in self-care, inability to perform usual activities, and had their driver´s license suspended; and finally among the rehabilitation related factors, were satisfied with treatment and having influence over their rehabilitation plan.

DISCUSSION / CONCLUSION: Several factors in different areas were risk markers for not returning to work among people with ABI. This suggest that work rehabilitation and interventions, in addition to direct injury related issues, need to address personal related, activity related and rehabilitation related factors in order to increase the patient´s possibility to return to work. Influences of general and country specific factors on returning to work among people with ABI will be discussed.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78642 (URN)
Conference
9th International Conference on Social Work in Health and Mental Health: Shaping the future. Promoting human rights and social perspectives in health and mental health, York, UK, July 22-26, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, J., Strandberg, T., Berg, H.-Y. & Aretun, Å. (2019). Welfare consequences for individuals whose driving licenses are withdrawn due to visual field loss: A Swedish example. Journal of Transport and Health, 14, Article ID 100591.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Welfare consequences for individuals whose driving licenses are withdrawn due to visual field loss: A Swedish example
2019 (English)In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 14, article id 100591Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77444 (URN)10.1016/j.jth.2019.100591 (DOI)000487982100049 ()2-s2.0-85068748172 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Transport Agency 

Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, T. (2018). Case management – relationsarbete inom rehabilitering av personer med förvärvad hjärnskada (1ed.). In: Anders Bruhn & Åsa Källström (Ed.), Relationer i socialt arbete: i gränslandet mellan profession och person (pp. 233-247). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case management – relationsarbete inom rehabilitering av personer med förvärvad hjärnskada
2018 (Swedish)In: Relationer i socialt arbete: i gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Anders Bruhn & Åsa Källström, Stockholm: Liber , 2018, 1, p. 233-247Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Att förvärva en hjärnskada i vuxen ålder innebär en livsomställning som för de allra flesta medför behov av stöd i form av rehabiliteringsinsatser för att kunna återgå till ett fungerande vardagsliv. Rehabiliteringen kan utformas på många olika sätt och det finns ingen naturlig samordning av rehabiliteringsinsatser. På senare år har vi dock kunnat se att samhället rest krav på att rehabiliteringsaktörer måste samordna sina insatser. Det har bland annat uttryckts i Samordnad individuell plan (SIP) och i Individuell plan (IP) och är lagstadgat, samt i författningen om Samordning av insatser för habilitering och rehabilitering (SOSFS 2007:10). Inom rehabiliteringen för personer med förvärvad hjärnskada har även behovet av en samordnad vårdkedja artikulerats inom det akuta, det subakuta såväl som det sena skedet. Enligt Socialstyrelsen (2012) finns särskilda samordningsresurser endast i ett fåtal landsting/regioner. Detta kapitel kommer att fokusera på en stöd- och samordningsfunktion, case management, för personer som i vuxen ålder förvärvat en hjärnskada.

Inom hjärnskaderehabiliteringen har det under den senaste tiden införts case managers, eller i Sverige så kallade hjärnskadekoordinatorer, i syfte att vara en oberoende stöd- och resursperson för den som förvärvat en hjärnskada och dennes anhöriga. En övergripande målsättning med denna stödform är att tillsammans med den skadade och dennes anhöriga samordna och koordinera samhällets olika vård- och omsorgsinsatser. Syftet med kapitlet är att beskriva denna stödform med särskilt fokus på relationsarbetet mellan case managern och klienten med förvärvad hjärnskada eller dennes anhöriga.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2018 Edition: 1
Keywords
Relationer, socialt arbete, rehabilitering Case managemet
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63910 (URN)978-91-47-11311-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, T. (2018). Case-management – rehabilitation support after Acquired Brain Injury: with the aim to strengthen empowerment. In: FORSA/NOUSA – Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at Power and Social Work - Nordic Social Work Conference FORSA/NOUSA, University of Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018 (pp. 18-18).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case-management – rehabilitation support after Acquired Brain Injury: with the aim to strengthen empowerment
2018 (English)In: FORSA/NOUSA – Nordic Social Work Conference 2018: Book of Abstracts, 2018, p. 18-18Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Approximately 70 000 acquire a brain injury yearly in Sweden which often result in disabilities. Acquired brain injury (ABI) can be caused by trauma, stroke or disease. The rehabilitation process is divided into acute and subacute phase and the late stage. Studies shows that clients with moderate and severe injuries have difficulties in coordinating rehabilitation and societal support. Rehabilitation can be a long-term process and clients with ABI are often referred to next of kin for coordinating societal support, e.g. rehabilitation and social services. Case-management have since 1980’s been a rehabilitation support in an international perspective, but in a Swedish context it is a relatively new form of support.

