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Andershed, Anna-KarinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3981-0353
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Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Frogner, L., Gibson, C. L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2018). Childhood Psychopathic Personality and Callous-Unemotional Traits in the Prediction of Conduct Problems. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 88(2), 211-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood Psychopathic Personality and Callous-Unemotional Traits in the Prediction of Conduct Problems
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, ISSN 0002-9432, E-ISSN 1939-0025, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 211-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyzed data from a prospective longitudinal study of Swedish preschoolers to examine whether psychopathic traits and concurrent conduct problems predict future conduct problems (CP) across 1- and 2-year follow-ups into early childhood. We tested the predictive ability of psychopathic traits while controlling for concurrent CP, and also by combining psychopathic traits with concurrent CP. A community sample of 1,867 preschoolers (47% girls) ages 3 to 5 years at baseline was recruited from a Swedish medium-sized municipality. Results from multivariate regression analyses showed that psychopathic traits alone (without co-occurring CP) did not consistently predict continuing childhood CP, but did so, among both boys and girls, in combination with concurrent conduct problems. It is important to note that, the combination of concurrent CP and the entire psychopathic personality, that is, a 3-dimensional psychopathic construct, was a stronger predictor of continuing childhood CP than the combination of concurrent CP and Callous-Unemotional (CU) traits among boys but not among girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2018
Keywords
callous-unemotional traits; conduct problems; early childhood; psychopathic traits
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53547 (URN)10.1037/ort0000205 (DOI)000427477500010 ()27786502 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994236781 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2018). Psychopathic Personality Works Better than CU Traits for Predicting Fearlessness and ADHD Symptoms among Children with Conduct Problems. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 40(1), 26-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic Personality Works Better than CU Traits for Predicting Fearlessness and ADHD Symptoms among Children with Conduct Problems
2018 (English)In: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, ISSN 0882-2689, E-ISSN 1573-3505, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with early-onset conduct problems (CP) are at great risk for future behavior problems, and this risk seems to increase when CP co-occur with psychopathic traits. Even though studies are indicating that the entire psychopathic personality construct may be more useful in designating a meaningful subgroup of children with CP, research on psychopathic traits and CP in childhood have mainly focused on the role of callous unemotional (CU) traits. Prospective longitudinal data of 1867 3- to 5-year-olds (47% girls) followed annually for two years was used to compare groups of children with different combinations of CP and psychopathic traits on fearlessness and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Children with CP and psychopathic personality had higher baseline and stable levels of ADHD symptoms than children with CP only or children with CP and concurrent CU traits, while baseline levels of fearlessness did not differ. They were also more likely to display stable levels of the risky combination of CP and ADHD symptoms. Results were similar for boys and girls. Findings indicate that there are reasons to consider other traits and behaviors as specifiers for subgroups of children with CP over and above CU traits, in order to optimize both diagnostic practice and treatment outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Callous-unemotional traits, Conduct problems, Early childhood, Fearlessness, Psychopathic traits
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66269 (URN)10.1007/s10862-018-9651-0 (DOI)000427993800004 ()29576681 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043391139 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-2440
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Andershed, A.-K. (2017). Organizer of the symposium "Early development of problematic personality traits and early school adjustment - Results from the Swedish prospective longitudinal SOFIA-study".. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizer of the symposium "Early development of problematic personality traits and early school adjustment - Results from the Swedish prospective longitudinal SOFIA-study".
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62179 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Andershed, H., Frogner, L. & Andershed, A.-K. (2017). Psychopathic personality works better than CU traits for predicting fearlessness and ADHD symptoms in children with conduct problems. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic personality works better than CU traits for predicting fearlessness and ADHD symptoms in children with conduct problems
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Children with early-onset conduct problems (CP) are at great risk for future behavior problems, and this risk seems to increase when CP co-occur with psychopathic traits. Even though studies are indicating that the entire psychopathic personality construct may be more useful in designating a meaningful subgroup of children with CP, research on psychopathic traits and CP in childhood have mainly focused on the role of callous unemo-tional (CU) traits. Prospective longitudinal data of 1,867 3- to 5-year-olds (47% girls) followed annually for two years was used to compare groups of children with different combinations of CP and psychopathic traits on fearlessness and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symp-toms. Children with CP and psychopathic personality had higher baseline and stable levels of fearlessness and ADHD symptoms than children with CP only or children with CP and concurrent CU traits. They were also more likely to display stable levels of the very risky combination of CP and ADHD symptoms. Results were similar for boys and girls. Findings indicate that there are reasons to consider other traits and behaviors as specifiers for subgroups of children with CP over and above CU traits, in order to optimize both diagnostic practice and treatment outcomes.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62181 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Bergstrøm, H., Frogner, L., Colins, O. F., Fanti, K. A., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2017). Psychopathic traits during early childhood: Stable over time or rapidly changing?. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychopathic traits during early childhood: Stable over time or rapidly changing?
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Although research has shown psychopathic traits to be moderately to highly stable in late childhood and adolescence, little is known about stability in early childhood, specifically in preschool age. The current study was designed to fill this knowledge gap by assessing stability of psychopathic traits in a large community sample (n = 2,121) of three- to five-year-olds (47% girls) across a two-year time span. The sample displayed stable levels of Grandiose-Deceitful (GD), Callous-Unemotional (CU) and Impulsivity, Need for Stimulation (INS) traits. However, the degree of stability varieda cross these three traits dimensions, and by level of analysis, age, and gender. Rank-order stability ranged from low to very high, but effect sizes indicated less stability than on the mean level, where changes were detected but with small effect sizes, thus demonstrating high stability. This trend emerged for both genders, across development, and age. At an individual level, the great majority of the sample displayed stable levels of psychopathic traits to a large extent, with small gender and age differences. The current study is one of the first that investigates stability in children as young as three years old, and it highlights the possibility of measuring psychopathic traits in early childhood.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62182 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Åström, T., Gumpert, C., Andershed, A.-K. & Forster, M. (2017). The SAVRY Improves Prediction of Reoffending: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Comparative Study. Research on social work practice, 27(6), 683-694
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The SAVRY Improves Prediction of Reoffending: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Comparative Study
2017 (English)In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 683-694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study investigated the utility of the risk assessment “Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth” (SAVRY) within the social services in Stockholm County, Sweden.

