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Tuvblad, C., Sild, M., Frogner, L. & Booij, L. (2019). Behavioral Genetics of Aggression and Intermittent Explosive Disorder. In: Emil Coccaro, Michael McCloskey (Ed.), Intermittent Explosive Disorder: Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment. Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral Genetics of Aggression and Intermittent Explosive Disorder
2019 (English)In: Intermittent Explosive Disorder: Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment / [ed] Emil Coccaro, Michael McCloskey, Academic Press, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72624 (URN)9780128138588 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Tuvblad, C., Wang, P., Patrick, C. J., Berntsen, L., Raine, A. & Baker, L. A. (2019). Genetic and environmental influences on disinhibition, boldness, and meanness as assessed by the triarchic psychopathy measure in 19-20-year-old twins. Psychological Medicine, 49(9), 1500-1509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental influences on disinhibition, boldness, and meanness as assessed by the triarchic psychopathy measure in 19-20-year-old twins
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2019 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1500-1509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM) provides Disinhibition, Boldness, and Meanness scales for assessing the three trait domains of the triarchic model. Here we examined the genetic and environmental etiology of these three domains, including evaluation of potential sex differences.

Methods: A total of 1016 men and women ages 19–20 years were drawn from the University of Southern California Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior twin study.

Results: Scores for the three TriPM scales were correlated to differing degrees, with the strongest phenotypic correlation between Disinhibition and Meanness. No sex differences were found in the genetic and environmental influences underlying these three domains, suggesting that the same genes and life experiences contribute to these traits in young men and women. For TriPM Disinhibition and Boldness, genetic factors explained about half or less of the variance, with the rest of the variance being explained by non-shared environmental factors. For TriPM Meanness, on the other hand, genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental factors accounted for the variance. The phenotypic correlation between Disinhibition and Meanness was explained in part by common genes (26%), with the remainder attributable about equally to common shared (39%), and non-shared environmental influences (35%).

Conclusions: These findings contribute to our understanding of psychopathic personality traits by demonstrating the importance of heritable factors for disinhibition and boldness facets of psychopathy, and the importance of shared environmental influences for the meanness facet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
Boldness, disinhibition, heritability, meanness, psychopathy, TriPM, twins
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72365 (URN)10.1017/S0033291718002052 (DOI)000474922400009 ()30160231 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053012350 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

NIMH  K02 MH01114-08

Available from: 2019-02-10 Created: 2019-02-10 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
Silventoinen, K., Tuvblad, C. & Kaprio, J. (2019). Parental Education and Genetics of BMI from Infancy to Old Age: A Pooled Analysis of 29 Twin Cohorts. Obesity, 27(5), 855-865
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental Education and Genetics of BMI from Infancy to Old Age: A Pooled Analysis of 29 Twin Cohorts
2019 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 855-865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to analyze how parental education modifies the genetic and environmental variances of BMI from infancy to old age in three geographic-cultural regions.

METHODS: A pooled sample of 29 cohorts including 143,499 twin individuals with information on parental education and BMI from age 1 to 79 years (299,201 BMI measures) was analyzed by genetic twin modeling.

RESULTS: Until 4 years of age, parental education was not consistently associated with BMI. Thereafter, higher parental education level was associated with lower BMI in males and females. Total and additive genetic variances of BMI were smaller in the offspring of highly educated parents than in those whose parents had low education levels. Especially in North American and Australian children, environmental factors shared by co-twins also contributed to the higher BMI variation in the low education level category. In Europe and East Asia, the associations of parental education with mean BMI and BMI variance were weaker than in North America and Australia.

