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Schrooten, Martien G. S.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9462-0256
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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Gatzounis, R., Schrooten, M. G. S., Crombez, G. & Vlaeyen, J. W. S. (2018). Activity interruptions by pain impair activity resumption, but not more than activity interruptions by other stimuli: an experimental investigation. Pain, 159(2), 351-358
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity interruptions by pain impair activity resumption, but not more than activity interruptions by other stimuli: an experimental investigation
2018 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 159, no 2, p. 351-358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interrupting ongoing activities whilst intending to resume them later is a natural response to pain. Whereas this response facilitates pain management, at the same time it may also disrupt task performance. Previous research has shown that activity interruptions by pain impair subsequent resumption of the activity, but not more than pain-irrelevant interruptions. Ongoing task complexity and pain threat value might influence interruption effects. In this experiment, we adjusted a paradigm from outside the field of pain to investigate how activity interruptions by pain affect task performance. Healthy participants (n=69) were required to answer a series of questions, in a specific sequence, about presented letter-digit combinations. This ongoing task was occasionally interrupted by painful electrocutaneous or non-painful vibrotactile stimulation (between-subjects) followed by a typing task. Upon interruption completion, participants were required to resume the ongoing task at the next step of the question sequence. Results indicate impaired sequence accuracy (less frequent resumption at the correct step of the sequence) but preserved non-sequence accuracy (similarly frequent correct responses to question content) immediately after an interruption. Effects were not larger for interruptions by pain, compared to non-pain. Further, participants in the two conditions reported similar task experience, namely task motivation, perceived difficulty, and confidence to resume the interrupted task. Pain catastrophizing did not influence the results. As in previous studies, activity interruptions by pain were shown to impair the resumption of a task that requires keeping to a step sequence, but not more than interruptions by non-painful stimuli. Potential explanations are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
Pain; (Activity) interruption; Task performance; Task switch; Vibrotactile stimulus
National Category
Applied Psychology Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62447 (URN)10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001079 (DOI)000428999000018 ()28968344 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043714046 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

PhD "Aspirant" grant - Research Foundation-Flanders, Belgium (FWO Vlaanderen)  11N8215N 

"Asthenes" long-term structural funding-Methusalem grant - Flemish Government, Belgium  METH/15/011 

Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Karsdorp, P. A., Schrooten, M. G. S. & Geenen, R. (2018). Attentional control and the competition between nonpain goals and the threat of pain. European Journal of Pain, 22(1), 181-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attentional control and the competition between nonpain goals and the threat of pain
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Fully understanding attention to pain requires taking into account the motivational context. Both pain- and (nonpain) goal-related information attracts attention. An intriguing question is which attentional bias prevails when pain- and goal-related information co-occurs? Reduced attentional bias towards pain- and goal-related information was predicted when the other competing information was presented simultaneously. Moreover, trait attentional control was predicted to be associated with stronger attentional bias towards goal-related information particularly in the presence of pain-related information.

METHODS: Attentional competition between pain- and (nonpain) goal-related information was measured in ninety participants using a dot-probe task presenting two stimuli (pain-related, goal-related or neutral) simultaneously. Reaction time was the dependent variable. Dot-probe trials alternated with goal trials to induce a temporary goal. Trait attentional control was measured with the attentional control scale.

RESULTS: For pain-related neutral stimulus pairs, participants responded fastest when probes appeared on the same, compared to the opposite, location as the pain-related stimulus. For pain-goal-related stimulus pairs, responses were fastest when probes appeared on the same, compared to the opposite, location as the goal-related stimulus. Higher trait attentional control was associated with faster responding when probes appeared on the same, compared to the opposite, location as the goal-related stimulus. Unpredicted, this effect was irrespective of the co-occurring stimulus (neutral vs. pain-related).

CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the unintentional allocation of attention towards events related to a temporary (nonpain) goal prevails over attentional bias to events predicting pain. Trait attentional control predicts stronger attentional allocation towards events related to a temporary goal.

SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that treatment interventions facilitating goal pursuit in patients with chronic pain are beneficial in reducing attentional biases towards pain-related events.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62458 (URN)10.1002/ejp.1114 (DOI)000418080700018 ()28949062 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038423369 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research  453-04-003 

Örebro University, Sweden 

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Edebol-Carlman, H., Schrooten, M. G. S., Ljóttson, B., Boersma, K., Linton, S. J. & Brummer, R. J. (2018). Cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: the effects on state and trait anxiety and the autonomic nervous system during induced rectal distensions - An uncontrolled trial. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 18, 81-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: the effects on state and trait anxiety and the autonomic nervous system during induced rectal distensions - An uncontrolled trial
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 18, p. 81-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is a common multifactorial gastrointestinal disorder linked to disturbances in the microbe gut-brain axis. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), in face-to-face format has showed promising results on IBS and its associated psychological symptoms. The present study explored for the first time if CBT for IBS affects the autonomic nervous system (ANS) during experimentally induced visceral pain and cognitive stress, respectively. The levels of state and trait anxiety, current and perceived stress were also evaluated.