Method: SAVRY assessments of 56 adolescents were compared to assessments guided by another instrument (Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis [ADAD]; n = 38) and assessments without support of a structured method (n = 38).

Results: The results showed that social workers conducting SAVRY assessments documented a significantly larger number of risk and protective factors compared to the other assessments, and these factors predicted, with a few exceptions, reoffending to a larger extent. SAVRY summary risk rating significantly predicted the occurrence of serious violent crimes (area under the curve [AUC] = .80, p < .01) and less serious violence (AUC = .70, p < .05).

Conclusions: SAVRY performed at least as well in naturalistic settings as in previous studies conducted in more controlled environments. Furthermore, the SAVRY performed better than the other structured instrument (ADAD).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
SAVRY, risk assessment, delinquency, adolescence, evidence-based assessment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Social Work
Research subject
Psychology; Social Work; Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47884 (URN)10.1177/1049731515605184 (DOI)000415367600005 ()2-s2.0-85029580279 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Note

Funding Agency:

Academy of Social Services in the City of Stockholm, Sweden

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2017). The SOFIA-study: A prospective longitudinal study on social adjustment. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The SOFIA-study: A prospective longitudinal study on social adjustment
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The SOFIA-study is a prospective longitudinal study of approximately 2,000 children in a mid-sized Swedish community. SOFIA is the acronym of Social and Physical Development, Interventions and Adaptation in Swedish, and the main focus of the study is on understanding developmen-tal trajectories of norm breaking, criminal behavior, and the risk and pro-tective factors for the various trajectories. The aim is to answer question such as Which risk factors are the most important in the development of norm breaking behavior? What protects children from a negative devel-opment? Which interventions are given to children with difficulties? The study was initiated in 2010 by professors H. Andershed and A-K. Ander-shed, and has since then assessed the participants in four data collection waves, in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2015. At base-line, the children were 3-5 years old, attending public preschools in the community. Questionnaires have been completed by caregivers, preschool and elementary school teachers, as well as principals and headmasters. The purpose has been to collect information both on the children – their behaviors and charac-teristics, the families – parent-child relationships, caregiver attributes, as well as preschool/school relationships, environment, and conditions. The papers presented in this panel are examples of papers using data from the SOFIA-study.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62180 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hellfeldt, K., Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K., Källström, Å. & Andershed, H. (2017). Understanding preschool precursors to early school adjustment. In: : . Paper presented at Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding preschool precursors to early school adjustment
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Positive early school adjustment has been suggested to provide an important base for future school performance. In fact, positive adjustment to school has emerged as one of the key factors for educational performance and lower rates of psychosocial and conduct problems. Thus, it is essential that we come to a better understanding of why some children exhibit positive early school adjustment while others do not. School adjustment is a comprehensive term, describing how children adapt both socially, behaviorally and academically, including aspects such as (i) children’s connectedness to school, i.e., liking school, (ii) children’s school involvement, i.e., school avoidance and task engagement and, (iii) children’s school performance, i.e., academic achievement. This presentation will give the outline for, and some preliminary descriptive results from a research project aimed at advancing knowledge and identifying the various developmental pathways of potential influential factors on school adjustment; early childhood risk and protective factors that are related to early positive and negative school adjustment. Potential risk and protective factors that will be studied include various preschool/school factors, family and parent-child factors, peer factors, and specific individual factors of the child. The study uses data from four waves of the SOFIA-study, an ongoing prospective longitudinal research program including all children born between 2005 and 2007 attending preschools during the spring of 2010 (>2,000 children) in a midsized Swedish municipality. The knowledge produced in this project can be used to develop strategies and interventions to promote early positive school adjustment, and to prevent early negative school adjustment.