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Quennerstedt, MikaelORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843
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Publications (10 of 150) Show all publications
McCuaig, L. & Quennerstedt, M. (2018). Health by stealth: exploring the sociocultural dimensions of salutogenesis for sport, health and physical education research. Sport, Education and Society, 23(2), 111-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health by stealth: exploring the sociocultural dimensions of salutogenesis for sport, health and physical education research
2018 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sport, health and physical education (SHPE) researchers have increasingly embraced the salutogenic model of health devised by Aaron Antonvosky, to re-understand and problematise the relation between movement, physical activity or physical education on one hand, and health on the other. However, contemporary research employing Antonovsky's theories has almost exclusively focused on the sense of coherence scale. In so doing, we suggest salutogenic researchers have missed opportunities to explore the sociological aspects of Antonovsky's work. In responding to this challenge, we demonstrate the generative possibilities posed by social theory for those seeking to inform and design salutogenically oriented SHPE programmes for children and young people. As such, we first review Antonovsky's theory of salutogenesis to highlight the sociocultural aspects of his model. We then draw on these sociocultural underpinnings to propose additional, alternative approaches to salutogenic research in SHPE, according to the theoretical and methodological tools devised by Michel Foucault [1990. The use of pleasure: The history of sexuality (Vol. 2, R. Hurley, Trans.). New York: Vintage Books]. In conclusion, we propose a schedule of research questions to inspire qualitative endeavours that move beyond privileged biomedical perspectives, to investigate health in terms of how individuals live a good life. In short, we contend that such investigations are best achieved when researchers approach ‘health by stealth’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Salutogenesis, health and physical education, research methodology, Foucault, ethics, healthy citizenship
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53839 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2016.1151779 (DOI)000435472400001 ()2-s2.0-84961216368 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Ericson, H., Quennerstedt, M., Skoog, T. & Johansson, M. (2018). Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 10(2), 206-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years
2018 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Health resources, exercise, resistance training, salutogenesis, older adults
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61946 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2017.1393453 (DOI)000431127700005 ()2-s2.0-85031919728 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Quennerstedt, M. (2018). Physical education and the art of teaching: Transformative learning and teaching in physical education and sport pedagogy. In: AIESEP World Congress: José María Cagigal Scholar Lecture. Paper presented at AIESEP World Congress, Edinburgh, UK, 25-28 July 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical education and the art of teaching: Transformative learning and teaching in physical education and sport pedagogy
2018 (English)In: AIESEP World Congress: José María Cagigal Scholar Lecture, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68348 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP World Congress, Edinburgh, UK, 25-28 July 2018
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Goodyear, V. A., Casey, A. & Quennerstedt, M. (2018). Social media as a tool for generating sustained and in-depth insights into sport and exercise practitioners’ ongoing practices. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 10(1), 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social media as a tool for generating sustained and in-depth insights into sport and exercise practitioners’ ongoing practices
2018 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to suggest and empirically illustrate how social media can be used to generate sustained and in-depth insights into sport and exercise practitioners’ ongoing practices. This is achieved by discussing the potential for social media in research designs and presenting an analysis of 6 physical education teachers’ and a researcher’s tweets during a six-year school-based continuous professional development programme. Through the use of empirical illustrations we suggest that social media promotes interflections i.e. an ongoing deliberation between practitioners and researchers facilitated by social media. The key contribution of this paper is the argument that social media offers researchers the opportunity to capture sustained and in-depth insights into practitioners and their practices and/or to examine longer-term impacts of programmes or interventions. The discussions are relevant to a range of practitioners within sport and exercise pedagogy, with teachers and teaching used as a representative example of this broad field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Twitter, social media, interviews, reflection, pedagogy, practitioners
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61956 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2017.1367715 (DOI)000429386700001 ()2-s2.0-85028566285 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Quennerstedt, M. (2017). Elevengagemang en fråga om lärande (1ed.). In: Almqvist, Hamza & Olin (Ed.), Undersöka och utveckla undervisning: professionell utveckling för lärare (pp. 179-180). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevengagemang en fråga om lärande
2017 (Swedish)In: Undersöka och utveckla undervisning: professionell utveckling för lärare / [ed] Almqvist, Hamza & Olin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 1, p. 179-180Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61960 (URN)978-91-44-11417-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2017-11-02Bibliographically approved
Whatman, S., Quennerstedt, M. & McLaughlin, J. (2017). Indigenous knowledges as a way to disrupt norms in physical education teacher education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Health, Sport and Physical Education, 8(2), 115-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous knowledges as a way to disrupt norms in physical education teacher education
