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Kjellin, Lars
Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Pelto-Piri, V. & Kjellin, L. (2019). Social inclusion and prevention of violence: Patients’, staff members’ and ward managers’ descriptions of meetings in psychiatric inpatient care in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress on Violence in Clinical Psychiatry 2019, Oslo, Norway, 24-26 October, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social inclusion and prevention of violence: Patients’, staff members’ and ward managers’ descriptions of meetings in psychiatric inpatient care in Sweden
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The professionals’ beliefs about the meeting with the patient have a crucial impact on the framing of the situation and thereby on patient’s possibilities to participate in the process. It is possible to identify three ethical perspectives through history in the normative medical and psychiatric ethics literature: paternalism, autonomy and social inclusion, which reflect a historical development of complementary values in psychiatry. The latest of these perspectives, social inclusion can be defined as a process to improve the terms of participation in society; to enhance the opportunities for people who are disadvantaged to get access to resources, get their voice heard and rights respected. The meetings with caregivers should be characterized by participation of the patient. The research of prevention of violence have been quite instrumental, it has focused on “what works”. Interestingly, this empirical perspective has essentially given recommendations that have been in line with the values in social inclusion and the recovery approach. The aim of this presentation is to investigate the possibilities and obstacles for patients to be socially included in his/her own care and in the psychiatric inpatient environment. The empirical material comes from the project “Prevention of violence in psychiatric inpatient care, aspects of ethics and safety in encounters with patients”. Included participants in this study is 13 patients, 17 staff members in three focus groups, and six ward managers on three clinics, a general psychiatric, a psychiatric addiction and a forensic psychiatric clinic. We will analyse all interviews with stakeholders with the framework method in order to describe inclusion and exclusion processes in psychiatric inpatient care. Through a literature review and pre-study of the material four main areas were identified: •Interpersonal meetings: to have respectful meetings and “see the patient” was important according to all stakeholders. •Patient involvement in care: Staff stress the importance of patient involvement and being honest to the patient, they seem to describe a more inclusive care than patients. •Organizational conditions for care: Delayed care, the competence of the present staff and other organizational issues could affect the relation between patients and staff. •Coercive measures. All stakeholders tried to minimize these in various ways, even though there were suspicions that some staff members wanted to provoke patients into conflicts. At the conference we will present the complete result from the analysis and discuss how stakeholders look at the possibility of social inclusion in the limited environment of a psychiatric ward. Educational goals 1.Learn about the possibilities of social inclusion of patients in the limited environment of a psychiatric ward. 2.To gain understanding of the role of social inclusion in primary prevention of violence. 3.To get some ideas and facts to the discussion on values in primary prevention of violence.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77684 (URN)
Conference
European Congress on Violence in Clinical Psychiatry 2019, Oslo, Norway, 24-26 October, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Lindstedt, K., Kjellin, L. & Gustafsson, S. A. (2017). Adolescents with full or subthreshold anorexia nervosa in a naturalistic sample: characteristics and treatment outcome. Journal of Eating Disorders, 5(1), Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents with full or subthreshold anorexia nervosa in a naturalistic sample: characteristics and treatment outcome
2017 (English)In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Anorexia Nervosa (AN) destroys developmentally important early years of many young people and knowledge is insufficient regarding course, treatment outcome and prognosis. Only a few naturalistic studies have been conducted within the field of eating disorder (ED) research. In this naturalistic study we included adolescents with AN or subthreshold AN treated in outpatient care, and the overall aim was to examine sample characteristics and treatment outcome. Additional aims were to examine potential factors associated with remission as an outcome variable, and possible differences between three time periods for treatment onset.

Methods: Participants were identified through the Swedish national quality register for eating disorder treatment (SwEat), in which patients are registered at treatment onset and followed up once a year until end of treatment (EOT). Inclusion criteria were: medical or self-referral to one of the participating treatment units between 1999 and 2014, 13-19 years of age at initial entry into SwEat and diagnosed with AN or subthreshold AN. The total sample consisted of 3997 patient from 83 different treatment units.

