oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Ludvigsson, Jonas F.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 212) Show all publications
Tjernberg, A. R., Woksepp, H., Sandholm, K., Johansson, M., Dahle, C., Ludvigsson, J. F., . . . Ekdahl, K. N. (2020). Celiac disease and complement activation in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. European Journal of Pediatrics, 179(1), 133-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Celiac disease and complement activation in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show others...
2020 (English)In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 179, no 1, p. 133-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individuals with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The aim of this study was to explore whether the complement response to Streptococcus pneumoniae differed according to CD status, and could serve as an explanation for the excess risk of IPD in CD. Twenty-two children with CD and 18 controls, born 1999-2008, were included at Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden. The degree of complement activation was evaluated by comparing levels of activation products C3a and sC5b-9 in plasma incubated for 30 min with Streptococcus pneumoniae and in non-incubated plasma. Complement analyses were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pneumococcal stimulation caused a statistically significant increase in C3a as well as sC5b-9 in both children with CD and controls but there was no difference in response between the groups. After incubation, C3a increased on average 4.6 times and sC5b-9 22 times in both the CD and the control group (p = 0.497 and p = 0.724 respectively). Conclusion: Complement response to Streptococcus pneumoniae seems to be similar in children with and without CD and is thus unlikely to contribute to the increased susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in CD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Coeliac, Pneumococcal, Infection, Innate immunity, MBL
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77992 (URN)10.1007/s00431-019-03490-w (DOI)000494392200001 ()31691001 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074845938 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 522-2A09-195 2016-2075-5.1 2018-04087
Note

Funding Agencies:

Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden  658741

Region Kalmar County 

Swedish Celiac Society 

Fulbright Commission  

Linnaeus University  

Research Council of Norway 274332

Örebro University 

Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Ludvigsson, J. F. & Lebwohl, B. (2020). Three papers indicate that amount of gluten play a role for celiac disease: But only a minor role. Acta Paediatrica, 109(1), 8-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three papers indicate that amount of gluten play a role for celiac disease: But only a minor role
2020 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 8-10Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2020
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77878 (URN)10.1111/apa.15057 (DOI)000495084200001 ()31701547 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074843156 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Bergman, D., Clemente, M. S., Khalili, F., Agréus, L., Hultcrantz, R. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2019). A nationwide cohort study of the incidence of microscopic colitis in Sweden. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 49(11), 1395-1400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nationwide cohort study of the incidence of microscopic colitis in Sweden
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 1395-1400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Epidemiological studies of microscopic colitis have shown varying but increasing incidence rates. Aim To assess the incidence of microscopic colitis in Sweden.

Methods: Nationwide cohort study performed in 1995-2015 based on biopsy reports. Age-specific and age-standardised incidence rates were calculated.

Results: We identified 13 844 patients with an incident diagnosis of microscopic colitis. Lymphocytic colitis (n = 9238) constituted 67% and collagenous colitis (n = 4606) 33% of microscopic colitis. The mean age at time of diagnosis of microscopic colitis was 60.2 years (58.6 for lymphocytic colitis, 63.3 for collagenous colitis). The lifetime risk of developing microscopic colitis was 0.87% in women (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.85-0.88) and 0.35% in men (95% CI: 0.34-0.36). From 2006, the overall incidence of microscopic colitis was approximately 10.5 cases per 100 000 person-years (95% CI: 9.8-11.3) with higher rates in women (72% of cases, incidence rate ratio = 2.4 (95% CI: 2.3-2.5) and the elderly with increasing rates up to 75-79 years. From 2006-2015, there was a significant increase of 1% per year (P = 0.02) in the overall microscopic colitis incidence rate in women; the estimated annual percent change was similar, although not statistically significant, in men (P = 0.15).