Methods: In this uncontrolled trial, individual CBT was performed in face-to-face format for 12 weeks in 18 subjects with IBS. Heart rate variability and skin conductance were measured during experimentally induced visceral pain and during a cognitive task (Stroop color-word test), before and after intervention. The levels of state and trait anxiety as well as self-rated current and perceived stress were also measured before and after the intervention.

Results: CBT did not affect ANS activity during experimentally induced visceral pain and cognitive stress. The sympathetic activity was high, typical for IBS and triggered during both visceral pain and cognitive stress. The levels of state and trait anxiety significantly decreased after the intervention. No significant changes in self-rated current or perceived stress were found.

Conclusions: Results suggest that face-to-face CBT for IBS improved anxiety- a key psychological mechanism for the IBS pathophysiology, rather than the autonomic stress response to experimentally induced visceral pain and cognitive stress, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2018
Keywords
irritable bowel syndrome; cognitive behavioral therapy; state anxiety; trait anxiety; stress; autonomic nervous system; visceral hypersensitivity
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64294 (URN)10.1515/sjpain-2017-0153 (DOI)000426817200009 ()2-s2.0-85043578532 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Gatzounis, R., Schrooten, M. G. S., Crombez, G. & Vlaeyen, J. (2018). Effects of activity interruptions by pain on pattern of activity performance: An experimental investigation. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 18, 109-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of activity interruptions by pain on pattern of activity performance: An experimental investigation
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 18, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Suspending an ongoing activity with the intention to resume it again later is a natural response to pain. This response facilitates coping with the pain, but it may also have negative consequences for the resumption and performance of the activity. For example, people with pain problems are often forced to take a break from doing their household chores because of their pain. They might delay resuming their chore, eventually needing longer time to finish it. We investigated how activity interruptions by pain influence the pattern of subsequent activity performance. We expected that when an activity is interrupted by pain (compared to non-pain), people spend longer time away from the activity, need longer time to complete it, and are less motivated to perform it.

Methods: Sixty healthy volunteers performed an ongoing task that required them to make joystick movements in different directions according to a specific rule. Occasionally, participants received either a painful electrocutaneous stimulus or a non-painful and non-aversive auditory stimulus (between-subjects) as an interruption cue. The interruption cue was followed by the temporary suspension of the ongoing task and the initiation of a different activity (interruption task). The latter required the categorization of cards and had a maximum duration, but participants could also stop it earlier by pressing a button. We measured time away from the (interrupted) ongoing task, total time to complete the ongoing task (including the interruptions) and self-reported motivation to perform both the ongoing as well as the interruption task.

Results: Groups did not differ in the time away from the ongoing task, total time to complete the ongoing task, or self-reported motivation to perform the two tasks.

Conclusions: Activity interruptions by pain did not impair the pattern of activity performance more than activity interruptions by non-pain. Potential explanations and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2018
Keywords
pain; (activity) interruption; task performance; performance pattern; task interference
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64295 (URN)10.1515/sjpain-2017-0098 (DOI)000426817200012 ()2-s2.0-85042026662 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Foundation - Flanders, Belgium (FWO Vlaanderen)  11N8215N 

Odysseus Grant "The Psychology of Pain and Disability Research Program" - Research Foundation Flanders (FWO Vlaanderen), Belgium  G090208N 

Flemish Government, Belgium  METH/15/011 

Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Gatzounis, R., Schrooten, M. G. S., Crombez, G. & Vlaeyen, J. W. (2018). Forgetting to remember?: Prospective memory within the context of pain. European Journal of Pain, 22(3), 614-625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forgetting to remember?: Prospective memory within the context of pain
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 614-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Pain interferes with cognitive functioning in several ways. Among other symptoms, pain patients often report difficulties with remembering future intentions. It remains unclear, however, whether it is the pain per se that impairs prospective remembering or other factors that often characterize people with pain (e.g. poor sleep quality). In this experiment, we investigated whether prospective memory is impaired within the context of pain, and whether this impairment is enhanced when the threat value of pain is increased.