The aim is to describe, based on a book chapter (Strandberg 2018), how this form of support has been developed in Sweden, as well as putting the form of support in relation to the client’s empowerment.

The results show that there are different theoretical models for how Case-management can be organized, the support is designed differently in different countries and context. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the support may be helpful to the client as well as the next of kin in terms of participation.

Although, Case-management has been known since 1980s, the scientific studies are limited and there is no evidence for the clinical significance using this support. Research is therefore necessary to demonstrate its clinical significance.

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work; Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71104 (URN)
Conference
Power and Social Work - Nordic Social Work Conference FORSA/NOUSA, University of Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, T. (2018). Case-management – rehabilitation support for people with Acquired Brain Injury. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Social Work Conference (FORSA/NOUSA 2018), Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case-management – rehabilitation support for people with Acquired Brain Injury
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Approximately 70 000 acquire a brain injury yearly in Sweden which often result in disabilities. Acquired brain injury (ABI) can be caused by trauma, stroke or disease. The rehabilitation process is divided into acute and subacute phase and the late stage. Studies shows that clients with moderate and severe injuries have difficulties in coordinating rehabilitation and societal support. Rehabilitation can be a long-term process and clients with ABI are often referred to next of kin for coordinating societal support, e.g. rehabilitation and social services. Case-management have since 1980’s been a rehabilitation support in an international perspective, but in a Swedish context it is a relatively new form of support.

The aim is to describe, based on a book chapter (Strandberg 2018), how this form of support has been developed in Sweden, as well as putting the form of support in relation to the client’s empowerment.

The results show that there are different theoretical models for how Case-management can be organized, the support is designed differently in different countries and context. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the support may be helpful to the client as well as the next of kin in terms of participation.

Although, Case-management has been known since 1980s, the scientific studies are limited and there is no evidence for the clinical significance using this support. Research is therefore necessary to demonstrate its clinical significance.

National Category
Social Work Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Work; Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70320 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Social Work Conference (FORSA/NOUSA 2018), Helsinki, Finland, November 21-23, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-24 Created: 2018-11-24 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Matérne, M., Strandberg, T. & Lundqvist, L.-O. (2018). Change in quality of life in relation to returning to work after acquired brain injury: a population-based register study. Brain Injury, 32(13-14), 1731-1739
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Change in quality of life in relation to returning to work after acquired brain injury: a population-based register study
2018 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 32, no 13-14, p. 1731-1739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This study investigated changes in quality of life (QoL) in relation to return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

METHOD: The sample consisted of 1487 patients with ABI (63% men) aged 18-66 years (mean age 52) from the WebRehab Sweden national quality register database. Only patients who worked at least 50% at admission to hospital and were on full sick leave at discharge from hospital were included. QoL was measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire.

RESULTS: Patients who returned to work perceived a larger improvement in QoL from discharge to follow-up one year after injury compared to patients who had not returned to work. This difference remained after adjustment for other factors associated with improved QoL, such as having a university education, increased Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale scores and getting one's driving licence reinstated.

CONCLUSION: Return to work is an important factor for change in QoL among patients with ABI, even after adjusting for other factors related to QoL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that having employment is meaningful, increases self-esteem and fosters participation in society. Thus, helping patients with ABI return to work has a positive influence on QoL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Stroke, life satisfaction, rehabilitation, traumatic brain injury, vocational rehabilitation
National Category
Neurology Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69466 (URN)10.1080/02699052.2018.1517224 (DOI)000453393600016 ()30296173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054574457 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Sweden

Available from: 2018-10-09 Created: 2018-10-09 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4578-0501

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