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Sato, Y., Hiyoshi, A., Melinder, C., Suzuki, C. & Montgomery, S. (2018). Asthma and atopic diseases in adolescence and antidepressant medication in middle age. Journal of Health Psychology, 23(6), 853-859
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma and atopic diseases in adolescence and antidepressant medication in middle age
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-1053, E-ISSN 1461-7277, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 853-859Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This Swedish register-based cohort study examined whether asthma, hay fever and allergic dermatitis in late adolescence identified in the early 1970s are associated with antidepressant medication in middle age, between 2006 and 2009. After adjustment for childhood and adulthood sociodemographic characteristics, psychological, cognitive and physical function, and comorbidity, the magnitude of the associations diminished for asthma, while hay fever and atopic dermatitis retained associations. Hay fever and atopic dermatitis in adolescence have potentially important implications for future mental health, while asthma may already have influenced an individual's ability to cope with stress by late adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Adolescence, adults, allergy, asthma, cohort, depression
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51473 (URN)10.1177/1359105316660181 (DOI)000430332700009 ()27466290 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045628411 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-01365
Note

Funding Agencies:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/J019119/1 

Japan Allergy Foundation  

Scandinavia-Japan Sasakawa Foundation  15-15 

Lindhes Advokatbyrå AB  LA2015-0219 

Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-02 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Cable, N., Hiyoshi, A., Kondo, N., Aida, J., Sjöqvist, H. & Kondo, K. (2018). Identifying Frail-Related Biomarkers among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan: A Research Example from the Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Study. BioMed Research International, Article ID 5362948.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying Frail-Related Biomarkers among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan: A Research Example from the Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Study
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2018 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 5362948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examined correlating clinical biomarkers for the physical aspect of frailty among community-dwelling older adults in Japan, using Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES). We used information from the JAGES participants (N = 3,128) who also participated in the community health screening in 2010. We grouped participants' response to the Study of Osteoporotic Fracture (SOF) Frailty Index into robust (=0), intermediate frail (=1), and frail (=2+) ones to indicate physical aspect of frailty. Independent of sex and age, results from multinomial logistic regression showed above normal albumin and below normal HDL and haemoglobin levels were positively associated with intermediate frail (RRR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.22-3.23; RRR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.33-1.39; RRR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.23-1.51, resp.) and frail cases (RRR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.91-2.70; RRR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.51-1.68; RRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.28-1.52, resp.). Limited to women, above normal Hb1Ac level was similarly associated with intermediate frail and frail cases (RRR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.38; RRR = 2.56, 95% CI = 2.23-2.95, resp.). Use of relevant clinical biomarkers can help in assessment of older adults' physical aspect of frailty.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64827 (URN)10.1155/2018/5362948 (DOI)000422965600001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  ES/J019119/1 

Research Committee of Orebro County Council  OLL-346981 

MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities  

JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) KAKENHI  JP22330172  JP22390400  JP23243070  JP23590786  JP23790710  JP24390469  JP24530698  JP24683018  JP25253052  JP25870573  JP25870881 

Health Labour Sciences Research Grants from the Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare  H22-Choju-Shitei-008  H24-Junkanki[Seishu]-Ippan-007  H24-Chikyukibo-Ippan-009  H24-Choju-Wakate-009  H25-Kenki-Wakate-015  H26-Irryo-Shitei-003[Fukkou]  H25-Choju-Ippan-003  H26-Choju-Ippan-006 

Research and Development Grants for Longevity Science from AMED (Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development)  

National Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Japan  24-17  24-23 

Available from: 2018-02-06 Created: 2018-02-06 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Hiyoshi, A., Kondo, N. & Rostila, M. (2018). Increasing income-based inequality in suicide mortality among working-age women and men, Sweden, 1990-2007: is there a point of trend change?. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 72(11), 1009-1015
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing income-based inequality in suicide mortality among working-age women and men, Sweden, 1990-2007: is there a point of trend change?
2018 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 1009-1015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Income inequalities have risen from the 1990s to 2000s, following the economic recession in 1994, but little research has investigated socioeconomic inequalities in suicide mortality for working-age men and women (aged between 30 and 64 years) over the time using longitudinal data in Sweden.

