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Strid, Åke, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3315-8835
Publications (10 of 82) Show all publications
Díaz-Ramos, L. A., O'Hara, A., Kanagarajan, S., Farkas, D., Strid, Å. & Jenkins, G. I. (2018). Difference in the action spectra for UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in Arabidopsis. Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, 17, 1108-1117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Difference in the action spectra for UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in Arabidopsis
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2018 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 17, p. 1108-1117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) activates photomorphogenic responses when plants are exposed to ultraviolet-B (UVB) light. However, whereas the absorption spectrum of UVR8 peaks at 280 nm, action spectra for several photomorphogenic UV-B responses show maximal photon effectiveness at 290-300 nm. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we measured the effectiveness of UV wavelengths in initiating two responses in Arabidopsis: photoconversion of homodimeric UVR8 into the monomeric form, which is active in signaling, and accumulation of transcripts of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) transcription factor, which has a key role in UVR8-mediated responses. When purified UVR8 or Arabidopsis leaf extracts were exposed to UV light monomerisation was maximal at approximately 280 nm, which correlates with the UVR8 absorption spectrum. When intact plants were exposed to UV, monomerisation was most strongly initiated at approximately 290 nm, and this shift in maximal effectiveness could be explained by strong absorption or reflectance at 280 nm by leaf tissue. Notably, the action spectrum for accumulation of HY5 transcripts in the same leaf tissue samples used to assay UVR8 dimer/monomer status peaked at approximately 300 nm. Possible reasons for the difference in maximal photon effectiveness of UVR8 monomerisation and HY5 transcript accumulation in leaf tissue are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Plant Biotechnology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67649 (URN)10.1039/C8PP00138C (DOI)
Funder
Knowledge FoundationSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez-Calzada, T., Qian, M., Strid, Å., Neugart, S., Schreiner, M., Torres-Pacheco, I. & Guevara-Gonzales, R. (2018). Effect of UV-B radiation on morphology, phenolic compound production, gene expression, and subsequent drought stress responses in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of UV-B radiation on morphology, phenolic compound production, gene expression, and subsequent drought stress responses in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)
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2018 (English)In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

It has been suggested that accumulation of flavonoids could be a key step in development of plant tolerance to different environmental stresses. Moreover, it has been recognized that abiotic stresses such as drought and UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) induce phenolic compound accumulation, suggesting a role for these compounds in drought tolerance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of UV-B exposure on chili pepper (Capsicum annuum, cv. ‘Coronel’) plant performance, phenolic compound production, and gene expression associated with response to subsequent drought stress. Additionally, the phenotypic response to drought stress of these plants was studied. UV-B induced a reduction both in stem length, stem dry weight and number of floral primordia. The largest reduction in these variables was observed when combining UV-B and drought. UV-B-treated well-watered plants displayed fructification approximately 1 week earlier than non-UV-B-treated controls. Flavonoids measured epidermally in leaves significantly increased during UV-B treatment. Specifically, UV-B radiation significantly increased chlorogenic acid and apigenin 8-C-hexoside levels in leaves and a synergistic increase of luteolin 6-C-pentoside-8-C-hexoside was obtained by UV-B and subsequent drought stress. Gene expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes also increased during UV-B treatments. On the other hand, expression of genes related to an oxidative response, such as mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and peroxidase (POD) was not induced by UV-B. Drought stress in UV-B-treated plants induced mitochondrial Mn-SOD gene expression. Taken together, the UV-B treatment did not induce significant tolerance in plants towards drought stress under the conditions used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67300 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasKnowledge Foundation
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Hideg, É. & Strid, Å. (2017). The effects of UV-B on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants. In: Brian R. Jordan (Ed.), UV-B radiation and plant life: molecular biology to ecology (pp. 90-110). Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of UV-B on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants
2017 (English)In: UV-B radiation and plant life: molecular biology to ecology / [ed] Brian R. Jordan, Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing, 2017, p. 90-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on the effects of UV-B radiation on the biochemistry and metabolism of plants and their underlying mechanisms. Information on the UV-inducible metabolites and protection responses of plants against UV-B radiation are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing, 2017
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53555 (URN)10.1079/9781780648590.0090 (DOI)978-1-78064-859-0 (ISBN)978-1-78064-860-6 (ISBN)
Projects
UV4quality
Funder
Knowledge FoundationSwedish Research Council Formas
Note

