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Stattin, H. & Skoog, T. (2018). Pubertal timing. In: M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Arterberry, K.L. Fingerman, & J.E. Lansford (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development: . Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pubertal timing
2018 (English)In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development / [ed] M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Arterberry, K.L. Fingerman, & J.E. Lansford, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54219 (URN)9781506307657 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-02 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
Ericson, H., Skoog, T., Johansson, M. & Wåhlin-Larsson, B. (2018). Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70. Journal of Women & Aging, 30(5), 366-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70
2018 (English)In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Healthy aging, hope, negative affect, psychological outcomes, resistance training
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57052 (URN)10.1080/08952841.2017.1301720 (DOI)000443902100002 ()28375777 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017094736 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Jaf, D. & Skoog, T. (2018). Ungas kärleksrelationer. In: Emma Sorbring, Thomas Johansson (Ed.), Barn och ungdomsvetenskap: . Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ungas kärleksrelationer
2018 (Swedish)In: Barn och ungdomsvetenskap / [ed] Emma Sorbring, Thomas Johansson, Stockholm: Liber, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57839 (URN)978-91-47-11307-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Jaf, D., Skoog, T. & Özdemir, M. (2017). Does parenting behavior influence youth’s participation in organized sports activities?. In: 6th ENSEC Conference: Programme & Information. Paper presented at 6th European Networks For Social And Emotional Competence Conference (ENSEC 2017), Stockholm, Sweden, June 7-9, 2017 (pp. 69-69).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does parenting behavior influence youth’s participation in organized sports activities?
2017 (English)In: 6th ENSEC Conference: Programme & Information, 2017, p. 69-69Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Participation in organized sports activities is linked with positive developmental outcomes for youth. However, the literature consistently shows that immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports compared to their native counterparts. Thus, they are at risk for missing of the positive benefits of sports. The aim of this study was to investigate why immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports activities compared to their native counterparts. The data come from self-reports from 679 students in 7th grade. Immigrant youth were less likely (57%) to participate in organized sports activities compared to native youth (73%). Further, parents’ engagement in sports and fathers’ employment status significantly predict Nordic youths’ sports involvement (p < .05). For immigrant youth, only fathers’ employment status did (p < .05). These finding support Eccles’ expectancy-value model, which states that parents as role-models can influence youths’ participation in organized sports activities. However, this seems to only be the case for native youth.

Additional analysis will be run in order to find out other predictors that might explain the low rates of sports involvement of immigrant youth. The findings will supplement the scarce literature on immigrant youths’ low engagement in organized sports activities.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72341 (URN)
Conference
6th European Networks For Social And Emotional Competence Conference (ENSEC 2017), Stockholm, Sweden, June 7-9, 2017
Note

The title of the presentation in "6th ENSEC Conference. Programme & Information" is "The association between parental physical activity and youth sports participation. Differences and similarities between immigrant and Swedish youth".

Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Pettersson, C., Skoog, T. & Eriksson, C. (2016). Enabling relationship formation, development, and closure in a one-year female mentoring program at a non-governmental organization: a mixed-method study. BMC Public Health, 16(1), Article ID 179.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling relationship formation, development, and closure in a one-year female mentoring program at a non-governmental organization: a mixed-method study
2016 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Mental health problems among young women aged 16-24 have increased significantly in recent decades, and interventions are called for. Mentoring is a well-established preventative/promotive intervention for developing adolescents, but we have yet to fully understand how the relationship between the mentor and the protégé forms, develops, and closes. In this study, we focused on a female mentoring program implemented by a Swedish non-governmental organization, The Girls Zone. First, we examined the psychological and social characteristics of the young women who chose to take part in the program as protégés. Second, we investigated adolescent female protégés’ own experiences of the relationship process based on a relational-cultural theory perspective.

Methods: The mixed-method study included 52 questionnaires and five semi-structured interviews with young women aged 15–26 who had contacted The Girls Zone between 2010 and 2012 in order to find a mentor. Their experience of the mentoring relationships varied in duration. Data were analysed statistically and with inductive qualitative content analysis.

