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Nilsen, B. B., Yngve, A. & Werner, B. (2018). Do substantial BMI reduction episodes among Swedish schoolchildren have any impact on their final height?. Acta Paediatrica, 107(7), 1223-1229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do substantial BMI reduction episodes among Swedish schoolchildren have any impact on their final height?
2018 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 7, p. 1223-1229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study investigated whether substantial body mass index (BMI) reductions in Swedish schoolchildren aged 7-19 years, caused by disease, healthy or unhealthy behaviour, had any impact on their final height.

METHODS: We used height and weight data on 6,572 subjects from two nationally representative longitudinal samples of Swedish children born in 1973 and 1981. These provided information on their final height and any BMI reduction episodes.

RESULTS: Of the 6,572 subjects (50.9% boys), among individuals with information on final height, 1,118 had a BMI reduction of 5% and less than 10%, and 346 had at least one substantial BMI reduction of 10% of more. On a group level, there was no statistically significant difference in the final height of individuals with BMI reductions of 10% or more and those without. The findings were independent of age and the subject's BMI at the start of the reduction episode. However, there were a number of cases where a substantial BMI reduction probably had an impact on the subject's final height.

CONCLUSION: Our study found no evidence that a substantial BMI reduction had any impact on final height on a group level, but further analyses of specific case studies are necessary to determine whether substantial BMI reduction might have an impact on final height.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Body Mass Index reduction, final height, longitudinal study, schoolchildren, weight loss
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64913 (URN)10.1111/apa.14258 (DOI)000435258200018 ()29405369 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042559671 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Monteagudo, C., Scander, H., Nilsen, B. & Yngve, A. (2017). Folate intake in a Swedish adult population: Food sources and predictive factors. Food & Nutrition Research, 61, Article ID 1328960.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Folate intake in a Swedish adult population: Food sources and predictive factors
2017 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 61, article id 1328960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Folate plays an important role in cell metabolism, but international studies show that intake is currently below recommendations, especially among women. The study objective was to identify folate food sources by food group, gender, and age group, and to identify factors influencing folate intake, based on food consumption data for Swedish adults in the 2010-11 Riksmaten study.

Methods: The sample included a representative Swedish population aged 18-80 years (n = 1657; 56.3% female). Food and nutrient intakes were estimated from self-reported food records during 4 consecutive days. Food consumption was categorized into 26 food groups. Stepwise regression was used to analyze food groups as folate sources for participants. Factors predicting the highest folate intake (third tertile) were determined by logistic regression analysis.

Results: Vegetables and pulses represented the most important folate source for all age groups and both genders, especially in women aged 45-64 years (49.7% of total folate intake). The next folate source in importance was dairy products for the youngest group (18-30 years), bread for men, and fruit and berries for women. The likelihood of being in the highest tertile of folate intake (odds ratio = 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.354-2.104) was higher for men. Influencing factors for folate intake in the highest tertile were low body mass index and high educational level in the men, and high educational level, vegetarian diet, organic product consumption, nonsmoking, and alcohol consumption within recommendations in the women.

Conclusion: This study describes the folate intake per food group of Swedish adults according to the 2010-11 Riksmaten survey, identifying vegetables and pulses as the most important source. Data obtained on factors related to folate consumption may be useful for the development of specific nutrition education programs to increase the intake of this vitamin in high-risk groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Dietary habits, Riksmaten study, vegetable consumption, lifestyle habits, demographic differences
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58796 (URN)10.1080/16546628.2017.1328960 (DOI)000403008600001 ()28659736 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

University of Granada 

Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Dernini, S., Berry, E. M., Serra-Majem, L., La Vecchia, C., Capone, R., Medina, F. X., . . . Trichopoulou, A. (2017). Med Diet 4.0: the Mediterranean diet with four sustainable benefits. Public Health Nutrition, 20(7), 1322-1330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Med Diet 4.0: the Mediterranean diet with four sustainable benefits
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2017 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 1322-1330Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To characterize the multiple dimensions and benefits of the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet, in order to revitalize this intangible food heritage at the country level; and to develop a multidimensional framework - the Med Diet 4.0 - in which four sustainability benefits of the Mediterranean diet are presented in parallel: major health and nutrition benefits, low environmental impacts and richness in biodiversity, high sociocultural food values, and positive local economic returns.