METHODS: Using Swedish national register data between 1990 and 2007 as a series of repeated cohort studies with a 3-year follow-up (sample sizes were approximately 3.7 to 4.0 million in each year), relative and slope indices of inequality (RII and SII respectively) based on quintiles of individual disposable income were calculated and tested for temporal trends.

RESULTS: SII for the risk of suicide mortality ranged from 27.6 (95% CI 19.5 to 35.8) to 44.5 (36.3 to 52.6) in men and 5.2 (0.2 to 10.4) to 16.6 (10.7 to 22.4) in women (per 100 000 population). In men, temporal trends in suicide inequalities were stable in SII but increasing in RII by 3% each year (p=0.002). In women, inequalities tended to increase in both RII and SII, especially after the late-1990s, with 10% increment in RII per year (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Despite universal social security and generous welfare provision, income inequalities in suicide were considerable and have widened, especially in women. The steeper rise in women may be partially related to higher job insecurity and poorer working conditions in the female dominated public sector after the recession. To reduce health consequences following an economic crisis and widened income inequalities, additional measures may be necessary in proportion to the levels of financial vulnerability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
cohort studies, health inequalities, socio-economic, suicide
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70021 (URN)10.1136/jech-2018-210696 (DOI)000450417500008 ()30021795 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, MEXT, Japan  21119002  25253052  18H04071 

Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan  H24-chikyukibo-ippan-009 

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lindner, H. Y., Hiyoshi, A. & Hermansson, L. (2018). Relation between capacity and performance in paediatric upper limb prosthesis users. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 42(1), 14-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relation between capacity and performance in paediatric upper limb prosthesis users
2018 (English)In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The International Classification of functioning, disability and health refers capacity to what an individual can do in a standardised environment and describes performance as what an individual really does and whether the individual encounters any difficulty in the real-life environment. Measures of capacity and performance can help to determine if there is any gap between them that may restrict participation. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between capacity scores obtained in a standardised clinical setting and proportional ease of performance obtained from a real-life environment.

METHODS: The Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control and the Prosthetic Upper Extremity Functional Index were used to assess capacity and performance in 62 prosthetic users (age 3-17). Spearman coefficient and generalised linear model were used to examine the association between these measures.

RESULTS: A strong correlation (Spearman = 0.75) was found between the capacity scores and the ease of performance. In both unadjusted and adjusted models, capacity was significantly associated with proportional ease of performance. The adjusted model showed that, by 1 unit increase in the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control score, the ratio of proportional ease of performance increases by 45%.

CONCLUSION: This implies that Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control can be a predictor for ease of performance in real-life environment.

Clinical relevance: The ACMC scores may serve as an indicator to predict the difficulties that the children may encounter in their home environment. This prediction can help the clinician to make decisions, such that if the child requires more control training or is ready to move on to learn more complex tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Upper limb prosthetics, prosthetics, rehabilitation, rehabilitation of prostheses users
National Category
Occupational Therapy Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59060 (URN)10.1177/0309364617704802 (DOI)000424669100003 ()28639478 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041794635 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Melinder, C., Hiyoshi, A., Kasiga, T., Halfvarson, J., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2018). Resilience to stress and risk of gastrointestinal infections. European Journal of Public Health, 28(2), 364-369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience to stress and risk of gastrointestinal infections
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 364-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Exposure to psychological stress can elicit a physiological response that may influence characteristics of the gastrointestinal mucosa, including increased intestinal permeability, in turn possibly increasing susceptibility to gastrointestinal infections. We investigated whether low stress resilience in adolescence is associated with an 'increased' risk of gastrointestinal infections in subsequent adulthood.

Methods: Data were provided by Swedish registers for a cohort of 237 577 men who underwent military conscription assessment in late adolescence (1969-76). As part of the assessment procedure, certified psychologists evaluated stress resilience through semi-structured interviews. The cohort was followed from conscription assessment until 31 December 2009 (up to age 57 years). Cox regression assessed the association of stress resilience with gastrointestinal infections (n = 5532), with adjustment for family background measures in childhood and characteristics in adolescence. Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) in adulthood was modelled as a time-dependent covariate.

