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Ludvigsson, Jonas F.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602
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Publications (10 of 407) Show all publications
Sun, J., Yao, J., Olén, O., Halfvarson, J., Bergman, D., Ebrahimi, F., . . . Ludvigsson, J. F. (2024). Familial coaggregation of inflammatory bowel disease with cardiovascular disease: a nationwide multigenerational cohort study [Letter to the editor]. Gut, Article ID gutjnl-2023-331632.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Familial coaggregation of inflammatory bowel disease with cardiovascular disease: a nationwide multigenerational cohort study
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2024 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, article id gutjnl-2023-331632Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
Keywords
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, EPIDEMIOLOGY, IBD
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110624 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2023-331632 (DOI)001143643100001 ()38184319 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183352821 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00424
Note

This study was supported by the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization (to JS; grant number: not applicable) and FORTE (to JFL; grant number: 2016-00424).

Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Vujasinovic, M., Elbe, P., Ekheden, I., Wang, Q.-L., Thuresson, M., Roelstraete, B., . . . Ludvigsson, J. F. (2024). Gastrointestinal cancer precursor risk and mortality in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: a nationwide cohort study. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastrointestinal cancer precursor risk and mortality in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: a nationwide cohort study
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2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a precursor of pancreatic cancer. While earlier research has shown a high prevalence of synchronous/metachronous extrapancreatic tumors in IPMN patients, these studies have often been small with retrospective data collection. The aim of the study was to examine absolute and relative risks of non-pancreatic gastrointestinal (GI) cancer precursors and mortality in histologically confirmed IPMN.

Methods: Through the nationwide ESPRESSO histopathology cohort, we retrieved data on IPMN between 1965 and 2016. Each index case was matched to <= 5 general population controls. Through Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for future GI cancer precursors and death.

Results: A total of 117 patients with IPMN and 539 age- and sex-matched controls were included. Over a median of 2.1 years of follow up, we confirmed two (1.7%) incident GI cancer precursors in IPMN vs. four (0.7%) in controls, corresponding to an HR of 1.89 (95%CI = 0.34-10.55). By contrast, IPMN patients were at increased risk of death (HR 3.61 (95%CI = 1.79-7.27)). The most common cause of death in IPMN was pancreatic cancer (n = 14; 45.2% of all deaths).

Conclusions: We found no association between IPMN and other GI cancer precursors. This argues against comprehensive routine surveillance for other GI cancer precursors in IPMN patients. Mortality was increased in IPMN with pancreatic cancer being the most common cause of death, indicating the need for lifelong follow up in all resected and non-resected patients with IPMN. However, results should be confirmed in larger cohorts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
IPMN, cancer, gastrointestinal, adenoma, Barrett
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111908 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2024.2310162 (DOI)001162133900001 ()38351653 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2024-02-26 Created: 2024-02-26 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Mårild, K., Söderling, J., Stephansson, O., Axelrad, J., Halfvarson, J., Bröms, G., . . . Ludvigsson, J. F. (2024). Histological remission in inflammatory bowel disease and female fertility: A nationwide study. Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Histological remission in inflammatory bowel disease and female fertility: A nationwide study
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2024 (English)In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is linked to reduced female fertility, but it is unclear how fertility rates vary by histological disease activity.

METHODS: Nationwide IBD cohort of Swedish women aged 15-44 years. We examined fertility rates during periods with vs. without histological inflammation (n=21,046; follow-up: 1990-2016) and during periods with vs. without clinical activity (IBD-related hospitalization, surgery, or treatment escalation) (n=24,995; follow-up: 2006-2020). Accounting for socio-demographics and comorbidities, we used Poisson regression to estimate adjusted fertility rate ratios (aFRRs) for live-births conceived during 12-month-periods of histological inflammation (vs. histological remission) and 3-month-periods of clinically active IBD (vs. quiescent IBD).