Design: A narrative review was applied at the country level to highlight the multiple sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet into a single multidimensional framework: the Med Diet 4.0.

Setting/subjects: We included studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals that contained data on the characterization of sustainable diets and of the Mediterranean diet. The methodological framework approach was finalized through a series of meetings, workshops and conferences where the framework was presented, discussed and ultimately refined.

Results: The Med Diet 4.0 provides a conceptual multidimensional framework to characterize the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model, by applying principles of sustainability to the Mediterranean diet.

Conclusions: By providing a broader understanding of the many sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet, the Med Diet 4.0 can contribute to the revitalization of the Mediterranean diet by improving its current perception not only as a healthy diet but also a sustainable lifestyle model, with country-specific and culturally appropriate variations. It also takes into account the identity and diversity of food cultures and systems, expressed within the notion of the Mediterranean diet, across the Mediterranean region and in other parts of the world. Further multidisciplinary studies are needed for the assessment of the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet to include these new dimensions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
Mediterranean diet, Sustainable diets, Sustainable food systems, Public health nutrition, Food security and nutrition, Sustainability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57867 (URN)10.1017/S1368980016003177 (DOI)000400596400019 ()28003037 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007276015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Nilsen, B. B., Yngve, A., Monteagudo, C., Tellström, R., Scander, H. & Werner, B. (2017). Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven-to nine-year-old Swedish children. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(8), 886-894
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven-to nine-year-old Swedish children
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 886-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the reported frequency of breakfast intake and selected food and beverages in the investigated group of Swedish children in comparison with recommended intakes. Furthermore, the study analyses these food habits and some demographic and lifestyle factors in relation to overweight and obesity.

Methods: This cross-sectional study builds on data collected in 2008 and 2010. Measured anthropometric data and parent questionnaire data were collected. A total of 2620 Swedish children (52.1% boys) aged seven to nine years were included.

Results: The majority of parents reported that their children (95.4%) had breakfast every day. The majority of children had fresh fruit (84.7%) and vegetables (83.9%) most days a week. Only 1.6% of the children were reported to have fast food and 6.0% to have sugar containing soft drinks, four days a week or more. The prevalence of overweight including obesity (OW/OB) was 17.8% for boys, 18.6% for girls. The odds of being OW/OB was higher among those not having breakfast every day (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.96), drinking diet soft drink (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.52-4.42) and skimmed/semi-skimmed milk (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.37-2.36) four days a week or more. Parents being overweight and having low education levels were also related to a higher risk of their children being overweight.

Conclusions: The parental reports of children's food habits pointed at favourable eating patterns for most investigated children. Breakfast skipping, diet soft drinks and low-fat milk consumption were more frequent among OW/OB children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the causal relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Child growth, breakfast, food habits, WHO Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63801 (URN)10.1177/1403494817724951 (DOI)000418185200021 ()29160159 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038350923 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Blaznik, U., Yngve, A., Eržen, I. & Hlastan Ribič, C. (2016). Consumption of fruits and vegetables and probabilistic assessment of the cumulative acute exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides of schoolchildren in Slovenia. Public Health Nutrition, 19(4), 557-563
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of fruits and vegetables and probabilistic assessment of the cumulative acute exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides of schoolchildren in Slovenia
2016 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 557-563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables is a part of recommendations for a healthy diet. The aim of the present study was to assess acute cumulative dietary exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides via fruit and vegetable consumption by the population of schoolchildren aged 11-12 years and the level of risk for their health.

Design: Cumulative probabilistic risk assessment methodology with the index compound approach was applied.

Setting: Slovenia, primary schools.

Subjects: Schoolchildren (n 1145) from thirty-one primary schools in Slovenia. Children were part of the PRO GREENS study 2009/10 which assessed 11-year-olds' consumption of fruit and vegetables in ten European countries.

Results: The cumulative acute exposure amounted to 8·3 (95 % CI 7·7, 10·6) % of the acute reference dose (ARfD) for acephate as index compound (100 µg/kg body weight per d) at the 99·9th percentile for daily intake and to 4·5 (95 % CI 3·5, 4·7) % of the ARfD at the 99·9th percentile for intakes during school time and at lunch. Apples, bananas, oranges and lettuce contributed most to the total acute pesticides intake.

