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Quennerstedt, MikaelORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843
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Casey, A. & Quennerstedt, M. (2020). Cooperative learning in physical education encountering Dewey’s educational theory. European Physical Education Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative learning in physical education encountering Dewey’s educational theory
2020 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Cooperative learning can be considered as an umbrella term for a number of classroom practices. In this paper we consider the educative nature of cooperative learning in physical education, and we have challenged ourselves to examine how cooperative learning can enhance the education of young people. We do this by revisiting cooperative learning’s Deweyan foundations and hold that such a move would be a constructive way forward for cooperative learning in physical education. We argue that there is a risk, in not going back to its educational roots, that cooperative learning might just become another way to teach, for example, games or sports, and that it currently puts too much emphasis on destination rather than journey. We suggest that using Dewey’s idea of education and experience would add: a situational element, a directional element, a temporal element, a communal element and an educative element. In this way, the use of cooperative learning in physical education can move away from exclusively developing students’ skills, towards an open-ended process of becoming where a diversity of students transform and are being transformed by one another.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Growth, experience, social interdependence, pedagogical models, models-based practice
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80527 (URN)10.1177/1356336X20904075 (DOI)000514967100001 ()
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Goodyear, V. A. & Quennerstedt, M. (2020). #Gymlad: young boys learning processes and health-related social media. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 12(1), 18-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>#Gymlad: young boys learning processes and health-related social media
2020 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 18-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent systematic reviews identify that the factors mediating and/or moderating the relationship between social media and health outcomes are sparse. There have also been few attempts to analyse gender specific uses of social media. This paper investigated young boys health-related learning in relation to social media. Data were generated from class activities and interviews and from a large data set that included 1346 young people. The approach to the empirical data adopted was Practical Epistemology Analysis (PEA). The findings reveal two main purposes of young boys engagement with social media: (i) communicating with friends, and (ii) accessing health-related information. Irony and humour were central learning mechanisms used by young boys to participate within health-related social media, and in a way that enabled them to engage with, uphold, and handle health discourses associated with masculinity – such as being ripped – without fear of ‘literal’ peer ridicule and within a context of acceptable ‘banter’. There was evidence that young people were critical users and generators of social media, who were clearly thinking through what they see, do, and use online. Hence, this paper provides a fresh evidence-based perspective on the potentially positive role of social media as a health-related learning resource. PEA is illustrated as a new methodological approach for investigating learning in the context of social media. The evidence generated can be used to inform future evaluations of social media use, the design of educative support for young people, and guidance and training for key stakeholders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Workout, gym, Instagram, Snapchat, feedback, praise, likes
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77407 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2019.1673470 (DOI)000492377100001 ()2-s2.0-85074039300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 201601/Z/16/Z
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2020-01-13
Janemalm, L., Barker, D. & Quennerstedt, M. (2020). Transformation of complex movements from policy to practice: a discourse analysis of Swedish physical education teachers’ concepts of moving. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transformation of complex movements from policy to practice: a discourse analysis of Swedish physical education teachers’ concepts of moving
2020 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: How teachers enact policy has been of significant interest to educational scholars. In physical education research, scholars have identified several factors affecting the enactment of policy. These factors include but are not limited to: structural support available for teachers, provision of professional development opportunities, the nature of the policy, and the educational philosophies of the teachers. A recurring conclusion drawn in this scholarship is that official documentation and teachers’ work often diverge, sometimes in profound ways.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how physical education teachers in Sweden describe their enactment of policy regarding the concept complex movement, which features in the latest Swedish curriculum.

Methods: Interview data were generated with six specialist physical education teachers. Three questions guided the interviews: What is complex movement? What is not complex movement? And, can you give examples from your teaching of complex movement? Data were analyzed using a discourse analytic framework. Meaning was understood as a production of dialectical relationships between individuals and social practices. Two key concepts were utilized: intertextuality, which refers to the condition whereby all communicative events, not merely utterances, draw on earlier communication events, and interdiscursivity, which refers to discursive practices in which discourse types are combined in new and complex ways.

Results: We identified three discourses regarding the teachers’ enactment of policy: (1) Complex movement as individual difficulty, (2) Complex movement as composite movements, and (3) Complex movement as situational adaptation. Several features were common to all three discourses: they were all related to issues of assessment; they suggested that complex movement is something students should be able to show or perform, and; they left open room for practically any activity done in physical education to be considered complex.

Discussion: Three issues are addressed in the Discussion. The first concerns the intertextual nature of the teachers’ statements and how the statements relate to policy and research. The second concerns the way that knowledge, and specifically movement knowledge, becomes problematic in the teachers’ statements about complex movement. The third concerns more broadly the language used to describe the relationship between policy and practice.

Conclusions: We propose that modest levels of overlap between teachers’ discursive resources, policy, and research is unsurprising. In line with earlier research, we suggest that the notion of ‘enactment’ is a more productive way to describe policy-oriented practice than notions such as ‘implementation’ or ‘translation’, which imply a uni-directional, linear execution of policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Physical education, curriculum, complexity, discourse analysis
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80523 (URN)DOI: 10.1080/17408989.2020.1727869 (DOI)000514727400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03471
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Ward, G. & Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Curiosity killed by SATs: an investigation of mathematics lessons within an English primary school. Education 3-13, 47(3), 261-276
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Curiosity killed by SATs: an investigation of mathematics lessons within an English primary school
2019 (English)In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By taking both pupils’ and teachers’ actions as the point of departure, this study aimed to understand governance within a primary school classroom. Video footage was recorded in an English primary school in which mathematics happened to be the focus. This data was analysed to identify the directions of both governance and self-governance and to help understand the consequences for pupil and teacher subjectivities. Our findings revealed the central role of national testing and inspection policy in constituting staff as ‘evidence hunters’ and pupils as ‘confessant and unafraid producers of evidence’. Both staff and pupils were complicit in creating sufficient space for everyone to fulfil their obligation to be accountable to the school’s senior leadership team (SLT), school inspectors and national attainment tests. As a consequence, mathematical knowing was simplified into a discipline of reproducing testable calculation, in which other possibilities of mathematical knowing were foreclosed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Primary school, governance, Foucault, testing, inspection
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69986 (URN)10.1080/03004279.2018.1429479 (DOI)000470059200001 ()2-s2.0-85040978158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Maivorsdotter, N. & Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school. European Physical Education Review, 25(4), 1176-1192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school
2019 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio-recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakening them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Gender habits, digital technologies, exergames, youth, practical epistemology analysis
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70156 (URN)10.1177/1356336X18810023 (DOI)000486166500016 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Quennerstedt, M., McCuaig, L. & Mårdh, A. (2019). Fantasmatic logics of Physical Education. In: AIESEP, International Conference, 2019, Adelphi University: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at AIESEP International Conference, Adelphi University, New York, USA, June 19-22, 2019 (pp. 495-495).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fantasmatic logics of Physical Education
2019 (English)In: AIESEP, International Conference, 2019, Adelphi University: Book of Abstracts, 2019, p. 495-495Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Historically, physical education (PE) has embraced practices that promise an idealized scenario in terms of e.g moral and aesthetic development, and the building of national identity as in Ling gymnastics, or a healthy and fit population seeking to achieve national health objectives through exercise oriented programs (Kirk 2010, Tinning 2011). As Kirk and Tinning highlight, these practices are ideological and this presentation seeks to further explore the ideological workings of PE  with a particular focus on a more recent ‘seductive’ practice  – physical literacy.

In the presentation we draw on Glynos’s (2008) and Mårdh’s (2019) work on logics and ideology to explore the case of physical literacy, and to consider  what an approach that interrogates social,political and fantasmatic logics might reveal about PE practice. 