Results: The results show that 55% of the participants were in remission and approximately 85% were within a healthy weight range at EOT. Of those who ended treatment according to plan, 70% were in remission and 90% within a healthy weight range. The average treatment duration was approximately 15 months. About one third of the patients terminated treatment prematurely, which was associated with a decreased chance of achieving remission. Remission rates and weight recovery increased over time, while treatment duration decreased. Considering treatment outcome, the results did not show any differences between patients with AN or subthreshold AN.

Conclusions: The present study shows a relatively good prognosis for adolescent patients with AN or subthreshold AN in routine care and the results indicate that treatment for adolescents with ED in Sweden has become more effective over the past 15 years. The results of the present study contribute to the scope of treatment research and the large-scale naturalistic setting secures the generalizability to a clinical environment. However, more research is needed into different forms of evidence, new research strategies and diversity of treatment approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Adolescents, Anorexia nervosa, Eating disorders, Naturalistic sample, Treatment
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57066 (URN)10.1186/s40337-017-0135-5 (DOI)000395733900001 ()28265410 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014399551 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Region Örebro County

Örebro University

Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Elwin, M., Schröder, A., Ek, L., Wallsten, T. & Kjellin, L. (2017). Sensory Clusters of Adults With and Without Autism Spectrum Conditions. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 47(3), 579-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory Clusters of Adults With and Without Autism Spectrum Conditions
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2017 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 579-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We identified clusters of atypical sensory functioning adults with ASC by hierarchical cluster analysis. A new scale for commonly self-reported sensory reactivity was used as a measure. In a low frequency group (n = 37), all subscale scores were relatively low, in particular atypical sensory/motor reactivity. In the intermediate group (n = 17) hyperreactivity, sensory interests and sensory/motor issues were significantly elevated in relation to the first group, but not hyporeactivity. In a high frequency subgroup (n = 17) all subscale scores were significantly elevated and co-occurrence of hyper- and hyporeactivity was evident. In a population sample, a cluster of low scorers (n = 136) and high scorers relative to the other cluster (n = 26) was found. Identification of atypical sensory reactivity is important for targeting support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Autism spectrum, adults, sensory reactivity, cluster analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53879 (URN)10.1007/s10803-016-2976-1 (DOI)000396815400006 ()27921201 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85002444271 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Uppsala-Örebro Regional Research Council

Research Committee, Örebro Region County

Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2018-07-28Bibliographically approved
Choque Olsson, N., Flygare, O., Coco, C., Görling, A., Råde, A., Chen, Q., . . . Bölte, S. (2017). Social Skills Training for Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 56(7), 585-592, Article ID S0890-8567(17)30202-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Skills Training for Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2017 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 585-592, article id S0890-8567(17)30202-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Social skills group training (SSGT) for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is widely applied, but effectiveness in real-world practice has not yet been properly evaluated. This study sought to bridge this gap.

METHOD: This 12-week pragmatic randomized controlled trial of SSGT compared to standard care alone was conducted at 13 child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient units in Sweden. Twelve sessions of manualized SSGT ("KONTAKT") were delivered by regular clinical staff. Participants (N = 296; 88 females and 208 males) were children (n = 172) and adolescents (n = 124) aged 8 to 17 years with ASD without intellectual disability. The primary outcome was the Social Responsiveness Scale rating by parents and blinded teachers. Secondary outcomes included parent- and teacher-rated adaptive behaviors, trainer-rated global functioning and clinical severity, and self-reported child and caregiver stress. Assessments were made at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. Moderator analyses were conducted for age and gender.

RESULTS: Significant treatment effects on the primary outcome were limited to parent ratings for the adolescent subgroup (posttreatment: -8.3; 95% CI = -14.2 to -1.9; p = .012, effect size [ES] = 0.32; follow-up: -8.6; 95% CI = -15.4 to -1.8; p = .015, ES = 0.33) and females (posttreatment: -8.9; 95% CI = -16.2 to -1.6; p = .019, ES = 0.40). Secondary outcomes indicated moderate effects on adaptive functioning and clinical severity.