METHODS: Healthy participants engaged in an ongoing word categorization task, during which they received either experimental pain stimuli (with or without threatening instructions designed to increase the threat value of pain), or no pain stimuli (no somatic stimuli and no threatening instructions). Crucially, participants were also instructed to perform a prospective memory intention on future moments that would be signalled by specific retrieval cues.

RESULTS: Threatening instructions did not differentiate the pain groups in terms of pain threat value; therefore, we only focus on the difference between pain and no pain. Pain and no-pain groups performed the prospective memory intention with similar frequency, indicating that prospective memory is not necessarily impaired when the intended action has to be performed in a painful context.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings are discussed in the framework of the multiprocess theory of prospective memory, which differentiates between the spontaneous and the strategic retrieval of intentions. Methodological considerations and suggestions for future research are discussed.

SIGNIFICANCE: This laboratory study combines established methods from two research fields to investigate the effects of a painful context on memory for future intentions. Painful context did not impair performance of a prospective memory intention that is assumed to be retrieved by means of spontaneous processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63409 (URN)10.1002/ejp.1152 (DOI)000425632800016 ()29226495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042254441 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Research Foundation - Flanders, Belgium (FWO Vlaanderen)  11N8215N 

Flemish Government, Belgium  METH/15/011 

Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Schrooten, M. G. S. & Linton, S. J. (2017). Changing pain expectations: the role of social context and communication. Pain, 158(7), 1185-1186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing pain expectations: the role of social context and communication
2017 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 158, no 7, p. 1185-1186Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59314 (URN)10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000922 (DOI)000404972200002 ()28426551 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021443793 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-25 Created: 2017-08-25 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Carstens, J. K. P., Boersma, K., Schrooten, M. G. S. & Linton, S. J. (2017). Effects of validating communication on recall during a pain-task in healthy participants. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 17, 118-125, Article ID S1877-8860(17)30143-X.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of validating communication on recall during a pain-task in healthy participants
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, p. 118-125, article id S1877-8860(17)30143-XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Increasing recall of instructions and advice in a pain consultation is important, since it is a prerequisite for adherence to treatment recommendations. However, interference due to pain-related distress may result in poor recall. Whereas there are some indications that recall can be increased by empathic communication that reduces interference, this interesting possibility remains largely untested experimentally. The current experiment aimed at studying effects of empathic communication, and more specifically validation, on recall during a pain test and possible mediators and moderators of this effect.

METHOD: Participants received either validating (N=25) or invalidating responses (N=25) from the experimenter during a pain provoking task, followed by self-report measures of interference (affect, situational pain catastrophizing) and recall (accurate and false memories of words).

RESULTS: As expected, the validated group exhibited higher accurate recall and less false memories following the pain test as compared to the invalidated group. This was partly due to the effect of interference being counteracted by moderating the relationship between pain catastrophizing and recall.

CONCLUSION: These novel results suggest that validating communication can counteract interference due to pain catastrophizing on recall, at least in a controlled experimental setting.

IMPLICATIONS: Good communication by health professionals is of utmost importance for adherence to pain management. The current results expand our knowledge on the effects of pain communication by establishing and explaining a clear link between empathic communication and recall, highlighting the role of pain catastrophizing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2017
Keywords
Validation; Communication; Memory recall; Pain catastrophizing; Affect
National Category
Applied Psychology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61698 (URN)10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.07.003 (DOI)000419851500017 ()28850364 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028312094 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Gatzounis, R., Schrooten, M. G. S., Crombez, G., Vancleef, L. M. G. & Vlaeyen, J. W. (2017). Taking a break in response to pain: An experimental investigation of the effects of interruptions by pain on subsequent activity resumption. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 16, 52-60, Article ID S1877-8860(17)30029-0.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking a break in response to pain: An experimental investigation of the effects of interruptions by pain on subsequent activity resumption
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 16, p. 52-60, article id S1877-8860(17)30029-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Interrupting ongoing activities with the intention to resume them again later is a natural response to pain. However, such interruptions might have negative consequences for the subsequent resumption and performance of the interrupted activity. Activity interruptions by pain may be more impairing than interruptions by non-painful stimuli, and also be subjectively experienced as such. These effects might be more pronounced in people high in pain catastrophizing. These hypotheses were investigated in two experiments.

METHODS: In Experiment 1, healthy volunteers (n=24) performed an ongoing task requiring a sequence of joystick movements. Occasionally, they received either a painful electrocutaneous or a non-painful vibrotactile stimulus, followed by suspension of the ongoing task and temporary engagement in a different task (interruption task). After performing the interruption task for 30s, participants resumed the ongoing task. As the ongoing task of Experiment 1 was rather simple, Experiment 2 (n=30) included a modified, somewhat more complex version of the task, in order to examine the effects of activity interruptions by pain.