Results: The group of protégés was heterogeneous in that some had poor mental health and some had good mental health. On the other hand, the group was homogenous in that all its members had shown pro-active self-care by actively seeking out the program due to experiences of loneliness and a need to meet and talk with a person who could listen to them. The relationships were initially characterized by feelings of nervousness and ambivalence. However, after some time, these developed into authentic, undemanding, non-hierarchical relationships on the protégés’ terms. The closure of relationships aroused feelings of both abandonment and developing strength.

Conclusions: Mentorships that are in line with perspectives of the relational-cultural theory meet the relationship needs expressed by the female protégés. Mentor training should focus on promoting skills such as active listening and respect for the protégé based on an engaged, empathic, and authentic approach in a non-hierarchical relationship. These insights have the potential to inform interventions in several arenas where young women create authentic relationships with older persons, such as in school, in traditional health care contexts, and in youth recreation centres. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Mixed methods, Mentoring, Gender, Intervention, Emerging adulthood, Young women, Prevention, NGO, Relationship process, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48134 (URN)10.1186/s12889-016-2850-2 (DOI)000370666500001 ()26905222 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958967859 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Genusinriktad ANDT prevention - Förebyggande och främjande verksamhet för unga tjejer
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-09 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Skoog, T. & Bayram-Özdemir, S. (2016). Explaining why early-maturing girls are more exposed to sexual harassment in early adolescence. Journal of Early Adolescence, 36(4), 490-509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explaining why early-maturing girls are more exposed to sexual harassment in early adolescence
2016 (English)In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 490-509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we tested two competing explanations of the previously established link between early female puberty and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The sample included 680 seventh-grade Swedish girls (Mage = 13.40, SD = .53). Findings revealed that looking more sexually mature and being sexually active mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effect through sexually mature appearance was greater than that through engagement in sexual behaviors. Apparently, early-maturing girls are sexually harassed as a result of natural and normative sexual development, which happens earlier than for most of their peers. The findings have clear implications for prevention of sexual harassment in adolescence

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
puberty/pubertal development, sexual behavior (including pregnancy), sexual development, victimization, sexual harassment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39648 (URN)10.1177/0272431614568198 (DOI)000373917200003 ()2-s2.0-84962439434 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority 02847/2013