This chapter is dedicated to Prof. Jan M Anderson (1932-2015) and to her lifetime achievements in photosynthesis and plant biology

Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Kalbina, I., Lagerqvist, N., Moiane, B., Ahlm, C., Andersson, S., Strid, Å. & Falk, K. I. (2016). Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oraladministration of the transgenic plants. Protein Expression and Purification, 127, 61-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oraladministration of the transgenic plants
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2016 (English)In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 127, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The zoonotic Rift Valley fever virus affects livestock and humans in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula.The economic impact of this pathogen due to livestock losses, as well as its relevance to public health,underscores the importance of developing effective and easily distributed vaccines. Vaccines that can bedelivered orally are of particular interest.

Here, we report the expression in transformed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) of Rift Valley fever virusantigens. The antigens used in this study were the N protein and a deletion mutant of the Gn glycoprotein.Transformed lines were analysed for specific mRNA and protein content by RT-PCR and Westernblotting, respectively. Furthermore, the plant-expressed antigens were evaluated for their immunogenicityin mice fed the transgenic plants. After oral intake of fresh transgenic plant material, a proportionof the mice elicited specific IgG antibody responses, as compared to the control animals that were fedwild-type plants and of which none sero-converted.

Thus, we show that transgenic plants can be readily used to express and produce Rift Valley Fever virusproteins, and that the plants are immunogenic when given orally to mice. These are promising findingsand provide a basis for further studies on edible plant vaccines against the Rift Valley fever virus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Diego, USA: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Antigen production, Arabidopsis thaliana, Rift valley fever virus, Plant vaccine, Transformation
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Immunology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Biochemistry; Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51367 (URN)10.1016/j.pep.2016.07.003 (DOI)000382181300009 ()27402440 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978634507 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Vaccinutveckling och vaccinproduktion
Funder
Knowledge FoundationStiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science and Technology

Sparbanksstiftelsen Nya

Available from: 2016-07-17 Created: 2016-07-17 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Petra, M., Marija, V., Czégény, G., Veljovic Jovanovic, S., Strid, Å. & Hideg, É. (2016). Evaluation of procedures for assessing anti- and pro-oxidants in plant samples. Analytical Methods, 8(28), 5569-5580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of procedures for assessing anti- and pro-oxidants in plant samples
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2016 (English)In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 8, no 28, p. 5569-5580Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plants as well as other aerobic organisms constantly produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). At regulatedlow concentrations ROS may serve as signal molecules, while in excessive amounts these may causeoxidative damage to biomolecules. Actual cellular concentrations are controlled by a network of variousantioxidants, and acclimation to stress conditions is achieved by a dynamic balance of ROS productionand neutralization. Accordingly, plant stress physiology studies generally include an array of methodstesting the occurrence of ROS as well as evaluating antioxidant capacities. The aim of the present workis to provide an overview of these methods, with special emphasis on avoiding errors that can possiblylead to either inaccurate data or misinterpretations of otherwise correct measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2016
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Food Science
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51368 (URN)10.1039/c6ay01342b (DOI)000379896600003 ()2-s2.0-84978732075 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Plant UV Photobiology
Note

Funding Agencies:

EU COST action FA0906 'UV4growth'

Ministry of Education and Science, Republic of Serbia III 43010

Hungarian Scientific Grant Agency OTKA NN-85349

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science, and Technology

Knowledge Foundation Sweden (project 'UV4quality')

FORMAS research council

Available from: 2016-07-17 Created: 2016-07-17 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hansson, C., Schön, K., Kalbina, I., Strid, Å., Andersson, S., Bokarewa, M. I. & Lycke, N. Y. (2016). