oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Ludvigsson, Jonas F.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 175) Show all publications
Weimers, P., Halfvarson, J., Sachs, M. C., Ludvigsson, J. F., Peter, I., Olén, O. & Burisch, J. (2019). Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find? [Letter to the editor]. Gut, 68(1), 175-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between inflammatory bowel disease and Parkinson's disease: seek and you shall find?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 175-176Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71215 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316937 (DOI)000455727900023 ()30021791 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050249090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Everhov, Å. H., Sachs, M. C., Malmborg, P., Nordenvall, C., Myrelid, P., Khalili, H., . . . Olén, O. (2019). Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: To investigate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) register-based subtype classifications over a patient's disease course and over time.

METHODS: We examined International Classification of Diseases coding in patients with ≥2 IBD diagnostic listings in the National Patient Register 2002-2014 (n = 44,302).

RESULTS: 18% of the patients changed diagnosis (17% of adults, 29% of children) during a median follow-up of 3.8 years. Of visits with diagnoses of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), 97% were followed by the same diagnosis, whereas 67% of visits with diagnosis IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) were followed by another IBD-U diagnosis. Patients with any diagnostic change changed mostly once (47%) or twice (31%), 39% from UC to CD, 33% from CD to UC and 30% to or from IBD-U. Using a classification algorithm based on the first two diagnoses ('incident classification'), suited for prospective cohort studies, the proportion adult patients with CD, UC, and IBD-U 2002-2014 were 29%, 62%, and 10% (43%, 45%, and 12% in children). A classification model incorporating additional information from surgeries and giving weight to the last 5 years of visits ('prevalent classification'), suited for description of a study population at end of follow-up, classified 31% of adult cases as CD, 58% as UC and 11% as IBD-U (44%, 38%, and 18% in children).

CONCLUSIONS: IBD subtype changed in 18% during follow-up. The proportion with CD increased and UC decreased from definition at start to end of follow-up. IBD-U was more common in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Crohn’s disease, IBD-U, Inflammatory bowel disease, indeterminate colitis, inflammatory bowel disease unclassified, register-based definition, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72038 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2018.1564361 (DOI)30700170 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Ludvigsson, J. F. & Lashkariani, M. (2019). Cohort profile: ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden). Clinical Epidemiology, 11, 101-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cohort profile: ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden)
2019 (English)In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 11, p. 101-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ESPRESSO study constitutes a novel approach to examine the etiology and prognosis of gastrointestinal disease in which histopathology plays a prominent role. Between 2015 and 2017, all pathology departments (n=28) in Sweden were contacted and asked to procure histopathology record data from the gastrointestinal tract (pharynx to anus), liver, gallbladder, and pancreas. For each individual, local histopathology IT personnel retrieved data on personal identity number, date of histopathology, topography (where the biopsy is taken), morphology (biopsy appearance), and where available free text. In total, between 1965 and 2017, histopathology record data were available in 2.1 million unique individuals, but the number of data entries was 6.1 million because more than one biopsy was performed in many of the study participants. Index individuals with histopathology data were matched with up to five controls from the general population. We also identified all first-degree relatives (parents, children, full siblings), and the index individual's first spouse. The total study population consisted of 13.0 million individuals. Data from all the study participants have been linked to Swedish National Healthcare Registers allowing research not only on such aspects as fetal and perinatal conditions and the risk of future gastrointestinal disease but also on the risk of comorbidity and complications (including cancer and death). Furthermore, the ESPRESSO database allows researchers and practitioners to identify diagnoses and disease phenotypes not currently indexed in national registers (including disease precursors). The ESPRESSO database increases the sensitivity and specificity of already-recorded diseases in the national health registers. This paper is an overview of the ESPRESSO database.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE Medical Press Ltd., 2019
Keywords
cohort, gallbladder, gut, liver, pancreas, population-based, colon, pathology, endoscopy, celiac, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, esophagus
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72188 (URN)10.2147/CLEP.S191914 (DOI)000456428300001 ()30679926 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Liu, P.-H., Lebwohl, B., Burke, K. E., Ivey, K. L., Ananthakrishnan, A. N., Lochhead, P., . . . Khalili, H. (2019). Dietary Gluten Intake and Risk of Microscopic Colitis Among US Women without Celiac Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 114(1), 127-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary Gluten Intake and Risk of Microscopic Colitis Among US Women without Celiac Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic watery diarrhea among the elderly. Although the prevalence of celiac disease appears to be higher in patients with microscopic colitis, the relationship between dietary gluten intake and risk of microscopic colitis among individuals without celiac disease has not been explored.

METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 160,744 US women without celiac disease enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the NHSII. Dietary gluten intake was estimated using validated food frequency questionnaires every 4 years. Microscopic colitis was confirmed through medical records review. We used Cox proportional hazard modeling to estimate the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI).