Conclusions: The estimations showed that acute dietary exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides is not a health concern for schoolchildren with the assessed dietary patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
Fruit and vegetables, Pesticides, Cumulative exposure assessment, Slovenia
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition; Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44689 (URN)10.1017/S1368980015001494 (DOI)000372820400025 ()25990202 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84957433623 (Scopus ID)
Projects
PRO GREENS
Note

Funding Agencies:

European Commission

Ministry of Health of the Republic of Slovenia 

Available from: 2015-07-22 Created: 2015-05-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lissner, L., Wijnhoven, T. M., Mehlig, K., Sjöberg, A., Kunesova, M., Yngve, A., . . . Breda, J. (2016). Socioeconomic inequalities in childhood overweight: heterogeneity across five countries in the WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI-2008). International Journal of Obesity, 40(5), 796-802
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic inequalities in childhood overweight: heterogeneity across five countries in the WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI-2008)
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 796-802Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Excess risk of childhood overweight and obesity occurring in socioeconomically disadvantaged families has been demonstrated in numerous studies from high-income regions, including Europe. It is well known that socioeconomic characteristics such as parental education, income and occupation are etiologically relevant to childhood obesity. However, in the pan-European setting, there is reason to believe that inequalities in childhood weight status may vary among countries as a function of differing degrees of socioeconomic development and equity.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we have examined socioeconomic differences in childhood obesity in different parts of the European region using nationally representative data from Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Portugal and Sweden that were collected in 2008 during the first round of the World Health Organization ( WHO) European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative.

RESULTS: Heterogeneity in the association between parental socioeconomic indicators and childhood overweight or obesity was clearly observed across the five countries studied. Positive as well as negative associations were observed between parental socioeconomic indicators and childhood overweight, with statistically significant interactions between country and parental indicators.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings have public health implications for the WHO European Region and underscore the necessity to continue documenting socioeconomic inequalities in obesity in all countries through international surveillance efforts in countries with diverse geographic, social and economic environments. This is a prerequisite for universal as well as targeted preventive actions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51395 (URN)10.1038/ijo.2016.12 (DOI)000377616500010 ()27136760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84966397604 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Ministry of Health

National Center of Public Health and Analyses

Regional Health Inspectorates

Internal Grant Agency of the Ministry of Health IGA NS/9832-4

Lithuanian State Science and Studies Foundation

Lithuanian University of Health Sciences

Research Council of Lithuania SIN-17/2012

Ministry of Health and Regional Health Directorates

Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE)

Directorate-General for Health of Portugal

National Health Institute Doutor Ricardo Jorge in Lisbon, Portugal

National Institute of Health in Rome, Italy

Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, Norway

Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity in Athens, Greece

Directorate-General for Health of France

Karolinska Institute in Huddinge, Sweden

Available from: 2016-07-27 Created: 2016-07-19 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Nilsen, B. B., Yngve, A., Sjöberg, A., Moraeus, L., Lissner, L. & Werner, B. (2016). Using different growth references to measure thinness and overweight among Swedish primary school children showed considerable variations. Acta Paediatrica, 105(10), 1158-1165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using different growth references to measure thinness and overweight among Swedish primary school children showed considerable variations
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2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 10, p. 1158-1165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The study compared how four different growth references determined the prevalence of thinness and overweight, based on height and weight measurements from a nationally representative sample of Swedish children from seven to nine years of age.

Methods: The height and weight measurements of 4,518 Swedish schoolchildren aged seven to nine years were carried out in 2008 using a standardised protocol. The prevalence of different degrees of thinness and overweight were calculated using international growth references from the World Health Organization, the International Obesity Task Force and two Swedish growth references from Werner and Karlberg.

Results: Depending on which growth reference we used, the prevalence of different degrees of thinness varied from 7.5%-16.9% for the boys and 6.9%-13.7% for the girls, while for the prevalence of overweight, including obesity and severe obesity, varied from 16.5%-25.7% for the boys and 18.2-25.2% for the girls. There were also significant gender differences depending on the growth reference we used.