Results: Compared with high stress resilience, lower stress resilience was associated with a 'reduced' risk of gastrointestinal infections after adjustment for family background in childhood, characteristics in adolescence and PUD in adulthood, with hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 0.88 (0.81-0.97) and 0.83 (0.77-0.88) for low and moderate stress resilience, respectively.

Conclusion: Lower stress resilience in adolescence is associated with reduced risk of gastrointestinal infections in adulthood, rather than the hypothesized increased risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62194 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx179 (DOI)000429036800032 ()29048469 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare, UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Montgomery, S., Bergh, C., Udumyan, R., Eriksson, M., Fall, K. & Hiyoshi, A. (2018). Sex of older siblings and stress resilience. Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 9(4), 447-455
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex of older siblings and stress resilience
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2018 (English)In: Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate whether older siblings are associated with development of stress resilience in adolescence and if there are differences by sex of siblings. The study used a Swedish register-based cohort of men (n=664 603) born between 1970 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments in adolescence that included a measure of stress resilience: associations were assessed using multinomial logistic regression. Adjusted relative risk ratios (95% confidence intervals) for low stress resilience (n=136 746) compared with high (n=142 581) are 1.33 (1.30, 1.35), 1.65 (1.59, 1.71) and 2.36 (2.18, 2.54) for one, two and three or more male older siblings, compared with none. Equivalent values for female older siblings do not have overlapping confidence intervals with males and are 1.19 (1.17, 1.21), 1.46 (1.40, 1.51) and 1.87 (1.73, 2.03). When the individual male and female siblings are compared directly (one male sibling compared with one female sibling, etc.) and after adjustment, including for cognitive function, there is a statistically significant (p<0.005) greater risk for low stress resilience associated with male siblings. Older male siblings may have greater adverse implications for psychological development, perhaps due to greater demands on familial resources or inter-sibling interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 2018
Keywords
siblings, sex, psychological functioning, stress resilience, adolescence
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69976 (URN)10.14301/llcs.v9i4.486 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Hiyoshi, A., Montgomery, S., Bottai, M. & Hoven, E. I. (2018). Trajectories of Income and Social Benefits for Mothers and Fathers of Children With Cancer: A National Cohort Study in Sweden. Cancer, 124(7), 1492-1500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trajectories of Income and Social Benefits for Mothers and Fathers of Children With Cancer: A National Cohort Study in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 1492-1500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The contribution of different income sources from work and social benefits to trajectories of income for the parents of children with cancer has not been empirically investigated.

METHODS: Using Swedish registers, parents of children with an incidence cancer diagnosis between 2004 and 2009 were identified and matched with parents of children without cancer (reference parents). A total of 20,091 families were followed from the year before the diagnosis to a maximum of 8 years. Generalized linear models estimated the ratios of mean incomes from work and social benefits and of its total.

RESULTS: Around the time of the child's cancer diagnosis, the total income was on average up to 6% higher among the mothers of children with cancer compared with reference mothers, but no differences were noted among fathers. Income from work dropped to the lowest level around the time of a cancer diagnosis, with swift recovery noted for fathers but not for mothers. Sickness and childcare-related benefits were up to 6 times larger for the parents of children with cancer than reference parents. As social benefits diminished after approximately 3 years, the total income of mothers of children with cancer became lower than that of reference mothers, and the gap widened over time.

CONCLUSIONS: Social benefits appeared to ease the financial burden during the years around a cancer diagnosis. However, mothers experienced persistently lower income after benefits diminished. Experiences differed by single-parent versus dual-parent households, the survival of the child with cancer, and other relevant characteristics. Further investigation is needed for potential long-term consequences for mothers, including their career and future pension in retirement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
cancer, child, employment, parents, social benefits, trajectory
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66384 (URN)10.1002/cncr.31123 (DOI)000428314500023 ()29430634 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041703748 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PROJ10/048 PR2014-0072Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-2128
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Mota Garcia, T., Hiyoshi, A., Udumyan, R., Sjöqvist, H., Fall, K. & Montgomery, S. (2017). Acne in late adolescence is not associated with a raised risk of subsequent malignant melanoma among men. Cancer Epidemiology, 51, 44-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acne in late adolescence is not associated with a raised risk of subsequent malignant melanoma among men
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2017 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 51, p. 44-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the association of acne in late adolescence with the risk for subsequent malignant melanoma (MM) in men.

