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Bergh, Cecilia
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Arevström, L., Bergh, C., Landberg, R., Wu, H., Rodriguez-Mateos, A., Waldenborg, M., . . . Fröbert, O. (2019). Freeze-dried bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) dietary supplement improves walking distance and lipids after myocardial infarction: an open-label randomized clinical trial. Nutrition Research, 62, 13-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Freeze-dried bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) dietary supplement improves walking distance and lipids after myocardial infarction: an open-label randomized clinical trial
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition Research, ISSN 0271-5317, E-ISSN 1879-0739, Vol. 62, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bilberries, Vaccinium myrtillus, have a high content of phenolic compounds including anthocyanins, which could provide cardiometabolic health benefits following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We hypothesized that standard medical therapy supplemented with freeze-dried bilberry after AMI would have a more beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk markers and exercise capacity than medical therapy alone. Patients were allocated in a 1:1 ratio within 24 hours of percutaneous coronary intervention in an 8-week trial either to V myrtillus powder (40 g/d, equivalent to 480 g fresh bilberries) and standard medical therapy or to a control group receiving standard medical therapy alone. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise capacity measured with the 6-minute walk test were the primary biochemical and clinical end points, respectively. Fifty subjects completed the study. No statistically significant difference in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was detected between groups. The mean 6-minute walk test distance increased significantly more in the bilberry group compared to the control group: mean difference 38 m at follow-up (95% confidence interval 14-62, P = .003). Ex vivo oxidized low-density lipoprotein was significantly lowered in the bilberry group compared to control, geometric mean ratio 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.66-0.96, P = .017), whereas total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol did not differ significantly between groups. Anthocyanin-derived metabolites in blood increased significantly in the bilberry group during the intervention and were different after 8 weeks between the bilberry group and control. Findings in the present study suggest that bilberries may have clinically relevant beneficial effects following AMI; a larger, double-blind clinical trial is warranted to confirm this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Anthocyanins, Bilberries, Cholesterol, Exercise test, Inflammation, Myocardial Infarction
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73342 (URN)10.1016/j.nutres.2018.11.008 (DOI)000460848800002 ()30803503 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058196483 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation

Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Bergh, C., Hiyoshi, A., Eriksson, M., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2019). Shared unmeasured characteristics among siblings confound the association of Apgar score with stress resilience in adolescence. Acta Paediatrica, 108(11), 2001-2007
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shared unmeasured characteristics among siblings confound the association of Apgar score with stress resilience in adolescence
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2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 2001-2007Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: We investigated the association between low Apgar score, other perinatal characteristics and low stress resilience in adolescence. A within-siblings analysis was used to tackle unmeasured shared familial confounding.

METHODS: We used a national cohort of 527,763 males born in Sweden between 1973 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments at mean age 18 years (17-20). Conscription examinations included a measure of stress resilience. Information on Apgar score and other perinatal characteristics was obtained through linkage with the Medical Birth Register. Analyses were conducted using ordinary least squares and fixed-effects linear regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS: Infants with a prolonged low Apgar score at five minutes had an increased risk of low stress resilience in adolescence compared to those with highest scores at one minute, with an adjusted coefficient and 95% confidence interval of -0.26 (-0.39, -0.13). The associations were no longer statistically significant when using within-siblings models. However, the associations with stress resilience and birthweight remained statistically significant in all analyses.

CONCLUSION: The association with low Apgar score seems to be explained by confounding due to shared childhood circumstances among siblings from the same family, while low birthweight is independently associated with low stress resilience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Apgar score, adolescence, low birth weight, psychological stress, resilience
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74554 (URN)10.1111/apa.14881 (DOI)000489595000011 ()31140196 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067475196 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden  OLL-507161

Grants to the International Centre for Life Course Studies  RES-596-28-0001, ES/JO19119/1