CONCLUSION: SSGT for children and adolescents with ASD in regular mental health services is feasible and safe. However, the modest and inconsistent effects underscore the importance of continued efforts to improve SSGT beyond current standards.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: Social Skills Group Training ("KONTAKT") for Children and Adolescent With High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders; https://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT01854346.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
adolescence, autism spectrum disorder, gender, intervention, treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60812 (URN)10.1016/j.jaac.2017.05.001 (DOI)000405051300007 ()28647010 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021349644 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencieas;

Foundation Sunnerdahls Disability

Majblomman

Stockholm County Council

Pediatric Research Foundation at Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital

Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare

Jane and Dan Olsson foundation

Swedish Research Council

Swedish Social Insurance Agency

Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research

Jeansson Foundations

Åke Wiberg Foundation

Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education

Swedish Brain Foundation

Swedish National Board of Institutional Care

Autism and Asperger Society Stockholm

Hjarnfonden

Vinnova

FORMAS

Research Foundation at Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital

Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions

Trygg Hansa

Forsakringskassan

Stiftelsen Markus och Amalia Wallenbergs Min-nesfond

Stiftelsen Sunnerdahls Handikappfond

European Union (H2020)

Niclas Oberg Foundation Life Watch

Tore Nilsson Stiftelse

Stiftelse Kempe-Carlgrenska Fonden

Shire

Roche

Eli Lilly and Co.

GLGroup

System Analytic

Kompetento

Expo Medico

ProPhase

Kohlhammer

Pysslingen group

Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Ahlberg, R., Skårberg, K., Brus, O. & Kjellin, L. (2016). Auricular acupuncture for substance use: a randomized controlled trial of effects on anxiety, sleep, drug use and use of addiction treatment services. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, 11(1), Article ID 24.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture for substance use: a randomized controlled trial of effects on anxiety, sleep, drug use and use of addiction treatment services
2016 (English)In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A common alternative treatment for substance abuse is auricular acupuncture. The aim of the study was to evaluate the short and long-term effect of auricular acupuncture on anxiety, sleep, drug use and addiction treatment utilization in adults with substance abuse.

Method: Of the patients included, 280 adults with substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidity, 80 were randomly assigned to auricular acupuncture according to the NADA protocol, 80 to auricular acupuncture according to a local protocol (LP), and 120 to relaxation (controls). The primary outcomes anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI) and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) were measured at baseline and at follow-ups 5 weeks and 3 months after the baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes were drug use and addiction service utilization. Complete datasets regarding BAI/ISI were obtained from 37/34 subjects in the NADA group, 28/28 in the LP group and 36/35 controls. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Analysis of Variance, Kruskal Wallis, Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Eta square (η(2)), and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests.

Results: Participants in NADA, LP and control group improved significantly on the ISI and BAI. There was no significant difference in change over time between the three groups in any of the primary (effect size: BAI, η(2) = 0.03, ISI, η(2) = 0.05) or secondary outcomes. Neither of the two acupuncture treatments resulted in differences in sleep, anxiety or drug use from the control group at 5 weeks or 3 months.

Conclusion: No evidence was found that acupuncture as delivered in this study is more effective than relaxation for problems with anxiety, sleep or substance use or in reducing the need for further addiction treatment in patients with substance use problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders. The substantial attrition at follow-up is a main limitation of the study.

Trial registration: Clinical Trials NCT02604706 (retrospectively registered).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Auricular acupuncture; Psychiatric comorbidity; Randomized controlled trial; Relaxation; Substance abuse treatment
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51524 (URN)10.1186/s13011-016-0068-z (DOI)000381187000001 ()27451854 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978898074 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Region Örebro County, Sweden

Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-02 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Elwin, M., Schröder, A., Ek, L. & Kjellin, L. (2016). Development and pilot validation of a sensory reactivity scale for adults with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: Sensory Reactivity in Autism Spectrum (SR-AS). Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 70(2), 103-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and pilot validation of a sensory reactivity scale for adults with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: Sensory Reactivity in Autism Spectrum (SR-AS)
2016 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Unusual reactions to sensory stimuli are experienced by 90-95% of people with an autism spectrum condition (ASC). Self-reported sensory reactivity in ASC has mainly been measured with generic questionnaires developed and validated on data from the general population. Interest in sensory reactivity in ASC increased after the inclusion of hyper- and hypo-reactivity together with unusual sensory interest as diagnostic markers of ASC in the DSM-5.

