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Strid, Åke, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3315-8835
Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Rodriguez-Calzada, T., Qian, M., Strid, Å., Neugart, S., Schreiner, M., Torres-Pacheco, I. & Guevara-Gonzales, R. (2019). Effect of UV-B radiation on morphology, phenolic compound production, gene expression, and subsequent drought stress responses in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), 134, 94-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of UV-B radiation on morphology, phenolic compound production, gene expression, and subsequent drought stress responses in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)
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2019 (English)In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 134, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been suggested that accumulation of flavonoids could be a key step in development of plant tolerance to different environmental stresses. Moreover, it has been recognized that abiotic stresses such as drought and UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) induce phenolic compound accumulation, suggesting a role for these compounds in drought tolerance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of UV-B exposure on chili pepper (Capsicum annuum, cv. ‘Coronel’) plant performance, phenolic compound production, and gene expression associated with response to subsequent drought stress. Additionally, the phenotypic response to drought stress of these plants was studied. UV-B induced a reduction both in stem length, stem dry weight and number of floral primordia. The largest reduction in these variables was observed when combining UV-B and drought. UV-B-treated well-watered plants displayed fructification approximately 1 week earlier than non-UV-B-treated controls. Flavonoids measured epidermally in leaves significantly increased during UV-B treatment. Specifically, UV-B radiation significantly increased chlorogenic acid and apigenin 8-C-hexoside levels in leaves and a synergistic increase of luteolin 6-C-pentoside-8-C-hexoside was obtained by UV-B and subsequent drought stress. Gene expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes also increased during UV-B treatments. On the other hand, expression of genes related to an oxidative response, such as mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and peroxidase (POD) was not induced by UV-B. Drought stress in UV-B-treated plants induced mitochondrial Mn-SOD gene expression. Taken together, the UV-B treatment did not induce significant tolerance in plants towards drought stress under the conditions used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris, France: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Drought, Dualex, Flavonoids, Jalapeno pepper, Morphology, Ultraviolet-B radiation
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67300 (URN)10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.06.025 (DOI)000455692000010 ()29950274 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048888625 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942 - 2015-516Knowledge Foundation, 20130164
Note

Funding Agencies:

CONACYT  283259

Faculty for Business, Science and Technology at Örebro University

Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Jansen, M. A. K., Bilger, W., Hideg, É., Strid, Å. & Urban, O. (2019). Interactive effects of UV-B radiation in a complex environment. Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), 134, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactive effects of UV-B radiation in a complex environment
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2019 (English)In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 134, p. 1-8Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Masson, 2019
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69786 (URN)10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.10.021 (DOI)000455692000001 ()30385007 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055288326 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20130164Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-516
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Czégény, G., Körösi, L., Strid, Å. & Hideg, É. (2019). Multiple roles for Vitamin B6in plant acclimation to UV-B. Scientific Reports, 9(1), Article ID 1259.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple roles for Vitamin B6in plant acclimation to UV-B
2019 (Swedish)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Direct and indirect roles of vitamin B6in leaf acclimation to supplementary UV-B radiation are shown in vitamin B6deficient Arabidopsis thalianamutant rsr4-1 and C24 wild type. Responses to 4 days of 3.9 kJ m-2d-1 biologically effective UV-B dose were compared in terms of leaf photochemistry, vitamer content, and antioxidant enzyme activities; complemented with a comprehensive study of vitamer ROS scavenging capacities. Under UV-B, rsr4-1 leaves lost more (34%) photochemical yield than C24 plants (24%). In the absence of UV-B, rsr4-1 leaves contained markedly less pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP) than C24 ones, but levels increased up to the C24 contents in response to UV-B. Activities of class-III ascorbate and glutathione peroxidases increased in C24 leaves upon the UV-B treatment but not in the rsr4-1 mutant. SOD activities remained the same in C24 but decreased by more than 50% in rsr4-1 under UV-B. Although PLP was shown to be an excellent antioxidant in vitro, our results suggest that the UV-B protective role of B6 vitamers is realized indirectly, via supporting peroxidase defence rather than by direct ROS scavenging. We hypothesize that the two defence pathways are linked through the PLP-dependent biosynthesis of cystein and heme, affecting peroxidases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Botany
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70847 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-38053-w (DOI)000457616300148 ()30718682 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061031153 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-516Knowledge Foundation, 20130164
Note