RESULTS: During periods with vs. without histological inflammation, there were 6.35 (95%CI=5.98-6.73) and 7.09 (95%CI=6.48-7.70) live-births conceived per 100 person-years of follow-up, respectively, or one fewer child per fourteen women with 10 years of histological inflammation (aFRR=0.90; 95%CI=0.81-1.00). In women with histological inflammation fertility was similarly reduced in ulcerative colitis (UC, aFRR=0.89 [95%CI=0.78-1.02]) and Crohn's disease (CD, aFRR=0.86 [95%CI=0.72-1.04]). Clinical IBD activity was associated with an aFRR of 0.76 (95%CI=0.72-0.79) or one fewer child per six women with 10 years of clinical activity. Fertility was reduced in clinically active UC (aFRR=0.75 [95%CI=0.70-0.81]) and CD (aFRR=0.76 [95%CI=0.70-0.82]). Finally, also among women with clinically quiescent IBD, histological inflammation (vs. histological remission) was associated with reduced fertility (aFRR=0.85 [95%CI=0.73-0.98]).

CONCLUSIONS: An association between histological and clinical activity and reduced female fertility in CD and UC was found. Notably, histological inflammation was linked to reduced fertility also in women with clinically quiescent IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Gastroenterology Association Institute, 2024
Keywords
Histology, Population-based, Remission
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111491 (URN)10.1053/j.gastro.2024.01.018 (DOI)38331202 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF), S20-0007Swedish Research Council, 2020-01980; 2020-02002Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-935346/935415/935418; SLS-789611Karolinska InstituteNIH (National Institutes of Health), K23DK124570Region Stockholm, 20170670
Note

Grant support: KM: ALF-funding from Region Västra Götaland, grants from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, Birgitta och Göran Karlssons foundation, The Swedish Society for Medical Research (S20-0007), The Swedish Research Council (Dnr 2020-01980), The Swedish Society of Medicine (SLS-935346/935415/935418). JFL: Karolinska Institutet. OO: Swedish Research Council (Dnr: 2020-02002), The Swedish Society of Medicine (SLS-789611), ALF (20190638). JA: Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, the Judith Stewart Colton Center for Autoimmunity, and the NIH NIDDK Diseases K23DK124570. GB: Stockholm Region clinical postdoctoral appointment (Dnr: 20170670).

Available from: 2024-02-09 Created: 2024-02-09 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Sun, J., Yao, J., Olén, O., Halfvarson, J., Bergman, D., Ebrahimi, F., . . . Ludvigsson, J. F. (2024). Long-term risk of myocarditis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden. American Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term risk of myocarditis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Despite a suggested link between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and myocarditis, the association has not been well-established. This study aimed to investigate the long-term risk of myocarditis in patients with IBD.

METHODS: This nationwide cohort involved all patients with biopsy-confirmed IBD in Sweden (1969-2017) (n=83,264, Crohn's disease [CD, n=24,738], ulcerative colitis [UC, n=46,409], and IBD-unclassified [IBD-U, n=12,117]), general population reference individuals (n=391,344), and IBD-free full siblings (n=96,149), and followed until 2019. Primary outcome was incident myocarditis and secondary outcome was severe myocarditis (complicated with heart failure, death, or readmission). Flexible parametric survival models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and cumulative incidence of outcomes, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 12 years, there were 256 myocarditis cases in IBD patients (incidence rate [IR]=22.6/100,000 person-years) and 710 in reference individuals (IR=12.9), with an aHR of 1.55 (95%CI: 1.33 to 1.81). The increased risk persisted through 20 years after IBD diagnosis, corresponding to one extra myocarditis case in 735 IBD patients until then. This increased risk was observed in CD (aHR=1.48 [1.11 to 1.97]) and UC (aHR=1.58 [1.30 to 1.93]). IBD was also associated with severe myocarditis (IR: 10.1 vs. 3.5; aHR=2.44 [1.89 to 3.15]), irrespective of IBD subtypes (CD: aHR=2.39 [1.43 to 4.01], UC: aHR=2.82 [1.99 to 4.00], and IBD-U: aHR=3.14 [1.55 to 6.33]). Sibling comparison analyses yielded similar results.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with IBD had an increased risk of myocarditis, especially severe myocarditis, for ≥20 years after diagnosis, but absolute risks were low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2024
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111407 (URN)10.14309/ajg.0000000000002701 (DOI)38315442 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-06 Created: 2024-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Maret-Ouda, J., Ström, J. C., Roelstraete, B., Emilsson, L., Joshi, A. D., Khalili, H. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2023). Appendectomy and future risk of microscopic colitis: a population-based case-control study in Sweden. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 21(2), 467-475.e2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Appendectomy and future risk of microscopic colitis: a population-based case-control study in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 467-475.e2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Microscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory bowel disease and a common cause of chronic diarrhea. Appendectomy has been suggested to have immunomodulating effects in the colon, influencing the risk of gastrointestinal disease. The relationship between appendectomy and MC has only been sparsely studied.