Aims: To develop and pilot validate a self-report questionnaire designed from first-hand descriptions of the target group of adults diagnosed with high functioning ASC. Psychometric properties of the questionnaire were evaluated on a sample of participants with ASC diagnoses (N = 71) and a random sample from the general population (N = 162).

Results: The Sensory Reactivity in Autism Spectrum (SR-AS is intended to be used as a screening tool in diagnostic processes with adults and for support in adapting compensating strategies and environmental adjustments. The internal consistency was high for both the SR-AS and its subscales. The total scale Cronbach's alpha was 0.96 and the subscales alphas were 0.80. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed best fit for a four-factor model of inter-correlated factors: hyper and hypo-reactivity, strong sensory interest and a sensory/motor factor. The questionnaire discriminated well between ASC-diagnosed participants and participants from the general population.

Conclusions: The SR-AS displayed good internal consistency and discriminatory power and promising factorial validity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Autism spectrum, Psychometric validation, Scale development, Sensory reactivity
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47286 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2015.1053984 (DOI)000366184300004 ()26158770 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949437448 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Committee of Örebro County Council

Uppsala-Örebro Regional Research Council

Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Pelto-Piri, V., Kjellin, L., Lindvall, C. & Engström, I. (2016). Justifications for coercive care in child and adolescent psychiatry, a content analysis of medical documentation in Sweden. BMC Health Services Research, 16, Article ID 66.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Justifications for coercive care in child and adolescent psychiatry, a content analysis of medical documentation in Sweden
2016 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 16, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There has been considerable interest in normative ethics regarding how and when coercive care can be justified. However, only a few empirical studies consider how professionals reason about ethical aspects when assessing the need for coercive care for adults, and even less concerning children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine and describe how professionals document their value arguments when considering the need for coercive psychiatric care of young people.

Methods: All 16 clinics that admitted children or adolescents to coercive care during one year in Sweden were included in the study. These clinics had a total of 155 admissions of 142 patients over one year. Qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach was used to find different forms of justification for coercive care that was documented in the medical records, including Care Certificates.

Results: The analysis of medical records revealed two main arguments used to justify coercive care in child and adolescent psychiatry: 1) the protection argument - the patients needed protection, mainly from themselves, and 2) the treatment requirement argument - coercive care was a necessary measure for administering treatment to the patient. Other arguments, namely the caregiver support argument, the clarification argument and the solidarity argument, were used primarily to support the two main arguments. These supportive arguments were mostly used when describing the current situation, not in the explicit argumentation for coercive care. The need for treatment was often only implicitly clarified and the type of care the patient needed was not specified. Few value arguments were used in the decision for coercive care; instead physicians often used their authority to convince others that treatment was necessary.

Conclusions: One clinical implication of the study is that decisions about the use of coercive care should have a much stronger emphasis on ethical aspects. There is a need for an ethical legitimacy founded upon explicit ethical reasoning and after communication with the patient and family, which should be documented together with the decision to use coercive care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Psychiatry, Coercive care, Medical records, Decision making, Values, Ethics, Children, Adolescents, Content analysis, Sweden
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49362 (URN)10.1186/s12913-016-1310-0 (DOI)000370406400001 ()26893126 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84959529829 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Region Örebro County, Sweden

Swedish research programme "Ethics in Health Care"

Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Selvin, M., Almqvist, K., Kjellin, L. & Schröder, A. (2016). The Concept of Patient Participation in Forensic Psychiatric Care: The Patient Perspective. Journal of Forensic Nursing, 12(2), 57-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Concept of Patient Participation in Forensic Psychiatric Care: The Patient Perspective
2016 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Nursing, ISSN 1939-3938, E-ISSN 1556-3693, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of patient participation is advocated in medical treatment and nursing care and has been linked to increased quality of care, increased patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Still, patients in forensic psychiatric care often report being unhappy with their experienced level of participation. The concept of patient participation is complex and has several definitions, thus it is important to investigate it from different perspectives in different contexts. The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care. A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used, and interviews with 19 participants in a Swedish setting were completed. The participants described the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care as follows: influence, to have good communication and to be involved; confidence, to trust the treatment and to have mutual trust; and own responsibility, to participate in activities and to take the initiative. On the basis of the results of this study, improved patient participation in forensic psychiatric care may be achieved with active communication, by building up and maintaining trust for the professional competence and by encouraging patients' own responsibility. It is important that knowledge about patients' views of the concept of patient participation is included in the planning and improvement of forensic care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keywords
Coercive care, forensic psychiatric care, patient participation, patient perspective
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49870 (URN)10.1097/JFN.0000000000000107 (DOI)000385299400003 ()27088759 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84973354122 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lindstedt, K., Neander, K., Kjellin, L. & Gustafsson, S. A. (2015). Being me and being us: adolescents' experiences of treatment for eating disorders. Journal of eating disorders, 3(9)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being me and being us: adolescents' experiences of treatment for eating disorders
2015 (English)In: Journal of eating disorders, ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 3, no 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This qualitative study addresses adolescents' perception of treatment for eating disorders. The importance of involving parents in treatment of young people with eating disorders, especially young people with Anorexia Nervosa, is emphasized in a number of studies. Even so, this form of treatment does not work for everybody, not even within a limited diagnostic group. Previous research has revealed that many young people are not entirely satisfied with their treatment. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the perspectives of adolescents in outpatient treatment, whose treatment often involves family. The aim of the present study was to investigate how young people with experience from adolescent outpatient treatment for eating disorders, involving family-based and individual based interventions, perceive their time in treatment.

METHODS: This study was conducted using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Fifteen participants were recruited in collaboration with four specialized eating disorder units and interviewed with the purpose to gather narratives.

RESULTS: The analysis revealed that the adolescents sometimes felt more or less forced into treatment, and strong ambivalent feelings about if and how to participate in treatment permeated the adolescents' narratives. The common factors which emerged in the narratives were assembled under the two major themes: Having to involve family in treatment - in one way or another and Making progress in treatment - a matter of trust.

CONCLUSIONS: It is of great importance to involve family in treatment in order to understand the problems of the adolescents in their context and be able to take advantage of the resource that parents constitute. However, in certain situations, it is necessary to prioritise individual treatment interventions so that instead of sorting out difficult family situations the therapist focuses on enhancing the young people's resilience, thus enabling them to tackle problematic situations in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Eating disorders, adolescents, treatment, qualitative research
National Category
Psychiatry Other Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44821 (URN)10.1186/s40337-015-0051-5 (DOI)000214989700042 ()25834734 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84941146283 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

SwEat-Swedish Eating Disorder Register

Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-03 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Callenmark, B., Kjellin, L., Rönnqvist, L. & Bolte, S. (2014). Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. Autism, 18(6), 684-693
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder
2014 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 684-693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 carefully matched typically developing controls completed the Dewey Story Test. 'Explicit' (multiple-choice answering format) and 'implicit' (free interview) measures of social cognition were obtained. Autism spectrum disorder participants did not differ from controls regarding explicit social cognition performance. However, the autism spectrum disorder group performed more poorly than controls on implicit social cognition performance in terms of spontaneous perspective taking and social awareness. Findings suggest that social cognition alterations in autism spectrum disorder are primarily implicit in nature and that an apparent absence of social cognition difficulties on certain tests using rather explicit testing formats does not necessarily mean social cognition typicality in autism spectrum disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Asperger’s syndrome, assessment, mentalizing, neurodevelopmental disorders, psychometrics, theory of mind
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38246 (URN)10.1177/1362361313492393 (DOI)000342637900007 ()24104519 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904629940 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-03 Created: 2014-10-30 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved
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