Funding Agencies:

New National Excellence Program of the Ministry of Human Capacities  UNKP-17-3-III-PTE-229

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science and Technology  

Janos Bolyai Research Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences  

European Social Fund  EFOP-3.6.1.-16-2016-00004 

European Union 

Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Wu, M., Farkas, D., Eriksson, L. A. & Strid, Å. (2019). Proline 411 biases the conformation of the intrinsically disordered plant UVR8 photoreceptor C27 domain altering the functional properties of the peptide. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 818.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proline 411 biases the conformation of the intrinsically disordered plant UVR8 photoreceptor C27 domain altering the functional properties of the peptide
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

UVR8 (UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8) is a UV-B photoreceptor responsible for initiating UV-B signalling in plants. UVR8 is a homodimer in its signalling inactive form. Upon absorption of UV radiation, the protein monomerizes into its photoactivated state. In the monomeric form, UVR8 binds the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 (CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), triggering subsequent UV-B-dependent photomorphogenic development in plants. Recent in vivoexperiments have shown that the UVR8 C-terminal region (aa 397-423; UVR8C27) alone is sufficient to regulate the activity of COP1. In this work, CD spectroscopy and NMR experiments showed that the UVR8C27domain was non-structured but gained secondary structure at higher temperatures leading to increased order. Bias-exchange metadynamics simulations were also performed to evaluate the free energy landscape of UVR8C27. An inverted free energy landscape was revealed, with a disordered structure in the global energy minimum. Flanking the global energy minimum, more structured states were found at higher energies. Furthermore, stabilization of the low energy disordered state was attributed to a proline residue, P411, as evident from P411A mutant data. P411 is also a key residue in UVR8 binding to COP1. UVR8C27is therefore structurally competent to function as a molecular switch for interaction of UVR8 with different binding partners since at higher free energies different structural conformations are being induced in this peptide. P411 has a key role for this function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Physical Chemistry Theoretical Chemistry
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70355 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-37005-8 (DOI)000456826200047 ()30692548 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060606046 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilCarl Tryggers foundation
Note

Funding Agencies:

Faculty of Science at University of Gothenburg

Swedish NMR centre at the University of Gothenburg 

Sven and Lily Lawski foundation for Scientific Research

Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
O'Hara, A., Headland, L. R., Díaz-Ramos, L. A., Morales, L. O., Strid, Å. & Jenkins, G. I. (2019). Regulation of Arabidopsis gene expression by low fluence rate UV-B independently of UVR8 and stress signaling. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 18(7), 1675-1684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation of Arabidopsis gene expression by low fluence rate UV-B independently of UVR8 and stress signaling
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2019 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1675-1684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

UV-B exposure of plants regulates expression of numerous genes concerned with various responses. Sudden exposure of non-acclimated plants to high fluence rate, short wavelength UV-B induces expression via stress-related signaling pathways that are not specific to the UV-B stimulus, whereas low fluence rates of UV-B can regulate expression via the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8). However, there is little information about whether non-stressful, low fluence rate UV-B treatments can activate gene expression independently of UVR8. Here, transcriptomic analysis of wild-type and uvr8 mutant Arabidopsis exposed to low fluence rate UV-B showed that numerous genes were regulated independently of UVR8. Moreover, nearly all of these genes were distinct to those induced by stress treatments. A small number of genes were expressed at all UV-B fluence rates employed and may be concerned with activation of eustress responses that facilitate acclimation to changing conditions. Expression of the gene encoding the transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS NAC DOMAIN CONTAINING PROTEIN 13 (ANAC13) was studied to characterise a low fluence rate, UVR8-independent response. ANAC13 is induced by as little as 0.1 μmol m−2 s−1 UV-B and its regulation is independent of components of the canonical UVR8 signaling pathway COP1 and HY5/HYH. Furthermore, UV-B induced expression of ANAC13 is independent of the photoreceptors CRY1, CRY2, PHOT1 and PHOT2 and phytochromes A, B, D and E. ANAC13 expression is induced over a range of UV-B wavelengths at low doses, with maximum response at 310 nm. This study provides a basis for further investigation of UVR8 and stress independent, low fluence rate UV-B signaling pathway(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
RSC Publishing, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74760 (URN)10.1039/C9PP00151D (DOI)000477947100005 ()31218318 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068743324 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20130164Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-516
Note