We begin with a brief overview of dominant PE practices, identifying the manner in which the logics of each practice has resulted in roads to closure and a movement towards ideology. Following this, we focus on physical literacy to investigate how this emerging practice might represent yet another road to closure. Here we provide illustrations from across the PE and sport community to identify the social and political logics that underpin this practice.

Specifically employing Glynos’ (2008) notion of beatific and horrific narratives , we then explore the sport, public health, and educative fantasmatic logics of physical literacy to reveal the shared ideological workings of this collection. Together, the logics show the increasing seduction of physical literacy and its operation as an all-inclusive grand narrative. In conclusion we discuss what is promised in the name of physical literacy and how its ever-expanding purview involves an over-investment in its beatific narratives regarding the physically literate citizen which, potentially, closes down opportunities to engage critically with this recent development in PE policy and practice.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78669 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP International Conference, Adelphi University, New York, USA, June 19-22, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Healthying physical education: on the possibility of learning health. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 24(1), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthying physical education: on the possibility of learning health
2019 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: As part of the annual activities at the British Educational Research Association (BERA) conference, the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Special Interest Group (SIG) organises a so-called Invisible College, where a Scholar Lecture is delivered by a researcher who has made a significant contribution to the field. This paper is the 2018 Scholar Lecture.

Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to discuss two concepts and the relations between them – health and learning.

Key concepts: In the paper, the metaphor of the swimmer in the river, as introduced by Antonovsky, is used in order to go beyond individualistic, dualistic and instrumental notions of health and education. I argue for a move away from a notion of teaching young people how to be healthy through the deployment of ready-made educational packages, towards acknowledging health education as a societal responsibility, where it is recognised that sociocultural and economic contexts afford diverse opportunities to be healthy and to learn to live healthy lives, however these are construed.

Discussion and conclusion: Rather than confining health and health education to the prevention of premature death and disease, I discuss health, in relation to learning, as always being in the process of becoming. The health resources for living a good life can then be found in the ‘river’, with the ‘swimmer’, and in the relation between the ‘river’ and the ‘swimmer’. In this way, health can manifest itself in many different ways. I ask why we even attempt to talk about health in the singular when talking about different diseases. Is health rather a plural? Is it even a noun? Or is it something we do – a verb? If the latter, health education can be conceived of as a practice – ‘healthying’ – rather than a fixed, static outcome set up by research and public health policies as something to achieve in education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Physical education, health, learning, health education, salutogenesis, scholar lecture
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70055 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2018.1539705 (DOI)000455999100001 ()2-s2.0-85055570290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Casey, A. & Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Missing in (trans)action: Cooperative learning in physical education and the unacknowledged contribution of John Dewey. In: BERA conference in Manchester 10-12 sept 2019: . Paper presented at BERA Annual Conference, Manchester, UK, September 10-12, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Missing in (trans)action: Cooperative learning in physical education and the unacknowledged contribution of John Dewey
2019 (English)In: BERA conference in Manchester 10-12 sept 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pedagogical models are increasingly part of the vocabulary and practice in physical education. They emerged from decades of innovation that seeks to end the dominance of direct instruction and multi-model curricula. They continue to evolve and that serves as a catalyst for our argument that Cooperative Learning lost a keystone of its development when it was brought into physical education.

Digging into the genesis of Cooperative Learning shows that it owes much of its early intellectual development to the work of John Dewey and Kurt Lewin (Schmuck, 1985). Indeed Cooperative Learning was ‘born’ out of both the epistemology of pragmatic philosophy (Dewey) and the positivist epistemology of developmental psychology (Lewin). However, over time, the legacy of Dewey’s work around cooperation has been marginalised, at best, in the body of work around Cooperative Learning in general education and is conspicuous by its near total absence in the physical education literature. Revisiting the 27 papers used by Casey and Goodyear (2015) in their review of literature shows that Dewey’s name does not appear in a single reference list. This paper seeks to redress the balance and argues that in applying a Deweyan lens of experience to Cooperative Learning we return to Lewin and Dewey shared interest and “pioneering spirit…to improve social interaction and cooperation in schools” (Schmuck, 1985, p. 2).