Available from: 2014-12-14 Created: 2014-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, V., Skoog, T. & Tillfors, M. (2016). Implementing group based parenting programs: A narrative review. Children and youth services review, 69, 67-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing group based parenting programs: A narrative review
2016 (English)In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 69, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Group based preventive parenting programs are efficacious, but seem hard to implement sustainably within regular service. This review aimed to investigate specific challenges related to their implementation. Through a systematic search in several databases, we retrieved 1356 articles for title, abstract, and full-text screening. After screening, we selected 35 articles for quality rating. An established narrative approach allowed us to include 24 studies. We used an ecological approach and a recently suggested implementation construct terminology to report our findings. To date, there are no evaluations of the implementation of group based programs where implementation aspects and effectiveness are compared with other kinds of programs or formats. Hence, important research knowledge is lacking concerning implementation of group based parenting programs. Our finding indicate that certain format specific implementation aspects of group based parenting programs are perceived by practitioners as particularly challenging. For instance, scheduling of group leader workload, provision of additional services (e.g., meals and childcare), and recruitment of participants. Further, practitioners and group leaders influence implementation success and program sustainability as well as parental attitudes and reasons for participation. To highlight the importance of practitioners and parents we suggest adaptations to the ecological model approach. Overall, the theoretical foundation of current implementation research is weak and future implementation research need to be theoretically driven. It is important to fill the existing lack of implementation knowledge because it might be one of the reasons why group based parenting programs have limited impact as preventive interventions on children's mental well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Preventive intervention; Implementation; Parenting programs; Practice
National Category
Psychology Social Work
Research subject
Psychology; Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51585 (URN)10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.07.004 (DOI)000385331000008 ()2-s2.0-84980371015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Pettersson, C., Eriksson, C. & Skoog, T. (2016). Initial motives and organizational context enabling female mentors' engagement in formal mentoring: a qualitative study from the mentors' perspective. Children and youth services review, 71, 17-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial motives and organizational context enabling female mentors' engagement in formal mentoring: a qualitative study from the mentors' perspective
2016 (English)In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 71, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mentoring aimed at supporting young people and their development shows promising results, but its delivery is threatened by the difficulty of recruiting sufficient numbers of mentors and keeping them engaged over time. The aim of this study was to help overcome this problem by examining female mentors’ motives for engaging in formal voluntary mentoring of young women, and exploring how organizations can facilitate these mentors’ satisfaction in staying engaged over time. Based on qualitative interviews with 12 mentors in a Swedish non-governmental organization, the Girls Zone, we show six categories of mentor motives related to initial motivation for engagement: self-interested reasons, empowering women, being a responsible citizen, sense of compassion, self-awareness, and longing for meaningfulness. In addition, we show five categories related to the organizational work of satisfying mentors: a win-win relationship, a feeling of ambivalence despite clear responsibilities and contributions, customized support and guidance, a caring organizational identity, and a commitment to pursue with feelings of duty and emotional connection. Using Self-Determination Theory as the framework to guide our understanding of the findings, we conclude that mentors’ motivations for engaging as mentors are linked to the fulfillment of basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Practical recommendations are offered in light of the findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Motives, organizational context, self-determination theory, female mentors, community-based mentoring
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53053 (URN)10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.10.026 (DOI)000390642400004 ()2-s2.0-84992409200 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2016-10-20 Created: 2016-10-20 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Skoog, T. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2016). Physical Appearance and Sexual Activity Mediate the Link between Early Puberty and Sexual Harassment Victimization in Male Adolescents. Sex Roles, 75(7-8), 339-348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Appearance and Sexual Activity Mediate the Link between Early Puberty and Sexual Harassment Victimization in Male Adolescents
2016 (English)In: Sex Roles, ISSN 0360-0025, E-ISSN 1573-2762, Vol. 75, no 7-8, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contrary to common belief, research shows that male adolescents are frequent targets of sexual harassment. According to some prior studies, early puberty puts male adolescents at a particular risk for being sexually harassed. In this cross-sectional study, we tested two competing explanations of the link between male pubertal timing and sexual harassment in early adolescence. The explanations were based on evolutionary and feminist theories. The sample included 704 seventh-grade Swedish male adolescents (Mage = 13.37, SD = .59). We found that looking more mature and being sexually active significantly mediated the link between pubertal timing and sexual harassment. The magnitude of the indirect effects did not differ significantly from each other. These findings largely replicate prior research for female adolescents, and they suggest that early pubertal timing is linked to victimizing sexual phenomena in early adolescence through young men’s normative sexually mature appearance and sexual activities. Tolerance and respect for differences should be central components of interventions aimed at reducing sexual harassment among young people of any gender.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Sexual harassment; Puberty; Sexuality; Victimization; Human males
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49429 (URN)10.1007/s11199-016-0619-9 (DOI)000383703700005 ()2-s2.0-84962696817 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Skoog, T. (2016). Pubertal timing and its developmental significance for mental health and adjustment (2ed.). In: Howard S. Friedman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Mental Health: (pp. 386-397). Oxford, UK: Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pubertal timing and its developmental significance for mental health and adjustment
2016 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Mental Health / [ed] Howard S. Friedman, Oxford, UK: Academic Press, 2016, 2, p. 386-397Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although puberty is a universal developmental process and the developmental sequence of pubertal changes tends to be similar for boys and girls, there are considerable individual differences in the timing of puberty. In this article, we reviewed well-cited empirical studies concerning pubertal timing and its developmental significance for mental health and social adjustment outcomes in adolescence. We present the major theoretical models about pubertal development and attend to the questions of why, when, and under what circumstances puberty is consequential. We draw conclusions and discuss implications for interventions and future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, UK: Academic Press, 2016 Edition: 2
Keywords
Adolescence; Adrenarche; Contextual amplification; Externalizing problems; Gonadarche; Internalizing problems; Menarche; Mental health problems; Peer socialization; Pubertal timing; Puberty; Self-concept; Social adjustment; Sexual maturation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42967 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-397045-9.00073-2 (DOI)9780123970459 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7456-2397

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