ALF research funding from Region Örebro County 

Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Bergh, C., Mohammad, M. A., Tham, J., Koul, S., Rylance, R., Erlinge, D. & Fröbert, O. (2019). Under the weather: acute myocardial infarction and subsequent case fatality with influenza burden - a nationwide observational study. Paper presented at ESC Congress / World Congress of Cardiology, Paris, France, August 31 - September 4, 2019. European Heart Journal, 40(Suppl. 1), 3994-3994
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Under the weather: acute myocardial infarction and subsequent case fatality with influenza burden - a nationwide observational study
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2019 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 40, no Suppl. 1, p. 3994-3994Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Influenza may precipitate cardiovascular disease but influenza typically peaks in winter coinciding with other triggers of myocardial infarction (MI) such as low air temperature, high wind velocity, low air pressure and short sunshine duration. We aimed to study week-to-week variation in influenza cases and acute MI after meteorological confounder adjustment in a nationwide setting.

Methods: Weekly laboratory-confirmed influenza case reports were obtained from the Public Health Agency of Sweden from 2009 to 2016 and merged with the nationwide SWEDEHEART MI registry. Weekly counts of MI were studied with regard to influenza cases stratified into tertiles, 0–16, 17–164 and>164 influenza cases/week. Incidence rate ratios were calculated for each category and compared to a reference period of the year with no influenza. A negative binomial regression model was applied to adjust for weather parameters.

Results: A total of 133 562 MIs were reported to the registry during the study period of which 44 055 were ST-elevation MIs. Weeks with influenza cases were associated with higher risk of MI. For 0–16 influenza cases/week the unadjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for MI was 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.07, p=0.007); for 17–163 cases/week the IRR=1.07 (95% CI 1.04–1.10, p≤0.001) and for≥164 cases/week the IRR=1.08 (95% CI 1.05–1.11, p≤0.001). Results were consistent across a large range of subgroups and after adjusting for confounders. In addition, all-cause mortality was higher in weeks with highest reported rates of influenza cases.

Conclusion: In this nationwide observational study, we found an association between occurrence of MI and number of influenza cases beyond what could be explained by meteorological factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79825 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehz746.0988 (DOI)000507313003650 ()
Conference
ESC Congress / World Congress of Cardiology, Paris, France, August 31 - September 4, 2019
Available from: 2020-02-06 Created: 2020-02-06 Last updated: 2020-02-06Bibliographically approved
Montgomery, S., Bergh, C., Udumyan, R., Eriksson, M., Fall, K. & Hiyoshi, A. (2018). Sex of older siblings and stress resilience. Longitudinal and life course studies, 9(4), 447-455
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex of older siblings and stress resilience
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2018 (English)In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate whether older siblings are associated with development of stress resilience in adolescence and if there are differences by sex of siblings. The study used a Swedish register-based cohort of men (n=664 603) born between 1970 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments in adolescence that included a measure of stress resilience: associations were assessed using multinomial logistic regression. Adjusted relative risk ratios (95% confidence intervals) for low stress resilience (n=136 746) compared with high (n=142 581) are 1.33 (1.30, 1.35), 1.65 (1.59, 1.71) and 2.36 (2.18, 2.54) for one, two and three or more male older siblings, compared with none. Equivalent values for female older siblings do not have overlapping confidence intervals with males and are 1.19 (1.17, 1.21), 1.46 (1.40, 1.51) and 1.87 (1.73, 2.03). When the individual male and female siblings are compared directly (one male sibling compared with one female sibling, etc.) and after adjustment, including for cognitive function, there is a statistically significant (p<0.005) greater risk for low stress resilience associated with male siblings. Older male siblings may have greater adverse implications for psychological development, perhaps due to greater demands on familial resources or inter-sibling interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 2018
Keywords
siblings, sex, psychological functioning, stress resilience, adolescence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69976 (URN)10.14301/llcs.v9i4.486 (DOI)000458728800005 ()2-s2.0-85061810166 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden  

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1 

Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Hiyoshi, A., Fall, K., Bergh, C. & Montgomery, S. (2017). Comorbidity trajectories in working age cancer survivors: A national study of Swedish men. Cancer Epidemiology, 48, 48-55, Article ID S1877-7821(17)30039-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity trajectories in working age cancer survivors: A national study of Swedish men
2017 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 48, p. 48-55, article id S1877-7821(17)30039-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cancer survivors are of working age, and maintaining health is of interest both for their working and private life. However, patterns and determinants of comorbidity over time among adult cancer survivors are incompletely described. We aimed to identify distinct comorbidity trajectories and their potential determinants.