CONCLUSIONS: Lower parental education level is associated with higher mean BMI and larger genetic variance of BMI after early childhood, especially in the obesogenic macro-environment. The interplay among genetic predisposition, childhood social environment, and macro-social context is important for socioeconomic differences in BMI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73579 (URN)10.1002/oby.22451 (DOI)000465255700021 ()30950584 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063874197 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationSwedish Research Council, 340-2013-5867Stockholm County Council
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Fröberg, S., Patrick, C. J. & Tuvblad, C. (2019). The Role of the Startle Reflex in Psychopathic Personality from Childhood to Adulthood: A Systematic Review. In: : . Paper presented at 8th Biennial Conference of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, May 2-5, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of the Startle Reflex in Psychopathic Personality from Childhood to Adulthood: A Systematic Review
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74657 (URN)
Conference
8th Biennial Conference of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, May 2-5, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Liu, J., Wong, K.-Y. K., Dong, F., Raine, A. & Tuvblad, C. (2019). The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire - Child (SPQ-C): Psychometric properties and relations to behavioral problems with multi-informant ratings. Psychiatry Research, 275, 204-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire - Child (SPQ-C): Psychometric properties and relations to behavioral problems with multi-informant ratings
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2019 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 275, p. 204-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) is one of the most widely used screening tools for schizotypy in adults. The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Child version (SPQ-C) was recently developed to assess schizotypy in children and has a similar three-factor structure to the adult SPQ (i.e., Cognitive-Perceptual, Interpersonal-Affective, and Disorganization). However, few studies to date have reported on the psychometric properties and the usefulness of the SPQ-C in Eastern populations, including Mainland China. This study presents the first psychometric assessment of the Chinese SPQ-C in Mainland China. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the factor structure of the SPQ-C in 1668 children (M = 12.10, SD = 0.60 years) from the China Jintan Child Cohort Study. Our findings document a three-factor structure and partial measurement invariance across residential location and gender, replicating the psychometric properties of the SPQ-C in English. The Chinese SPQ-C further correlates with standard behavioral problems (i.e., Child Behavior Checklist, Youth Self-Report and Teacher Report Form), demonstrating construct validity and utility as a child psychopathology assessment tool. Our findings provide the first robust psychometric evidence for a three-factor structure of the Chinese SPQ-C in a large Mainland Chinese sample, and suggest that the SPQ-C is suitable as a screening tool for schizotypy in community children who may be at risk for behavioral problems and later psychosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Behavior problems, Child, Chinese, Externalizing, Internalizing, Psychometric analysis, Schizotypal personality disorder, Schizotypy
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74210 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2019.03.006 (DOI)000469156400029 ()30928723 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063466117 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-01041
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences  

National Institutes of Health  R01-ES-018858  K02-ES-019878  K01-ES015877 

Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Vrettou, M., Nilsson, K. W., Tuvblad, C., Rehn, M., Åslund, C., Andershed, A.-K., . . . Comasco, E. (2019). VGLUT2 rs2290045 genotype moderates environmental sensitivity to alcohol-related problems in three samples of youths. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>VGLUT2 rs2290045 genotype moderates environmental sensitivity to alcohol-related problems in three samples of youths
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2019 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The importance of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 (VGLUT2)-mediated neurotransmission has been highlighted in studies on addiction-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2290045 in VGLUT2 has been associated with alcohol dependence, but it is unknown whether or how this association is affected by environmental factors. The present study determined whether the association of alcohol-related problems with the rs2290045 in the VGLUT2 gene was modified by negative and positive environmental factors. Three samples were included: a clinical sample of 131 adolescents followed from age 17 to 22; a general population sample of 1794 young adults; and a general population sample of 1687 adolescents followed from age 14 to 17. DNA was extracted from saliva and the rs2290045 (T/C) was genotyped. Alcohol-related problems were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Stressful life events (SLE) and parenting were assessed by questionnaires. Gene-environment interactions were investigated using a dual statistical approach. In all samples (effect sizes 0.6-6.2%), and consistent with the differential susceptibility framework, T carriers exposed to SLE reported more alcohol-related problems if they had experienced poor parenting, and lower alcohol-related problems if they had received supportive parenting. T carriers not exposed to SLE reported higher alcohol-related problems if they had received supportive parenting and lower alcohol-related problems if they had received poor parenting. Among CC carriers, alcohol-related problems did not vary as a function of negative and positive environmental factors. In conclusion, in three samples of youths, alcohol-related problems were associated with an interaction of VGLUT2 rs2290045, SLE, and parenting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol, Gene, Glutamate, Stress, VGLUT2
National Category
Psychiatry Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72879 (URN)10.1007/s00787-019-01293-w (DOI)30805764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Tuvblad, C., Kuja-Halkola, R., Chen, Q. & Larsson, H. (2018). Genetic overlap between ADHD and externalizing, internalizing and neurodevelopmental disorder symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Paper presented at 48th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association (BGA), Boston, USA, June 20-23, 2018. Behavior Genetics, 48(6), 455-456
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic overlap between ADHD and externalizing, internalizing and neurodevelopmental disorder symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2018 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 455-456Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder (Wilens, Biederman & Spencer 2002) and affects approximately 5% of children (Polanczyk, de Lima, Horta, Biederman & Rohde 2007). About half of those diagnosed in childhood continue to have the diagnosis and symptoms in adulthood (Kessler et al. 2006). The co-occurrence of ADHD with other psychiatric disorder symptoms (Burt et al. 2001; Cole et al. 2009; Polderman et al. 2014) has been suggested to be partly explained by a shared genetic vulnerability (Polderman et al. 2014). However, the strength of the genetic overlap is currently unclear. Also, no study has examined whether the genetic correlations differs between age groups (childhood versus adulthood), by rater (self-report, other informant, combined (parent-teacher, parent-twin, teacher-twin)), or by type of psychiatric disorder symptoms (externalizing, internalizing, neu-rodevelopmental). To address this gap, we conducted a systematic literature search to identify relevant twin studies, in PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE. A total of 31 articles were identified and included in the present study. The pooled estimates showed that the comorbidity between ADHD and diverse psychiatric disorder symptoms were explained by shared genetic effectsrg= 0.50 (0.43–0.56). A similar shared genetic overlap between ADHD and psychiatric disorder symptoms was observed in both childhood rg= 0.51(0.42–0.61) and adulthood rg= 0.47 (0.40–0.53). Similar results werealso found for self-reports rg= 0.49 (0.42–0.55), other informants rg= 0.50 (0.40–0.60), and combined raters rg= 0.51 (0.30–0.69). Further, the strength of the genetic correlations of ADHD with the externalizing rg= 0.49 (0.39–0.59), internalizing rg= 0.55 (0.40–0.68) and neurodevelopmental rg= 0.47 (0.40–0.53) spectrums were similar in magnitude. These findings emphasize the presence of a shared genetic liability between ADHD and externalizing, internalizing and neurodevelopmental disorder symptoms, independent of age and rater.