Funding Agencies:

UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences research council PhD studentships at the University of Glasgow

Faculty for Business, Science, and Technology at Örebro University  

Strategic Young Researchers Recruitment Programme at Örebro University  

University of Glasgow 

Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Qian, M., Kalbina, I., Rosenqvist, E., Jansen, M. A. K., Teng, Y. & Strid, Å. (2019). UV regulates expression of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in an organ and spectrum dependent manner. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 18(2), 424-433
Open this publication in new window or tab >>UV regulates expression of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in an organ and spectrum dependent manner
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2019 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 424-433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Expression of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) genes encoding the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H), and chalcone synthase (CHS), was studied under control light conditions (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR) in root, stem, and leaf. Furthermore, expression was quantified in leaves illuminated with PAR and supplemental ultraviolet-A (315-400nm) or ultraviolet-B (280-315 nm) radiation. The expression pattern of all twelve CsPAL, threeCsC4H, and three CsCHS genes was established. Among the genes regulated by UV two general expression patterns emerge. One pattern applies to genes primarily regulated by enriched UV-A illumination (pattern 1). Another (pattern 2) was found for the genes regulated by enriched UV-B. Three of the pattern 2 genes (CsPAL4, CsPAL10, CsCHS2) displayed a particular sub-pattern (pattern 2b) with transcription enriched by at least 30 fold. In contrast to the other genes studied, the promoters of the genes regulated according to pattern 2b contained a combination of a number of cis-acting regulatory elements (MREs, ACEs, and G-boxes) that may be of importance for the particularly high enhancement of expression under UV-B- containing light. The regulation of phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthesis genes in cucumber resembles that of a number of other plants. However, cucumber, due to its greater size, is an attractive species for more detailed studies of the fine regulation of spatial and temporal expression of key genes. This in turn, can facilitate the quantitative investigation of the relationships between different promotor motifs, the expression levels of each of these three genes, and metabolite accumulation profiles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Botany
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70117 (URN)10.1039/C8PP00480C (DOI)000458569100015 ()30628617 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061384256 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-516Knowledge Foundation, 20130164The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT), CH2016-6788
Note

Funding Agencies:

Orebro University's Faculty for Business, Science and Technology  

Science Foundation Ireland  SFI 16-IA-4418 

National Natural Science Foundation of China  31711530027 

China Scholarship Council (CSC) 

Available from: 2018-11-11 Created: 2018-11-11 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Díaz-Ramos, L. A., O'Hara, A., Kanagarajan, S., Farkas, D., Strid, Å. & Jenkins, G. I. (2018). Difference in the action spectra for UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in Arabidopsis. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 17(8), 1108-1117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Difference in the action spectra for UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in Arabidopsis
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2018 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1108-1117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) activates photomorphogenic responses when plants are exposed to ultraviolet-B (UVB) light. However, whereas the absorption spectrum of UVR8 peaks at 280 nm, action spectra for several photomorphogenic UV-B responses show maximal photon effectiveness at 290-300 nm. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we measured the effectiveness of UV wavelengths in initiating two responses in Arabidopsis: photoconversion of homodimeric UVR8 into the monomeric form, which is active in signaling, and accumulation of transcripts of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) transcription factor, which has a key role in UVR8-mediated responses. When purified UVR8 or Arabidopsis leaf extracts were exposed to UV light monomerisation was maximal at approximately 280 nm, which correlates with the UVR8 absorption spectrum. When intact plants were exposed to UV, monomerisation was most strongly initiated at approximately 290 nm, and this shift in maximal effectiveness could be explained by strong absorption or reflectance at 280 nm by leaf tissue. Notably, the action spectrum for accumulation of HY5 transcripts in the same leaf tissue samples used to assay UVR8 dimer/monomer status peaked at approximately 300 nm. Possible reasons for the difference in maximal photon effectiveness of UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in leaf tissue are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Plant Biotechnology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67649 (URN)10.1039/C8PP00138C (DOI)000441153300013 ()29993086 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051272104 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20130164Swedish Research Council FormasCarl Tryggers foundation
Note

Funding Agencies:

Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT)  

UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council PhD studentship (University of Glasgow)  

Sven and Lily Lawski's Foundation for Scientific Research (University of Örebro) 