Conclusions: In Sweden, the incidence of microscopic colitis is still increasing in women, although the rate appears to be stabilising. The incidence is particularly high in women and the elderly up to age 75-79 years. Finally, across a lifetime, 1 in 115 females and 1 in 286 males are expected to be diagnosed with microscopic colitis and thus posing a considerable disease burden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74404 (URN)10.1111/apt.15246 (DOI)000467578300003 ()30983010 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064439743 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Stockholm County Council, 20150405
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Visuri, I., Eriksson, C., Mårdberg, E., Grip, O., Gustavsson, A., Hjortswang, H., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2019). Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG). Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 13(Suppl. 1), S443-S444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, no Suppl. 1, p. S443-S444Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73336 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy222.773 (DOI)000460544502205 ()
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Weimers, P., Halfvarson, J., Sachs, M. C., Ludvigsson, J. F., Peter, I., Olén, O. & Burisch, J. (2019). Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find? [Letter to the editor]. Gut, 68(1), 175-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 175-176Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71215 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316937 (DOI)000455727900023 ()30021791 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050249090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Chen, Q., Larsson, H., Almqvist, C., Chang, Z., Lichtenstein, P., D'Onofrio, B. M. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2019). Association between pharmacotherapy for ADHD in offspring and depression-related specialty care visits by parents with a history of depression. BMC Psychiatry, 19, Article ID 224.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between pharmacotherapy for ADHD in offspring and depression-related specialty care visits by parents with a history of depression
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pharmacotherapy is effective in reducing the core symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We aimed to investigate the concurrent association between pharmacotherapy for ADHD in offspring and depression-related specialty care visits by the parents with a history of depression.

Methods: Using data from a variety of Swedish national registers, we conducted a cohort study with 8-year follow-up of 5605 parents (3872 mothers and 1733 fathers) who had a history of depression and an offspring diagnosed with ADHD. The hazard rate for parental depression-related specialty care visits during exposed periods when the offspring was on medication for treatment of ADHD was compared with the hazard rate during unexposed periods when the offspring was off medication. Within-individual comparisons were employed to control for time-constant confounding factors.

Results: Among mothers, the crude rates of depression-related specialty care visits during exposed and unexposed periods were 61.33 and 63.95 per 100 person-years, respectively. The corresponding rates among fathers were 49.23 and 54.65 per 100 person-years. When the same parent was compared with him or herself, fathers showed a decreased hazard rate for depression-related visits during exposed periods when the offspring was on medication for treatment of ADHD as compared to unexposed periods (hazard ratio, 0.79 [95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 0.90]). No statistically significant associations were observed in mothers.

Conclusions: Among parents with a history of depression, pharmacotherapy for ADHD in offspring is concurrently associated with a decreased rate of depression-related specialty care visits in fathers but not in mothers. Future research with refined measures of parental depression and other time-varying familial factors is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
ADHD, Pharmacotherapy, Depression, Offspring, Parents
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75725 (URN)10.1186/s12888-019-2211-7 (DOI)000475947500001 ()31315609 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069537504 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-2280
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social And Medical Sciences (SIMSAM)  340-2013-5867 

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)  1R01MH102221 

Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Wintzell, V., Svanström, H., Olén, O., Melbye, M., Ludvigsson, J. F. & Pasternak, B. (2019). Association between use of azathioprine and risk of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease: a Swedish-Danish nationwide cohort study. Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, 3(3), 158-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between use of azathioprine and risk of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease: a Swedish-Danish nationwide cohort study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, E-ISSN 2352-4642, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 158-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies have shown an association between use of azathioprine and increased risk of acute pancreatitis in adult inflammatory bowel disease. However, whether an association exists among paediatric patients is not known. We aimed to investigate whether use of azathioprine is associated with the risk of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

Methods: We did a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden (2006-16) and Denmark (2000-16). All paediatric patients (<18 years of age) with inflammatory bowel disease during the study period were identified through hospital records. Episodes of incident azathioprine use and no use of any thiopurine were matched (1:1) using propensity scores, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, previous treatment, indicators of disease severity, and health care use. Incident acute pancreatitis (physician-assigned diagnosis with ICD-10 code K85) occurring in the 90 days following treatment initiation were identified through outpatient and inpatient hospital records.