METHODS: Swedish register-based cohort study of 242,096 males born between 1952 and 1956, who took part in compulsory assessments for Swedish military conscription in late adolescence between 1969 and 1975, with subsequent diagnoses of MM (n=1,058) up to December 31, 2009. Covariates included measures of childhood circumstances and information from adolescence on presence of acne, physical fitness, cognitive function, body mass index (BMI), and a summary of diagnoses. Cox regression was used for the analysis.

RESULTS: In total 1,058 men were diagnosed with MM. Acne was not associated with subsequent MM, with an adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence interval) of 0.95 (0.61 to 1.49). Men with parents who were agricultural workers, and men who lived in northern Sweden, had lower physical fitness, or lower cognitive function had a lower risk of MM. Overweight and obesity was associated with a raised risk, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.39 (1.14, 1.71).

CONCLUSIONS: Acne in late adolescence is unlikely to represent a raised risk for subsequent MM in men. Overweight or obesity was identified as a raised risk for MM, possibly due to the associated increased skin surface area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Malignant melanoma, Acne, Men, Adolescence, Sweden, Longitudinal, Cohort
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62195 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2017.10.001 (DOI)000415839800008 ()29032321 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034627793 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Maruyama, K., Cable, N., Hiyoshi, A., Shipley, M., Kumari, M., Iso, H., . . . Brunner, E. (2017). Association of obesity genotype and appetite-related behaviour with BMI trajectory in midlife: Whitehall II study. In: : . Paper presented at International Epidemiological Association, World Congress of Epidemiology, Omiya, Japan, 19-22 August 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of obesity genotype and appetite-related behaviour with BMI trajectory in midlife: Whitehall II study
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67240 (URN)
Conference
International Epidemiological Association, World Congress of Epidemiology, Omiya, Japan, 19-22 August 2017
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Hiyoshi, A., Fall, K., Bergh, C. & Montgomery, S. (2017). Comorbidity trajectories in working age cancer survivors: A national study of Swedish men. Cancer Epidemiology, 48, 48-55, Article ID S1877-7821(17)30039-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity trajectories in working age cancer survivors: A national study of Swedish men
2017 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 48, p. 48-55, article id S1877-7821(17)30039-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cancer survivors are of working age, and maintaining health is of interest both for their working and private life. However, patterns and determinants of comorbidity over time among adult cancer survivors are incompletely described. We aimed to identify distinct comorbidity trajectories and their potential determinants.

METHODS: In a cohort study of Swedish men born between 1952 and 1956, men diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2003 (n=878) were matched with cancer-free men (n=4340) and followed over five years after their first year of survival. Comorbid diseases were identified using hospital diagnoses and included in the analysis using group-based trajectory modelling. The association of socioeconomic and developmental characteristics were assessed using multinomial logit models.

RESULTS: Four distinct comorbidity trajectories were identified. As many as 84% of cancer survivors remained at very low levels of comorbidity, and the distribution of trajectories was similar among the cancer survivors and the cancer-free men. Increases in comorbidity were seen among those who had comorbid disease at baseline and among those with poor summary disease scores in adolescence. Socioeconomic characteristics and physical, cognitive and psychological function were associated with types of trajectory in unadjusted models but did not retain independent relationships with them after simultaneous adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS: Among working-age male cancer survivors, the majority remained free or had very low levels of comorbidity. Those with poorer health in adolescence and pre-existing comorbid diseases at cancer diagnosis may, however, benefit from follow-up to prevent further increases in comorbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Adolescence, Cancer, Comorbidity, Longitudinal, Risk factor, Survivor, Trajectory
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57346 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2017.03.001 (DOI)000405151500008 ()28365446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016519311 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-2128
Note

Funding Agencies:

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/J019119/1 

Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2088-0530

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