METHODS: This was a case-control study based on the nationwide ESPRESSO cohort, consisting of histopathological examinations in Sweden, linked to national registers. Patients with MC were matched to population controls by age, sex, calendar year of biopsy and county of residence. Data on antecedent appendectomy and comorbidities were retrieved from the Patient Register. Unconditional logistic regression models were conducted presenting odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cl) adjusted for country of birth and matching factors. Further sub-analyses were made based on MC subtypes (lymphocytic colitis [LC] and collagenous colitis [CC]), follow-up time post appendectomy and severity of appendicitis.

RESULTS: The study included 14,520 cases of MC and 69,491 controls, among these 7.6% (n=1,103) and 5.1% (n=3,510), respectively, had a previous appendectomy ≥1 year prior to MC/matching date. Patients with a previous appendectomy had an increased risk of MC in total (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.40-1.61); and per subtype CC (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.48-1.88), LC (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.30-1.55). The risk remained elevated throughout follow-up, and the highest risk was observed in non-complicated appendicitis.

CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide case-control study found a modestly increased risk of developing MC following appendectomy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Appendicitis, gastrointestinal, laparoscopy, microscopic colitis, population-based, surgery
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-99647 (URN)10.1016/j.cgh.2022.05.037 (DOI)001050130000001 ()35716902 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85135323025 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Wang, K., Olén, O., Emilsson, L., Khalili, H., Halfvarson, J., Song, M. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2023). Association of inflammatory bowel disease in first-degree relatives with risk of colorectal cancer: A nationwide case-control study in Sweden. International Journal of Cancer, 152(11), 2303-2313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of inflammatory bowel disease in first-degree relatives with risk of colorectal cancer: A nationwide case-control study in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 152, no 11, p. 2303-2313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to assess the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) history in first-degree relatives (FDRs) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We conducted a nationwide case-control study in Sweden among 69,659 CRC cases and 343,032 non-CRC controls matched on age, sex, birth year, and residence county. Through linkage of multi-generation register and the nationwide ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden) cohort, we ascertained IBD diagnoses among parents, full siblings, and offspring of the index individuals. Odds ratios (ORs) of CRC associated with IBD family history were calculated using conditional logistic regression. 2.2% of both CRC cases (1,566/69,659) and controls (7,676/343,027) had ≥1 FDR with IBD history. After adjusting for family history of CRC, we observed no increased risk of CRC in FDRs of IBD patients (OR, 0.96; 95%CI, 0.91-1.02). The null association was consistent according to IBD subtype (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis), number of FDRs with IBD (1 or ≥2), age at first IBD diagnosis in FDRs (<18, 18-39, 40-59, or ≥60 years), maximum location/extent of IBD, or FDR relation (parent, sibling, or offspring). The null association remained for early-onset CRC (diagnosed at age <50 years). In conclusion, IBD history in FDRs was not associated with an increased risk of CRC. Our findings suggest that extra screening for CRC may not be needed in the offspring, siblings, or parents of IBD patients, and strengthen the theory that it is the actual inflammation or atypia of the colon in IBD patients that confers the increased CRC risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Colorectal cancer, family history, first-degree relatives, inflammatory bowel disease
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-104139 (URN)10.1002/ijc.34470 (DOI)000936325500001 ()36760205 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148517828 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-02002Swedish Cancer Society
Note

Funding agencies:

United States Department of Health & Human Services

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA R00 CA215314 U01 CA261961 R01 CA263776

American Cancer Society MRSG-17-220-01-NEC

ALF 20190638

Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2023-05-19Bibliographically approved
Ahlberg, R., Garcia-Argibay, M., Du Rietz, E., Butwicka, A., Cortese, S., D'Onofrio, B. M., . . . Larsson, H. (2023). Associations Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), ADHD Medication and Shorter Height: A Quasi-Experimental and Family-based Study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 62(12), 1316-1325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), ADHD Medication and Shorter Height: A Quasi-Experimental and Family-based Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 62, no 12, p. 1316-1325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and shorter height is unclear. This study examined the risk of shorter height in individuals with ADHD, and the influence of prenatal factors, ADHD medication, psychiatric comorbidity, socioeconomic factors and familial liability.