Faculty for Business, Science, and Technology at Örebro University

EU COST action 'UV4Growth'  FA0906 

University of Glasgow 

Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Hideg, É. & Strid, Å. (2017). The effects of UV-B on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants. In: Brian R. Jordan (Ed.), UV-B radiation and plant life: molecular biology to ecology (pp. 90-110). Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of UV-B on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants
2017 (English)In: UV-B radiation and plant life: molecular biology to ecology / [ed] Brian R. Jordan, Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing, 2017, p. 90-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on the effects of UV-B radiation on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants and their underlying mechanisms. Information on the UV-inducible metabolites and protection responses of plants against UV-B radiation are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing, 2017
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53555 (URN)10.1079/9781780648590.0090 (DOI)978-1-78064-859-0 (ISBN)978-1-78064-860-6 (ISBN)
Projects
UV4quality
Funder
Knowledge FoundationSwedish Research Council Formas
Note

This chapter is dedicated to Prof. Jan M Anderson (1932-2015) and to her lifetime achievements in photosynthesis and plant biology

Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Kalbina, I., Lagerqvist, N., Moiane, B., Ahlm, C., Andersson, S., Strid, Å. & Falk, K. I. (2016). Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oraladministration of the transgenic plants. Protein Expression and Purification, 127, 61-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oraladministration of the transgenic plants
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2016 (English)In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 127, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The zoonotic Rift Valley fever virus affects livestock and humans in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula.The economic impact of this pathogen due to livestock losses, as well as its relevance to public health,underscores the importance of developing effective and easily distributed vaccines. Vaccines that can bedelivered orally are of particular interest.

Here, we report the expression in transformed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) of Rift Valley fever virusantigens. The antigens used in this study were the N protein and a deletion mutant of the Gn glycoprotein.Transformed lines were analysed for specific mRNA and protein content by RT-PCR and Westernblotting, respectively. Furthermore, the plant-expressed antigens were evaluated for their immunogenicityin mice fed the transgenic plants. After oral intake of fresh transgenic plant material, a proportionof the mice elicited specific IgG antibody responses, as compared to the control animals that were fedwild-type plants and of which none sero-converted.

Thus, we show that transgenic plants can be readily used to express and produce Rift Valley Fever virusproteins, and that the plants are immunogenic when given orally to mice. These are promising findingsand provide a basis for further studies on edible plant vaccines against the Rift Valley fever virus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Diego, USA: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Antigen production, Arabidopsis thaliana, Rift valley fever virus, Plant vaccine, Transformation
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Immunology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Biochemistry; Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51367 (URN)10.1016/j.pep.2016.07.003 (DOI)000382181300009 ()27402440 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978634507 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Vaccinutveckling och vaccinproduktion
Funder
Knowledge FoundationStiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science and Technology

Sparbanksstiftelsen Nya

Available from: 2016-07-17 Created: 2016-07-17 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Petra, M., Marija, V., Czégény, G., Veljovic Jovanovic, S., Strid, Å. & Hideg, É. (2016). Evaluation of procedures for assessing anti- and pro-oxidants in plant samples. Analytical Methods, 8(28), 5569-5580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of procedures for assessing anti- and pro-oxidants in plant samples
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2016 (English)In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 8, no 28, p. 5569-5580Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plants as well as other aerobic organisms constantly produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). At regulatedlow concentrations ROS may serve as signal molecules, while in excessive amounts these may causeoxidative damage to biomolecules. Actual cellular concentrations are controlled by a network of variousantioxidants, and acclimation to stress conditions is achieved by a dynamic balance of ROS productionand neutralization. Accordingly, plant stress physiology studies generally include an array of methodstesting the occurrence of ROS as well as evaluating antioxidant capacities. The aim of the present workis to provide an overview of these methods, with special emphasis on avoiding errors that can possiblylead to either inaccurate data or misinterpretations of otherwise correct measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2016
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Food Science
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51368 (URN)10.1039/c6ay01342b (DOI)000379896600003 ()2-s2.0-84978732075 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Plant UV Photobiology
Note

Funding Agencies:

EU COST action FA0906 'UV4growth'

Ministry of Education and Science, Republic of Serbia III 43010

Hungarian Scientific Grant Agency OTKA NN-85349

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science, and Technology

Knowledge Foundation Sweden (project 'UV4quality')

FORMAS research council

Available from: 2016-07-17 Created: 2016-07-17 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3315-8835

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