METHODS: In a cohort study of Swedish men born between 1952 and 1956, men diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2003 (n=878) were matched with cancer-free men (n=4340) and followed over five years after their first year of survival. Comorbid diseases were identified using hospital diagnoses and included in the analysis using group-based trajectory modelling. The association of socioeconomic and developmental characteristics were assessed using multinomial logit models.

RESULTS: Four distinct comorbidity trajectories were identified. As many as 84% of cancer survivors remained at very low levels of comorbidity, and the distribution of trajectories was similar among the cancer survivors and the cancer-free men. Increases in comorbidity were seen among those who had comorbid disease at baseline and among those with poor summary disease scores in adolescence. Socioeconomic characteristics and physical, cognitive and psychological function were associated with types of trajectory in unadjusted models but did not retain independent relationships with them after simultaneous adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS: Among working-age male cancer survivors, the majority remained free or had very low levels of comorbidity. Those with poorer health in adolescence and pre-existing comorbid diseases at cancer diagnosis may, however, benefit from follow-up to prevent further increases in comorbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Adolescence, Cancer, Comorbidity, Longitudinal, Risk factor, Survivor, Trajectory
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57346 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2017.03.001 (DOI)000405151500008 ()28365446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016519311 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-2128
Note

Funding Agencies:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/J019119/1 

Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Montgomery, S., Hiyoshi, A., Bergh, C., Udumyan, R., Eriksson, M. & Fall, K. (2017). Foetal risks for low stress resilience are exacerbated by childhood exposures. In: : . Paper presented at Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies conference, Stirling, Scotland, UK, October 11-13, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foetal risks for low stress resilience are exacerbated by childhood exposures
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62928 (URN)
Conference
Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies conference, Stirling, Scotland, UK, October 11-13, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-02 Created: 2017-12-02 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Bergh, C. (2017). Life-course influences on occurrence and outcome for stroke and coronary heart disease. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life-course influences on occurrence and outcome for stroke and coronary heart disease
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Although typical clinical onset does not occur until adulthood, cardiovascular disease (CVD) may have a long natural history with accumulation of risks beginning in early life and continuing through childhood and into adolescence and adulthood. Therefore, it is important to adopt a life-course approach to explore accumulation of risks, as well as identifying age-defined windows of susceptibility, from early life to disease onset. This thesis examines characteristics in adolescence and adulthood linked with subsequent risk of CVD. One area is concerned with physical and psychological characteristics in adolescence, which reflects inherited and acquired elements from childhood, and their association with occurrence and outcome of subsequent stroke and coronary heart disease many years later. The second area focuses on severe infections and subsequent delayed risk of CVD. Data from several Swedish registers were used to provide information on a general population-based cohort of men. Some 284 198 males, born in Sweden from 1952 to 1956 and included in the Swedish Military Conscription Register, form the basis of the study cohort for this thesis. Our results indicate that characteristics already present in adolescence may have an important role in determining long-term cardiovascular health. Stress resilience in adolescence was associated with an increased risk of stroke and CHD, working in part through other CVD factors, in particular physical fitness. Stress resilience, unhealthy BMI and elevated blood pressure in adolescence were also associated with aspects of stroke severity among survivors of a first stroke. We demonstrated an association for severe infections (hospital admission for sepsis and pneumonia) in adulthood with subsequent delayed risk of CVD, independent of risk factors from adolescence. Persistent systemic inflammatory activity which could follow infection, and that might persist long after infections resolve, represents a possible mechanism. Interventions to protect against CVD should begin by adolescence; and there may be a period of heightened susceptibility in the years following severe infection when additional monitoring and interventions for CVD may be of value.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2017
Series
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 156
Keywords
cardiovascular disease, stroke, risk factors, adolescence, stress resilience, adult infections, life-course epidemiology, cohort study
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54254 (URN)978-91-7529-177-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-03-10, Örebro universitet, Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Södra Grev Rosengatan 32, Örebro, 09:30 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Bergh, C., Fall, K., Udumyan, R., Sjöqvist, H., Fröbert, O. & Montgomery, S. (2017). Severe infections and subsequent delayed cardiovascular disease. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 24(18), 1958-1966
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Severe infections and subsequent delayed cardiovascular disease
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 1958-1966Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Severe infections in adulthood are associated with subsequent short-term cardiovascular disease. Whether hospital admission for sepsis or pneumonia is associated with persistent increased risk (over a year after infection) is less well established.