Findings: We identified 3574 azathioprine episodes and 18 700 no-use episodes, which resulted in 3374 pairs after propensity score matching; baseline characteristics in the matched cohort were well balanced. Among the matched azathioprine episodes, mean age was 14.3 years (SD 3.1), 1854 (54.9%) were male, 1923 (57.0%) had Crohn's disease, and 1451 (43.0%) had ulcerative colitis or unclassified inflammatory bowel disease. Within the first 90 days following initiation of azathioprine, 40 acute pancreatitis events occurred (incidence rate 49.1 events per 1000 person-years) compared with six events in the no-use group (8.4 events per 1000 person-years). Azathioprine use was associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis (incidence rate ratio 5.82 [95% CI 2.47-13.72]; absolute difference 1.0 [95% CI 0.3-2.6] events per 100 patients) during the 90-day risk period.

Interpretation: Use of azathioprine was associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease during the first 90 days following treatment initiation, suggesting the need for regular and rigorous monitoring. The risk of acute pancreatitis needs to be considered when deciding on optimal treatment strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72869 (URN)10.1016/S2352-4642(18)30401-2 (DOI)000458662400016 ()30685366 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061370852 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-01974Åke Wiberg Foundation
Note

Funding Agencies:

Frimurare Barnhuset Foundation

Strategic Research Area Epidemiology programme at Karolinska Institutet

Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Butwicka, A., Olén, O., Larsson, H., Halfvarson, J., Almqvist, C., Lichtenstein, P., . . . Ludvigsson, J. F. (2019). Association of Childhood-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease With Risk of Psychiatric Disorders and Suicide Attempt. JAMA pediatrics, 173(10), 969-978
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Childhood-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease With Risk of Psychiatric Disorders and Suicide Attempt
Show others...
2019 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 173, no 10, p. 969-978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with psychiatric morbidity in adults, although previous studies have not accounted for familial confounding. In children, IBD has an even more severe course, but the association between childhood-onset IBD and psychiatric morbidity remains unclear.

Objective: To examine the risk of psychiatric morbidity in individuals with childhood-onset IBD, controlling for potential confounding shared between siblings.

Design, Setting, and Participants: A population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Swedish national health care and population registers of all children younger than 18 years born from 1973 to 2013. The study included 6464 individuals with a diagnosis of childhood-onset IBD (3228 with ulcerative colitis, 2536 with Crohn disease, and 700 with IBD unclassified) who were compared with 323 200 matched reference individuals from the general population and 6999 siblings of patients with IBD. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. Statistical analysis was performed from January 1, 1973, to December 1, 2013.

Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was any psychiatric disorder and suicide attempt. Secondary outcomes were the following specific psychiatric disorders: psychotic, mood, anxiety, eating, personality, and behavioral disorders; substance misuse; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; autism spectrum disorders; and intellectual disability.

Results: The study included 6464 individuals with a diagnosis of childhood-onset IBD (2831 girls and 3633 boys; mean [SD] age at diagnosis of IBD, 13 [4] years). During a median follow-up time of 9 years, 1117 individuals with IBD (17.3%) received a diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder (incidence rate, 17.1 per 1000 person-years), compared with 38 044 of 323 200 individuals (11.8%) in the general population (incidence rate, 11.2 per 1000 person-years), corresponding to an HR of 1.6 (95% CI, 1.5-1.7), equaling 1 extra case of any psychiatric disorder per 170 person-years. Inflammatory bowel disease was significantly associated with suicide attempt (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7) as well as mood disorders (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.7), anxiety disorders (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.7-2.0) eating disorders (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.0), personality disorders (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4), and autism spectrum disorders (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7) Results were similar for boys and girls. Hazard ratios for any psychiatric disorder were highest in the first year of follow-up but remained statistically significant after more than 5 years. Psychiatric disorders were particularly common for patients with very early-onset IBD (<6 years) and for patients with a parental psychiatric history. Results were largely confirmed by sibling comparison, with similar estimates noted for any psychiatric disorder (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.8) and suicide attempt (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3).