2017 (English)In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Health, Sport and Physical Education, ISSN 1837-7122, E-ISSN 1837-7130, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The maintenance and reproduction of prevailing hegemonic norms have been well explored in physical education teacher education (PETE). A related problem has been the exclusion of Indigenous knowledges around health and physical education (HPE) in students’ experiences of HPE and PETE. The danger is that certain ways of being and becoming a PE teacher, other than the sporty, fit, healthy (and white) teacher, are excluded, positioning other preservice teachers’ experiences, knowledges and ways to teach as deficient. In this paper, we discuss findings from an investigation (Australian Office for Learning and Teaching CG10-1718) into the HPE practicum experiences of Indigenous Australian preservice teachers, illustrating the resources they bring to Australian HPE and PETE through the lens of John’s Dewey’s notion of growth and Todd’s [(2014). Between body and spirit: The liminality of pedagogical relationships. Journal of Philosophy of Education48(2), 231–245] ideas of liminality of pedagogical relations. This enables us to discuss Indigenous preservice teachers’ capacity in disrupting norms in HPE and fostering the liminality of the pedagogical relations in PETE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Indigenous knowledges, physical education, health and physical education (HPE), curriculum, pedagogy, norms, Dewey, physical education teacher education (PETE)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61958 (URN)10.1080/18377122.2017.1315950 (DOI)2-s2.0-85017685642 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Barker, D. & Quennerstedt, M. (2017). Power and group work in physical education: A Foucauldian perspective. European Physical Education Review, 23(3), 339-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Power and group work in physical education: A Foucauldian perspective
2017 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 339-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Group work is used in physical education (PE) to encourage student-directed, collaborative learning. Aligned with this aim, group work is expected to shift some power from teacher to students and enable students to make decisions and co-construct meaning on their own. There are, however, very few investigations focusing on power in group work situations in PE, with most research focusing on learning and content. Assumptions about the nature of power and its mechanisms have been largely implicit. The purpose of this paper was consequently to explore power relations in PE group work. To do this, we have drawn primarily on observational data of three groups working together to choreograph a dance performance in a Swedish PE lesson. A small amount of pre- and post-lesson interview material is used as a complementary data source. Michel Foucault’s notion of power as action-on-action is used to identify different types of power relations in this group work. Four specific kinds of relations are presented concerning: (1) the students’ task; (2) other cultures; (3) gender; and (4) interactions with one another. These relations suggest that power relations are not simply created locally between group members, nor are power relations only a function of the members’ proficiency in the task. In these respects, the results encourage a reconsideration of learning in group work and open up new avenues for further research. The paper is concluded with practical considerations that relate to common assumptions about student power, teacher authority and the potential benefit of ambiguous tasks in group work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Group work, power relations, interaction, Foucault
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53841 (URN)10.1177/1356336X15620716 (DOI)000405451900006 ()2-s2.0-85023769814 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-5182
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Barker, D., Wallhead, T. & Quennerstedt, M. (2017). Student learning through interaction in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 23(3), 273-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student learning through interaction in physical education
2017 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 273-278Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53842 (URN)10.1177/1356336X16640235 (DOI)000405451900001 ()2-s2.0-85023740643 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Larsson, H., Quennerstedt, M., Caldeborg, A., Janemalm, L., Ridderlund, S., Segolsson, J., . . . Öhman, M. (2017). Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!. In: : . Paper presented at British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61026 (URN)
Conference
British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017
Projects
Forskarskolan idrott och hälsas didaktik
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Gibbs, B., Quennerstedt, M. & Larsson, H. (2017). Teaching dance in physical education using exergames. European Physical Education Review, 23(2), 237-256
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching dance in physical education using exergames
2017 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the different ways in which a dance exergame can be used to teach dance in upper secondary school physical education. Particular attention is paid to the learning processes that students are involved in when the dance game is used as a teaching resource. A socio-cultural perspective on learning constitutes the analytical framework. The study demonstrates three different uses: instructor, facilitator and inspirer. In relation to these uses the students are involved in the following learning processes: learning by imitating, repeating, communicating, negotiating, instructing, modelling and using metaphors. It is argued that dance exergames can be used pedagogically to teach dance because they focus on the moves and steps and allow the teacher to focus on observing, supporting, assigning tasks and providing feedback.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Dance exergames, teaching resource, learning process, physical education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53840 (URN)10.1177/1356336X16645611 (DOI)000399752100007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 729-2011-5270
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843

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