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62183 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Brännström, L., Kaunitz, C., Andershed, A.-K., South, S. & Smedslund, G. (2016). Aggression replacement training (ART) for reducing antisocial behavior in adolescents and adults: A systematic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 27, 30-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aggression replacement training (ART) for reducing antisocial behavior in adolescents and adults: A systematic review
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2016 (English)In: Aggression and Violent Behavior, ISSN 1359-1789, E-ISSN 1873-6335, Vol. 27, p. 30-41Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Aggression Replacement Training (ART) is a multimodal program aiming at replacing antisocial behaviors by actively teaching desirable behaviors. The program is frequently used and has been provided within a wide variety of settings, but its effectiveness in its own right has not been addressed in previous reviews. This systematic review examines the effect of ART on antisocial behavior in young people and adults.

Methods: Published and unpublished literature was searched to identify randomized and non-randomized studies comparing ART for adults and youth with usual care, other interventions, or no intervention. Primary outcomes included recidivism in antisocial behavior, while secondary outcomes were related to social skills, anger management and moral reasoning.

Findings: This review identified 16 studies with considerable clinical and methodological diversity. The methodological quality and the post-intervention follow-up of the studies were limited. Almost half of the studies were conducted by researchers who have vested interests in the intervention.

Conclusions: There is an insufficient evidence-base to substantiate the hypothesis that ART has a positive impact on recidivism, self-control, social skills or moral development in adolescents and adults. Further research is warranted by independent investigators exploring the effects of ART on clearly-defined target groups using high standard evaluation designs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Intervention, Effectiveness, Aggression Replacement Training, ART, Delinquency
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Criminology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50573 (URN)10.1016/j.avb.2016.02.006 (DOI)000375516300003 ()2-s2.0-84959188743 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Klingzell, I., Fanti, K., Colins, O., Frogner, L., Andershed, A.-K. & Andershed, H. (2016). Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 47(2), 236-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions
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2016 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 236-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with early onset of conduct problems (CP) are at risk for long lasting psychosocial problems, especially if CP co-occurs with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Joint trajectories of CP and CU traits during early childhood were identified using data from the SOFIA study, following 2031 children longitudinally from ages 3-5 to 5-7 years. The results showed that children exhibiting stable high CP and CU traits were characterized by high levels of fearlessness, and psychopathic traits, including grandiose-deceitfulness, and impulsivity, need for stimulation. Children with decreasing or increasing CP and CU traits were characterized by decreases and increases respectively in their levels of fearlessness and psychopathic traits. Children high on CP and low on CU traits exhibited lower levels of these dimensions. Thus, stability and change of fearlessness and psychopathic traits are associated with stability and change in CP and CU traits, making these temperamental and personality traits promising target candidates for early intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Conduct problems; Callous-unemotional traits; Early childhood; Fearlessness; Psychopathic personality dimensions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47883 (URN)10.1007/s10578-015-0560-0 (DOI)000371606700007 ()26115696 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3981-0353

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