METHOD: We draw on Swedish National Registers for two different study designs. First, height data for 14,268 individuals with ADHD and 71,339 controls were stratified into two groups: 1: Before and 2: After stimulant treatment were introduced in Sweden. Second, we used a family-based design including 833,172 relatives without ADHD with different levels of relatedness to the individuals with ADHD and matched controls.

RESULTS: ADHD was associated with shorter height both before (below average height: OR=1.31, 95 % CI=1.22-1.41) and after (below average height: OR=1.21, 95 % CI=1.13-1.31) stimulants for ADHD were introduced in Sweden and was of similar magnitude in both cohorts. The association between ADHD and shorter height attenuated after adjustment for prenatal factors, psychiatric disorders and SES. Relatives of individuals with ADHD had an increased risk of shorter height (below average height in full siblings: OR=1.14, 95 % CI=1.09-1.19; maternal half siblings: OR=1.10, 95 % CI=1.01-1.20; paternal half siblings: OR=1.15, 95 % CI=1.07-1.24, first full cousins: OR=1.10, 95 % CI=1.08-1.12).

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that ADHD is associated with shorter height. On a population level, this association was present both before and after ADHD-medications were available in Sweden. The association between ADHD and height was partly explained by prenatal factors, psychiatric comorbidity, low SES and a shared familial liability for ADHD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
ADHD, ADHD medication, adult height
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-105677 (URN)10.1016/j.jaac.2023.03.015 (DOI)001131825800001 ()37084883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159192997 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00788; SLS-969059The Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2021-0115Region Stockholm, 2019-01172Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, PD20-0036
Available from: 2023-04-24 Created: 2023-04-24 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Faye, A. S., Axelrad, J., Sun, J., Halfvarson, J., Söderling, J., Olén, O. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2023). Atherosclerosis as a Risk Factor for IBD: A Population-Based Case-Control Study. American Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atherosclerosis as a Risk Factor for IBD: A Population-Based Case-Control Study
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2023 (English)In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

Data suggest atherosclerotic-related inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but large-scale studies are missing.

METHODS: In this nationwide case-control study, we used the Swedish Patient Register and the ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden) cohort to identify adult cases of incident IBD between 2002-2021, with each case matched to up to 10 general population controls. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for exposure to an atherosclerotic-related condition (myocardial infarction, thromboembolic stroke, or atherosclerosis itself) prior to being diagnosed with IBD.

RESULTS:

There were a total of 56,212 individuals with IBD, and 531,014 controls. Of these 2,334 (4.2%) cases and 18,222 (3.4%) controls had a prior diagnosis of an atherosclerotic-related condition, corresponding to an OR of 1.30 (95%CI 1.24-1.37). Results were statistically significant for both Crohn's disease (OR 1.37, 95%CI 1.26-1.48) and ulcerative colitis (OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.20-1.35), as well as for individuals who developed IBD at 40-59 and ≥60 years-old. Additionally, associations persisted when adjusting for underlying comorbidities, including presence of immune-mediated diseases, as well as prior aspirin and/or statin use. The highest odds of an atherosclerotic-related condition were seen in the 6-12 months prior to IBD diagnosis, though odds were increased even ≥5 years prior. A higher magnitude of odds was also observed when having two or more atherosclerotic-related conditions as compared to only one.