RESULTS: We documented 219 incident cases of microscopic colitis over more than 20 years of follow-up encompassing 3,716,718 person-years (crude incidence rate: 5.9/100,000 person-years) in NHS and NHSII. Dietary gluten intake was not associated with risk of microscopic colitis (Ptrend = 0.88). Compared to individuals in the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted gluten intake, the adjusted HR of microscopic colitis was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.77-1.78) for the middle quintile and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.67-1.58) for the highest quintile. Additional adjustment for primary dietary sources of gluten including refined and whole grains did not materially alter the effect estimates (All Ptrend ≥ 0.69). The null association did not differ according to lymphocytic or collagenous subtypes (Pheterogeneity = 0.72) and was not modified by age, smoking status, or body mass index (All Pinteraction ≥ 0.17).

CONCLUSION: Dietary gluten intake during adulthood was not associated with risk of microscopic colitis among women without celiac disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68919 (URN)10.1038/s41395-018-0267-5 (DOI)30181535 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Örtqvist, A. K., Lundholm, C., Halfvarson, J., Ludvigsson, J. F. & Almqvist, C. (2019). Fetal and early life antibiotics exposure and very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: a population-based study. Gut, 68(2), 218-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal and early life antibiotics exposure and very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: a population-based study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 218-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies on antibiotics exposure and development of IBD (Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC)) may have been biased by familial factors and gastroenteritis. We aimed to estimate the association between antibiotics during pregnancy or infantile age and very early onset (VEO) IBD.

DESIGN: In this cohort study of 827 239 children born in Sweden between 2006 and 2013, we examined the link between exposure to systemic antibiotics and VEO-IBD (diagnosis <6 years of age), using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Information on antibiotics and IBD was retrieved from the nationwide population-based Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the National Patient Register. We specifically examined potential confounding from parental IBD and gastroenteritis.

RESULTS: Children exposed to antibiotics during pregnancy were at increased risk of IBD compared with general population controls (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.93; 95% CI 1.06 to 3.50). Corresponding aHRs were 2.48 (95% CI 1.01 to 6.08) for CD and 1.25 (95% CI 0.47 to 3.26) for UC, respectively. For antibiotics in infantile age, the aHR for IBD was 1.11 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.15); for CD 0.72 (95% CI 0.27 to 1.92) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.45 to 3.39) for UC. Excluding children with gastroenteritis 12 months prior to the first IBD diagnosis retained similar aHR for antibiotics during pregnancy and CD, while the association no longer remained significant for IBD.

CONCLUSION: We found that exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy, but not in infantile age, is associated with an increased risk of VEO-IBD regardless of gastroenteritis. The risk increase for exposure in pregnancy may be due to changes in the microbiota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Antibiotics, crohn’s colitis, epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66361 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2017-314352 (DOI)29321166 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049136111 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Weimers, P., Halfvarson, J., Sachs, M. C., Saunders-Pullman, R., Ludvigsson, J. F., Peter, I., . . . Olén, O. (2019). Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 25(1), 111-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have examined the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Parkinson's disease (PD).

Methods: To estimate the incidence and relative risk of PD development in a cohort of adult IBD, we included all incident IBD patients (n = 39,652) in the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) between 2002 and 2014 (ulcerative colitis [UC]: n = 24,422; Crohn's disease [CD]: n = 11,418; IBD-unclassified [IBD-U]: n = 3812). Each IBD patient was matched for sex, age, year, and place of residence with up to 10 reference individuals (n = 396,520). In a cohort design, all incident PD occurring after the index date was included from the NPR. In a case-control design, all incident PD occurring before the index date was included. The association between IBD and PD and vice versa was investigated by multivariable Cox and logistic regression.

Results: In IBD, there were 103 cases of incident PD, resulting in hazard ratios (HRs) for PD of 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.7; P = 0.04) in UC, 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7) in CD, and 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8-3.0) in IBD-U. However, these effects disappeared when adjusting for number of medical visits during follow-up to minimize potential surveillance bias. In a case-control analysis, IBD patients were more likely to have prevalent PD at the time of IBD diagnosis than matched controls, with odds ratios of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.2-1.8) in all IBD patients, 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.9) for UC, and 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.3) for CD patients alone.