Conclusion: Using four different growth references, two international and two Swedish, produced wide variations in the prevalence of thinness and overweight, together with significant gender differences. In the absence of a global definition, we need both national and international growth references.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
Keywords
Body mass index cut-off levels, childhood, crowth surveillance, obesity, underweight
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science; Nutrition; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50027 (URN)10.1111/apa.13400 (DOI)000383619400022 ()26991338 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84987846807 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-1624, 2006-1506Swedish Research Council, 7509, 2006-7777
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro University, Sweden

Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway

The Swedish University Hospital (ALF)

Karolinska Institut

Region Västra Götaland

Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Wijnhoven, T. M. A., van Raaij, J. M. A., Spinelli, A., Yngve, A., Lissner, L., Spiroski, I., . . . van't Veer, P. (2016). WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: Impact of type of clothing worn during anthropometric measurements and timing of the survey on weight and body mass index outcome measures in 6-9-year-old children. Epidemiology Research International, Article ID 5130317.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: Impact of type of clothing worn during anthropometric measurements and timing of the survey on weight and body mass index outcome measures in 6-9-year-old children
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2016 (English)In: Epidemiology Research International, ISSN 2090-2972, E-ISSN 2090-2980, article id 5130317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The World Health Organization European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) conducted examinations in 6–9-year-old children from 16 countries in the first two rounds of data collection. Allowing participating countries to adhere to their local legal requirements or adapt to other circumstances required developing a flexible protocol for anthropometric procedures.

Objectives: (1) Review intercountry variation in types of clothing worn by children during weight and height measurements, clothes weight adjustments applied, timing of the survey, and duration of data collection; (2) assess the impact of the observed variation in these practices on the children’s weight or body mass index (BMI) outcome measures.

Results: The relative difference between countries’ unadjusted and clothes-adjusted prevalence estimates for overweight was 0.3–11.5%; this figure was 1.4–33.3% for BMI-for-age Z-score values. Monthly fluctuations in mean BMI-for-age Z-score values did not show a systematic seasonal effect. The majority of the monthly BMI-for-age Z-score values did not differ statistically within a country; only 1–3 monthly values were statistically different within some countries.

Conclusions: The findings of the present study suggest that the built-in flexibility in the COSI protocol concerning the data collection practices addressed in the paper can be kept and thus do not necessitate a revision of the COSI protocol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Pediatrics; Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50030 (URN)10.1155/2016/5130317 (DOI)
Projects
WHO COSI
Note

Funding agencies:

FAS/FORTE

Karolinska Institute

Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lehto, E., Ray, C., Haukkala, A., Yngve, A., Thorsdottir, I. & Roos, E. (2015). Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(1), 168-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?
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2015 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 168-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Children, descriptive norms, friends, fruit and vegetable intake, parents, sex differences
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Sociology; Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46102 (URN)10.1017/S0007114515003992 (DOI)000367234800020 ()26450715 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84951568843 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

European Commission

Juho Vainio Foundation

Finnish Cultural Foundation 

Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Scander, H., Tellström, R. & Yngve, A. (2015). Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten. Paper presented at 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 67(Suppl. 1), 200-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten
2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 200-200Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Since appetite control works differently in fluid and solid intake we wanted to analyse the energy contribution from those two types of energy sources.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the beverage contribution of energy in Swedish meals, according to data from the National Survey (Riksmaten 2010-2011).

Method / Design: Around 1800 adult Swedes reported dietary intake data for four consecutive days - specified by portion size, type of meal, time point, day of the week and venue. The intake was reported in a web-based food diary. Energy contribution from drinks and food respectively was analysed, by weekday and type of meal, in regards to sugar containing drinks and those containing alcohol.

Results: The results show that the reported consumption of al-cohol was highest at home on weekends. The contribution of energy from drinks could be rather high, especially at dinner on Friday and Saturday night. The mean energy contribution from drinks in the daily intake was 235 kcal ± 231 (SD). This corresponds to 11.8 ± 10.8 (SD) energy percent (E%), varying from 9.1 (Wednesday) to 17.1 (Satur-day) E%. Problems in the interpretation of the data that need to be closely monitored are for example portion size, reluctance to report sweet and alcohol-containing drinks, difficulties in estimating dilution of different types of cordial and alcohol content in wine and beer.

Conclusions: Drinks were contributing substantially to the total energy intake over the day. The sweet and alcoholic drinks are im-portant in this regard, but also juices and coffee drinks. The problems in regards to the increased alcohol content of beer and red wine on the Swedish market will be further discussed with the Swedish Food Administration, to encourage development of a more comprehensive set of alternatives in the database

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2015
Keywords
Swedish Food Administration, alcohol, food and beverage combination, meal design
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50508 (URN)10.1159/000440895 (DOI)000374988801007 ()
Conference
12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015
Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-31 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7165-279X

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