One of Dewey’s main contributions is his notion of education as growth. For Dewey education is the “reconstruction or reorganization of experience which adds to the meaning of experience” (1916: 76), and in these constructions the person experiencing, the experiencer, as well as what is experienced has a potential for change (Dewey & Bentley, 1949). Such change, however, is not fixed or completed. Instead it is a process of becoming which then promotes further experiences (Dewey, 1938a). Education then does not have an end beyond itself. It is about the conditions of education, and experiences are educative if they promote growth of still even more, richer experiences.

Cooperative learning as a pedagogical model should then be about “…the enterprise of supplying the conditions which insure growth” (Dewey, 1916: 61). This is not in terms of cooperating as a passive adaption into a set of predetermined contexts like for example competitive sports, but cooperating to ensure improved quality of future experiences. It should provide experiences that: “arouses curiosity, strengthens initiative, and sets up desires and purposes that are sufficiently intense to carry a person over the dead places” (Dewey, 1938b: 38).

Using Dewey we can also take critique directed towards cooperative learning seriously, for example, the inability to take power relations of the educational situation into account e.g. sexism, racism or homophobia. Here we turn to Shannon Sullivan’s (2001) use of Dewey’s notion of transaction to address this relative blindness and move beyond dualist notions of experience. Sullivan contends that:

Many times, the reconstruction of organism and environment through their ongoing transactional activity serves only to deepen the grooves of the transactions that came before. Because organism and environment are continually being remade through their transactional relationship, however, significant change is possible. (Sullivan, 2001, 36)

This, according to Sullivan, involves acknowledging continuity as well as difference in experience and in doing so cooperative learning has to be modelled to handle all students experiences since it is in the transaction between the students and the environment the model becomes the model it is.

In conclusion, by taking back Dewey’s ideas around experience and education into cooperative learning in physical education we could focus more on both the process of cooperating and the process of learning taking into account the diversity of students experiences in the complex transaction between content, teaching and learning.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78671 (URN)
Conference
BERA Annual Conference, Manchester, UK, September 10-12, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Physical education and the art of teaching: transformative learning and teaching in physical education and sports pedagogy. Sport, Education and Society, 24(6), 611-623
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical education and the art of teaching: transformative learning and teaching in physical education and sports pedagogy
2019 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 611-623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper is the Jose Maria Cagigal Scholar Lecture presented at the AIESEP World Congress in Edinburgh 2018. In the paper I argue that the only real sustainable aim for physical education is more physical education, where different ways of being in the world as some-body are both possible and encouraged. To reach this aim, a focus on the art of teaching is vital as a way of critically scrutinising and designing transformative and genuinely pluralistic physical education practices. In order to do this I discuss education as being educative, a certain view of the child as well as teaching as a continuous act of making judgements about the why(s), what(s) and how(s) of education, normative judgements about desirable change. The take home messages involves: (i) reclaiming a certain view of the child in education, (ii) reclaiming the open-endedness of physical education, and (iii) reclaiming the art of teaching in physical education, which is about being educative and making judgements about what to bring to the educational situation. We then must start with the purpose of education - the why - before deciding on the what and how.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Education, didaktik, teaching, learning, children
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74721 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2019.1574731 (DOI)000469133300006 ()2-s2.0-85066409283 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, Å., Quennerstedt, M., Maivorsdotter, N. & Meckbach, J. (2019). Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames. Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, 10, 251-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 251-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Department of Sport Sciences, Malmö University, 2019
Keywords
Exergaming, sensory ethnography, digitalization, methodology, learning
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78124 (URN)
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843

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