Conclusions: IBD is associated with an increased risk of PD, but some of this association might be explained by surveillance bias. 10.1093/ibd/izy190_video1izy190.video15785623138001.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71220 (URN)10.1093/ibd/izy190 (DOI)29788069 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058603803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Ludvigsson, J. F. & Emilsson, L. (2019). Letter: the relationship between diet, mood and mucosal healing in coeliac disease remains to be verified-authors' reply [Letter to the editor]. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 49(1), 120-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter: the relationship between diet, mood and mucosal healing in coeliac disease remains to be verified-authors' reply
2019 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 120-120Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71134 (URN)10.1111/apt.15055 (DOI)000452872100017 ()30548318 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058222822 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Emilsson, L. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2019). Letter: you can stare at a vicious circle, but you can also try to break it-psychological health and coeliac disease. Authors' reply [Letter to the editor]. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 49(3), 348-349
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter: you can stare at a vicious circle, but you can also try to break it-psychological health and coeliac disease. Authors' reply
2019 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 348-349Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72082 (URN)10.1111/apt.15096 (DOI)000456172300017 ()30663104 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060151605 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Khalili, H., Hakansson, N., Chan, S. S., Ludvigsson, J. F., Olen, O., Chan, A. T., . . . Wolk, A. (2019). No Association Between Consumption of Sweetened Beverages and Later Risk of Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 17(1), 123-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No Association Between Consumption of Sweetened Beverages and Later Risk of Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 123-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Consumption of sweetened beverages has been associated with inflammation, based on measurements of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor, as well as immune-mediated disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. We investigated associations with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).

METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 83,042 participants (44-83 years old) enrolled in the Cohort of Swedish Men or the Swedish Mammography Study. Dietary and lifestyle data were collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1997. Diagnoses of CD and UC were ascertained from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CIs.

RESULTS: Through December of 2014, we confirmed 143 incident cases of CD (incidence; rate = 11 cases/100,000 person-years) and 349 incident cases of UC (incidence rate = 28 cases/100,000 person-years) over 1,264,345 person-years of follow up. Consumption of sweetened beverages was not associated with increased risk of CD (Ptrend = 0.34) or UC (Ptrend = 0.40). Compared to participants who reported no consumption of sweetened beverages, the multivariable-adjusted HRs for 1 or more servings per day were 1.02 for CD (95% CI, 0.60-1.73) and 1.14 for UC (95% CI, 0.83-1.57). The association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of CD or UC were not modified by age, sex (cohort), body mass index, or smoking (all Pinteraction ≥ 0.12).

CONCLUSION: In analyses of data from 2 large prospective cohort studies from Sweden, we observed no evidence for associations between consumption of sweetened beverages and later risk of CD or UC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
BMI, CoSM, IBD, SMC, epidemiology
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67004 (URN)10.1016/j.cgh.2018.04.059 (DOI)000453252900027 ()29751165 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056246547 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationStockholm County Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases  K24 DK098311  K23 DK099681 

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation Senior Research Award  

Swedish Medical Society (Fund for Research in Gastroenterology)  

Swedish Medical Society (Ihre Foundation)  

Magtarmfonden  

Jane and Dan Olsson foundation  

Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Ludvigsson, J. F., Lebwohl, B., Chen, Q., Bröms, G., Wolf, R. L., Green, P. H. R. & Emilsson, L. (2018). Anxiety after coeliac disease diagnosis predicts mucosal healing: a population-based study. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 48(10), 1091-1098
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety after coeliac disease diagnosis predicts mucosal healing: a population-based study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1091-1098Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coeliac disease has been linked to anxiety and depression. However, their association with mucosal healing is unknown.

Aim: To examine the relationship between anxiety, depression and mucosal healing in coeliac disease.

Methods: Between 1969 and 2008, we collected data on all small intestinal biopsies with villous atrophy from Sweden's 28 pathology departments. We restricted our cohort to individuals with data on follow-up biopsy (either persistent villous atrophy [n = 3317] or mucosal healing [n = 4331]). Through Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for anxiety or depression.

Results: Conclusion APPENDIX During follow-up, 123 (2.8/1000 person-years) individuals with mucosal healing had developed anxiety, compared to 94 (2.1/1000 person-years) with persistent villous atrophy. Mucosal healing was hence associated with a higher risk of future anxiety (HR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.12-1.96). Similarly, 167 (3.8/1000 person-years) individuals with mucosal healing developed depression, compared to 148 (3.3/1000 person-years) with persistent villous atrophy, corresponding to a HR of 1.25 (95% CI = 0.99-1.59). Mucosal healing was more common in individuals with prior diagnoses of anxiety or depression before follow-up biopsy. Anxiety diagnosed between diagnostic and follow-up biopsy for coeliac disease was associated with an almost nine-fold increased chance of mucosal healing (odds ratio = 8.94; 95%CI = 2.03-39.27).

Conclusion: Anxiety and depression are more common in coeliac disease patients with mucosal healing, both before and after follow-up biopsy, an association potentially mediated through more vigilant compliance with a gluten-free diet. This finding raises concern that achieving the goal of mucosal healing may come at a cost of an increased risk of mood disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70301 (URN)10.1111/apt.14991 (DOI)000449555100005 ()30288774 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054488273 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationSwedish Research CouncilStockholm County Council
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University Hospital

Available from: 2018-11-23 Created: 2018-11-23 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602

Search in DiVA

Show all publications