RESULTS: Participants made more errors and were slower to initiate movements (Experiment 1 & 2) and to complete movements (Experiment 2) when they resumed the ongoing task after an interruption, indicating that interruptions impaired subsequent performance. However, these impairments were not larger when the interruption was prompted by painful than by non-painful stimulation. Pain catastrophizing did not influence the results.

CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that activity interruptions by pain have negative consequences for the performance of an activity upon its resumption, but not more so than interruptions by non-painful stimuli. Potential explanations and avenues for future research are discussed.

IMPLICATIONS: Interrupting ongoing activities is a common response to pain. In two experiments using a novel paradigm we showed that activity interruptions by pain impair subsequent activity resumption and performance. However, this effect seems to not be specific to pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Activity interruption; Task interruption (chronic) Pain; Task performance; Task resumption; Task switch
National Category
Applied Psychology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61695 (URN)10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.02.008 (DOI)000419850300008 ()28850412 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015978501 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Foundation - Flanders, Belgium (FWO Vlaanderen)  PSG-C5007-Asp/12

Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Boersma, K., Ljótsson, B., Edebol-Carlman, H., Schrooten, M., Linton, S. J. & Brummer, R. J. (2016). Exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: A single-case experimental design across 13 subjects. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 45(6), 415-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: A single-case experimental design across 13 subjects
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2016 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 415-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent disorder with a significant impact on quality of life. The presence of psychological symptoms in IBS patients such as catastrophic worry and behavioral avoidance suggests the possible efficacy of cognitive behavioral interventions. Exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has proven to be a promising approach but has only been investigated in a few studies and mainly via the Internet. Therefore, the aims of this study were to extend and replicate previous findings and to evaluate whether an individual, face-to-face, exposure-based CBT leads to improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms, pain catastrophizing, avoidance behavior and quality of life in IBS patients. Thirteen patients with IBS according to Rome III criteria participated in a single-case experimental study using a five-week baseline and a subsequent twelve-session intervention phase focusing on psycho-education, mindfulness and in vivo exposure. Standardized measurement of gastrointestinal symptoms, pain catastrophizing, avoidance behavior and quality of life was conducted weekly during baseline as well as intervention phase and at six-month follow-up. Results showed that over 70% of patients improved significantly on gastrointestinal symptoms, pain catastrophizing, and quality of life. Effects on avoidance behavior were modest. These results strengthen and extend earlier findings and provide further support for the efficacy of exposure-based strategies for IBS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Irritable bowel syndrome, exposure treatment, singlecase experimental design, behavioral medicine
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50864 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2016.1194455 (DOI)000389240600001 ()27285475 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84982085450 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Linton, S. J., Flink, I. K., Schrooten, M. G. S. & Wiksell, R. (2016). Understanding Co-occurring Emotion and Pain: The Role of Context Sensitivity from a Transdiagnostic Perspective. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 46(3), 129-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding Co-occurring Emotion and Pain: The Role of Context Sensitivity from a Transdiagnostic Perspective
2016 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, ISSN 0022-0116, E-ISSN 1573-3564, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Co-occurring emotional distress and chronic pain are a true challenge in the clinic. This combination of symptoms is quite common but associated with poor treatment results, frequent relapses and costly dysfunction. This paper describes a transdiagnostic approach to the problem by focusing on psychological processes that drive both the emotional as well as the pain problem. Avoidance and context (in)sensitivity are suggested as potential transdiagnostic factors that might be targeted in treatment. Since both pain and distress are aversive, they may be avoided. This may be helpful in the short-term, but paradoxically the avoidance maintains the problem in the long-term. Context sensitivity concerns how well our responses are in tune with the changing demands of the environment. We propose that context insensitivity may drive emotional distress and pain problems. We present data that show that disclosure of pain is important emotionally, but that it is also a challenge to respond in manner that is sensitive to the social context. Indeed, disclosing how we feel emotionally or concerning pain might be helpful in some situations, but enhance the problem in others. Finally, we outline a hybrid treatment that combines exposure for pain (feared movements) and emotions (disclosure) with context sensitivity training. While such new treatments are promising, there remains a dire need for more clinical research to test and improve treatments for co-occurring emotional distress and pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Context sensitivity, Transdiagnostics, Emotional distress, Chronic pain, Co-occurring, Hybrid treatment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51457 (URN)10.1007/s10879-016-9323-x (DOI)000379297500002 ()2-s2.0-84961174916 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9462-0256

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