CONCLUSIONS:

A history of an atherosclerotic-related condition is associated with increased odds of developing IBD, particularly among older adults. Future studies should investigate whether drugs targeting atherosclerotic-related inflammation may prevent IBD in higher-risk individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2023
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108360 (URN)10.14309/ajg.0000000000002502 (DOI)37721310 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-09-19 Created: 2023-09-19 Last updated: 2023-09-19Bibliographically approved
Simon, T. G., Roelstraete, B., Alkhouri, N., Hagström, H., Sundström, J. & Ludvigsson, J. F. (2023). Cardiovascular disease risk in paediatric and young adult non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Gut, 72(3), 573-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular disease risk in paediatric and young adult non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
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2023 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 573-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Longitudinal evidence is lacking regarding the long-term risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in children and young adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

DESIGN: This nationwide cohort study included all Swedish children and young adults ≤25 years old with histologically confirmed NAFLD and without underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline (1966-2016; n=699). NAFLD was defined from prospectively recorded histopathology, and further categorised as simple steatosis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD patients were matched to ≤5 population controls without NAFLD or CVD (n=3353). Using Cox proportional hazards modelling, we calculated multivariable-adjusted HRs (aHRs) and 95% CIs for incident MACE (ie, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure or cardiovascular mortality). In secondary analyses, we also explored rates of incident cardiac arrhythmias.

RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 16.6 years, incident MACE was confirmed in 33 NAFLD patients and 52 controls. NAFLD patients had significantly higher rates of MACE than controls (3.1 vs 0.9/1000 person-years (PY); difference=2.1/1000 PY; aHR=2.33, 95% CI=1.43 to 3.78), including higher rates of ischaemic heart disease (difference=1.4/1000 PY; aHR=3.07, 95% CI 1.62 to 5.83) and congestive heart failure (difference=0.5/1000 PY; aHR=3.89, 95% CI=1.20 to 12.64). Rates of incident MACE outcomes appeared to be further augmented with NASH (aHR=5.27, 95% CI=1.96 to 14.19). In secondary analyses, NAFLD patients also had significantly higher rates of cardiac arrythmias (aHR=3.16, 95% CI=1.49 to 6.68).

CONCLUSION: Compared with matched population controls, children and young adults with biopsy-proven NAFLD had significantly higher rates of incident MACE, including ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. Research to better characterise cardiovascular risk in children and young adults with NAFLD should be prioritised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS, CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, FATTY LIVER, HEPATIC FIBROSIS
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102751 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2022-328105 (DOI)000899672000001 ()36522149 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144869678 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Stockholm
Note

Funding agency:

United States Department of Health & Human Services

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA K23 DK122104

Available from: 2022-12-16 Created: 2022-12-16 Last updated: 2023-03-15Bibliographically approved
Khalili, H., Hakansson, N., Casey, K., Lopes, E., Ludvigsson, J. F., Chan, A. T., . . . Wolk, A. (2023). Diet Quality and Risk of Older-Onset Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 17(5), 746-753
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet Quality and Risk of Older-Onset Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 746-753Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To assess the relationship between diet quality and risk of older-onset Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).

METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 83,147 participants from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. We used food frequency questionnaire to calculate adherence scores to multiple derived health diet patterns: Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015), Healthful Plant-Based Diet Index (HPDI), and modified Mediterranean Diet Score (mMED) at baseline in 1997 in both cohorts. Diagnoses of CD and UC were retrieved from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs.

FINDINGS: Through December of 2017, we confirmed 164 incident cases of CD and 395 incident cases of UC. Comparing the highest to the lowest quartiles, the adjusted HRs of CD were 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48, 1.12, Ptrend = 0.123) for AHEI; 0.90 (0.57, 1.41, Ptrend = 0.736) for HEI 2015; 0.52 (95% CI 0.32, 0.85, Ptrend = 0.011) for HPDI; and 0.58 (95% CI 0.32, 1.06, Ptrend = 0.044) for mMED. In contrast, we did not observe an association between any diet quality score and risk of UC.

INTERPRETATION: We found that several healthy eating patterns were associated with a lower risk of older-onset CD. Our findings provide a rationale for adapting different healthy dietary patterns based on individuals' food preferences and traditions for designing future prevention strategies for IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Crohn's disease, diet quality, epidemiology, nutrition, ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102750 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjac184 (DOI)000915090300001 ()36521021 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166177769 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00644
Note

Funding agency:

Crohn's and Colitis Senior Research Award

Available from: 2022-12-16 Created: 2022-12-16 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1024-5602

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