Design: The design of this study was as a register-based cohort study.

Methods: Some 236,739 men born between 1952-1956 were followed from conscription assessments in adolescence to 2010. All-cause cardiovascular disease ( n = 46,754), including coronary heart disease ( n = 10,279) and stroke ( n = 3438), was identified through national registers 1970-2010 (at ages 18-58 years).

Results: Sepsis or pneumonia in adulthood (resulting in hospital admission) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the years following infection. The risk is highest during the first year after the infection, with an adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence intervals) of 6.33 (5.65-7.09) and a notably increased risk persisted with hazard ratios of 2.47 (2.04-3.00) for the second and 2.12 (1.71-2.62) for the third year after infection. The risk attenuated with time, but remained raised for at least five years after infection; 1.87 (1.47-2.38). The results are adjusted for characteristics in childhood, cardiovascular risk factors and medical history in adolescence. Similar statistically significant associations were found for coronary heart disease and stroke.

Conclusions: Raised risks of cardiovascular disease following hospital admission for sepsis or pneumonia were increased for more than five years after the infection, but with the highest magnitude during the first three years following infection, suggesting a period of vulnerability when health professionals and patients should be aware of the heightened risk for cardiovascular disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Adult infection, cardiovascular disease, risk factors, sepsis, stroke pneumonia
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59088 (URN)10.1177/2047487317724009 (DOI)000416007600008 ()28764553 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029233473 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
Montgomery, S., Bergh, C., Udumyan, R., Eriksson, M., Fall, K. & Hiyoshi, A. (2017). Sex of older siblings and cognitive function. In: : . Paper presented at 10th World Congress, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD 2017), Rotterdam, The Netherlands, October 15-18, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex of older siblings and cognitive function
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background : Number of older siblings is associated with lower cognitive function, possibly as marker of material disadvantage. Sex differences may signal an influence of inter-sibling interactions.

Methods: The study used a national Swedish register-based cohort of men (n=644,603), born between 1970 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments in adolescence that included cognitive function measured on a normally-distributed scale of 1-9. Associations with siblings were investigated using linear regression.

Results: After adjustment for numbers of younger siblings, year of conscription assessment, age/year of birth, sex, European socioeconomic classification for parents and maternal age at delivery; the regression coefficients (and 95% confidence intervals) for cognitive function are -0.26 (-0.27, -0.25), -0.42 (-0.44, -0.40), and -0.72 (-0.76, -0.67) for one, two and three or more male older siblings, respectively, compared with none; and -0.22 (-0.23, -0.21), -0.39 (-.41, -0.37), -0.62 (-0.67, -0.58) for one two and three or more female older siblings, respectively, compared with none. A larger number of younger siblings is not associated with lower cognitive function in the adjusted model.

Conclusions: Family size is associated with cognitive function: older male siblings may have greater implications than females due to their demands on familial resources or through inter-sibling interactions.

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60996 (URN)
Conference
10th World Congress, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD 2017), Rotterdam, The Netherlands, October 15-18, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-07-20Bibliographically approved
Montgomery, S., Bergh, C., Udumyan, R., Eriksson, M., Fall, K. & Hiyoshi, A. (2017). Sex of older siblings and cognitive function. In: : . Paper presented at Nobel Day's Festivities, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden December 7, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex of older siblings and cognitive function
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62929 (URN)
Conference
Nobel Day's Festivities, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden December 7, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-03 Created: 2017-12-03 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
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