References

Burt, S. A., Krueger, R. F., McGue, M., Iacono, W. G. (2001).Sources of covariation among attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder: the importance ofshared environment.Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 4, 516–525.

Cole, J., Ball, H. A., Martin, N. C., Scourfield, J., McGuffin, P.(2009). Genetic overlap between measures of hyperactivity/inatten-tion and mood in children and adolescents.J Am Acad Child AdolescPsychiatry48, 1094–1101.

Kessler, R. C., Adler, L., Barkley, R., Biederman, J., Conners, C.K., Demler, O., Faraone, S. V., Greenhill, L. L., Howes, M. J., Secnik,K., Spencer, T., Ustun, T. B., Walters, E. E., Zaslavsky, A. M. (2006).The prevalence and correlates of adult ADHD in the United States:results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.Am JPsychiatry, 163, 716–723.

Polanczyk, G., de Lima, M. S., Horta, B. L., Biederman, J., Rohde,L. A. (2007). The worldwide prevalence of ADHD: a systematicreview and metaregression analysis.Am J Psychiatry, 164, 942-8.

Polderman, T. J., Hoekstra, R. A., Posthuma, D., Larsson, H.(2014). The co-occurrence of autistic and ADHD dimensions inadults: an etiological study in 17,770 twins.Transl Psychiatry2014;4: e435.

Wilens, T. E., Biederman, J., Spencer, T. J. (2002). Attentiondeficit/hyperactivity disorder across the lifespan.Annual Review Med53:113–131.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Psychology Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70209 (URN)000448359800011 ()
Conference
48th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association (BGA), Boston, USA, June 20-23, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Younan, D., Tuvblad, C., Franklin, M., Lurmann, F., Li, L., Wu, J., . . . Chen, J.-C. (2018). Longitudinal Analysis of Particulate Air Pollutants and Adolescent Delinquent Behavior in Southern California. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 46(6), 1283-1293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Analysis of Particulate Air Pollutants and Adolescent Delinquent Behavior in Southern California
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1283-1293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animal experiments and cross-sectional human studies have linked particulate matter (PM) with increased behavioral problems. We conducted a longitudinal study to examine whether the trajectories of delinquent behavior are affected by PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) exposures before and during adolescence. We used the parent-reported Child Behavior Checklist at age 9-18 with repeated measures every ~2-3 years (up to 4 behavioral assessments) on 682 children from the Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior Study conducted in a multi-ethnic cohort of twins born in 1990-1995. Based on prospectively-collected residential addresses and a spatiotemporal model of ambient air concentrations in Southern California, monthly PM2.5 estimates were aggregated to represent long-term (1-, 2-, 3-year average) exposures preceding baseline and cumulative average exposure until the last assessment. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between PM2.5 exposure and individual trajectories of delinquent behavior, adjusting for within-family/within-individual correlations and potential confounders. We also examined whether psychosocial factors modified this association. The results sμggest that PM2.5 exposure at baseline and cumulative exposure during follow-up was significantly associated (p < 0.05) with increased delinquent behavior. The estimated effect sizes (per interquartile increase of PM2.5 by 3.12-5.18 μg/m3) were equivalent to the difference in delinquency scores between adolescents who are 3.5-4 years apart in age. The adverse effect was stronger in families with unfavorable parent-to-child relationships, increased parental stress or maternal depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings sμggest long-term PM2.5 exposure may increase delinquent behavior of urban-dwelling adolescents, with the resulting neurotoxic effect aggravated by psychosocial adversities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Adolescence, Delinquency, Ambient fine particles, Environmental exposures, Epidemiologic studies, Longitudinal studies
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63405 (URN)10.1007/s10802-017-0367-5 (DOI)000438531100012 ()29234991 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037742868 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences  R21 ES022369  F31 ES025080 