Conclusions and Relevance: Overall, childhood-onset IBD was associated with psychiatric morbidity, confirmed by between-sibling results. Particularly concerning is the increased risk of suicide attempt, suggesting that long-term psychological support be considered for patients with childhood-onset IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2019
National Category
Psychiatry Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75913 (URN)10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2662 (DOI)000492030000017 ()31424531 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070929773 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00788Stockholm County Council, 2018-0718Swedish Society of MedicineThe Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Note

Funding Agencies:

Karolinska Institutet, Strategic Research Programme in Neuroscience (StratNeuro)  

Fredrik O. Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse  2016-00254

Mag-tarmfonden  

Jane and Dan Olsson Foundation  

Mjölkdroppen Foundation  

Bengt Ihre research fellowship in gastroenterology 

Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social and Medical Sciences (SIMSAM)  340-2013-5867

Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Hedman, A., Breithaupt, L., Hübel, C., Thornton, L. M., Tillander, A., Norring, C., . . . Bulik, C. M. (2019). Bidirectional relationship between eating disorders and autoimmune diseases. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 60(7), 803-812
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bidirectional relationship between eating disorders and autoimmune diseases
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 803-812Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Immune system dysfunction may be associated with eating disorders (ED) and could have implications for detection, risk assessment, and treatment of both autoimmune diseases and EDs. However, questions regarding the nature of the relationship between these two disease entities remain. We evaluated the strength of associations for the bidirectional relationships between EDs and autoimmune diseases.

METHODS: In this nationwide population-based study, Swedish registers were linked to establish a cohort of more than 2.5 million individuals born in Sweden between January 1, 1979 and December 31, 2005 and followed up until December 2013. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to investigate: (a) subsequent risk of EDs in individuals with autoimmune diseases; and (b) subsequent risk of autoimmune diseases in individuals with EDs.

RESULTS: We observed a strong, bidirectional relationship between the two illness classes indicating that diagnosis in one illness class increased the risk of the other. In women, the diagnoses of autoimmune disease increased subsequent hazards of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and other eating disorders (OED). Similarly, AN, BN, and OED increased subsequent hazards of autoimmune diseases.Gastrointestinal-related autoimmune diseases such as, celiac disease and Crohn's disease showed a bidirectional relationship with AN and OED. Psoriasis showed a bidirectional relationship with OED. The previous occurence of type 1 diabetes increased the risk for AN, BN, and OED. In men, we did not observe a bidirectional pattern, but prior autoimmune arthritis increased the risk for OED.

CONCLUSIONS: The interactions between EDs and autoimmune diseases support the previously reported associations. The bidirectional risk pattern observed in women suggests either a shared mechanism or a third mediating variable contributing to the association of these illnesses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
anorexia nervosa, autoimmunity, bulimia nervosa, cox regression, hazard, immune system, risk
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68740 (URN)10.1111/jcpp.12958 (DOI)000472977400010 ()30178543 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052927975 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 538-2013-8864
Note

Funding Agencies:

Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI), an initiative of the Klarman Family Foundation  

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship  1000183151 

Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social And Medical Sciences (SIMSAM)  340-2013-5867 

Stockholm County Council (ALF-projects)  

Shire  

Foundation of Hope: Research and Treatment of Mental Illness 

Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Hagström, H., Höijer, J., Andreasson, A., Bottai, M., Johansson, K., Ludvigsson, J. F. & Stephansson, O. (2019). Body mass index in early pregnancy and future risk of severe liver disease: a population-based cohort study. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 49(6), 789-796
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass index in early pregnancy and future risk of severe liver disease: a population-based cohort study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 789-796Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In young men, high body mass index (BMI) has been linked to liver disease later in life, but it is unclear if this also applies to women.

AIM: To study the association between BMI early in life and development of liver disease later in life in women.

METHODS: We obtained data on early pregnancy BMI from 1 139 458 Swedish women between 1992 and 2015. National registers were used to ascertain incident severe liver disease, defined as cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease (hepatocellular carcinoma, oesophageal varices, hepatorenal syndrome or hepatic encephalopathy) or liver failure. A Cox regression model was used to investigate associations of BMI with incident severe liver disease adjusting for maternal age, calendar year, country of birth, smoking, civil status and education.

RESULTS: (95% CI 1.02-1.05). A diagnosis of diabetes was associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease independent of baseline BMI.

CONCLUSION: A high BMI early in life in women is associated with a dose-dependent, increased risk for future severe liver disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Science Ltd., 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72885 (URN)10.1111/apt.15162 (DOI)000459827800015 ()30714185 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060992724 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stockholm County (Clinical Postdoctorial Appointment)  

Bengt Ihre Fellowship 

Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602

Search in DiVA

Show all publications