Southern California Environmental Health Sciences Center  5P30ES007048 

National Institute of Mental Health  R01 MH058354 

Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Younan, D., Li, L., Tuvblad, C., Wu, J., Lurmann, F., Franklin, M., . . . Chen, J.-C. (2018). Long-Term Ambient Temperature and Externalizing Behaviors in Adolescents. American Journal of Epidemiology, 187(9), 1931-1941
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Ambient Temperature and Externalizing Behaviors in Adolescents
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 187, no 9, p. 1931-1941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The climate-violence relationship has been debated for decades, and yet most of the supportive evidence came from ecological or cross-sectional analyses with very limited long-term exposure data. We conducted an individual-level, longitudinal study to investigate the association between ambient temperature and externalizing behaviors of urban-dwelling adolescents. Participants (n = 1,287) of the Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior Study were examined in 2000-2012 (aged 9-18 years) with repeated assessments of their externalizing behaviors (aggression; delinquency). Ambient temperature data were obtained from the local Meteorological Information System. In adjusted multi-level models, aggressive behaviors significantly increased with rising average temperatures (per 1°C-increment) in preceding 1-3 years (β = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.00, 0.46; β = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.63; β = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.74; respectively), equivalent to 1.5-3 years of delay in age-related behavioral maturation. These associations were slightly stronger among girls and families of lower socioeconomic status, but greatly diminished in neighborhoods with higher greenspace. No significant associations were found with delinquency. Our study provides the first individual-level epidemiologic evidence supporting the adverse association of long-term ambient temperature and aggression. Similar approaches to studying meteorology and violent crimes may further inform scientific debates on climate change and collective violence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Adolescence, aggression, ambient temperature, delinquency, environmental exposures, epidemiologic studies, longitudinal studies
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67102 (URN)10.1093/aje/kwy104 (DOI)000443542000013 ()29788079 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences  R21 ES022369  F31 ES025080  R01 ES025888 

Southern California Environmental Health Sciences Center  5P30ES007048 

National Institute of Mental Health  R01 MH058354 

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Tuvblad, C., Niv, S., Ashrafulla, S., Joshi, A., Raine, A., Leahy, R. & Baker, L. A. (2018). Relationships of Alpha, Beta, and Theta EEG Spectra Properties with Aggressive and Nonaqqressive Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents. American Journal of Psychology, 131(4), 429-437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships of Alpha, Beta, and Theta EEG Spectra Properties with Aggressive and Nonaqqressive Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0002-9556, E-ISSN 1939-8298, Vol. 131, no 4, p. 429-437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated potential correlations between underlying electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power and aggressive or nonaggressive antisocial behavior. Frontal and parietal EEG spectral properties were calculated for 3 different ranges (theta, 4-8 Hz; alpha, 8-10.5 Hz; and beta, 10.5-30 Hz) in 900 twins in an open-eyed resting state during 2 stages of development: ages 9-10 and ages 14-15. In multilevel regression modeling, relationships emerged between EEG spectral power properties and measures of antisocial behavior at age 14-15 years but not at the concurrent age of 9-10 years, providing support for neurodevelopmental underpinnings for adolescent-onset antisocial behavior. For boys, frontal alpha power, frontal beta power, and parietal beta power were correlated with aggressive antisocial behavior. For girls, parietal alpha power was anticorrelated with nonaggressive antisocial behavior, raising questions about differing neurobiological profiles for antisocial behavior between sexes. These results also support a distinction between aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Illinois Press, 2018
Keywords
EEG, aggressive, nonaggressive, child, adolescent
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70483 (URN)10.5406/amerjpsyc.131.4.0429 (DOI)000451003300003 ()
Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8768-6954

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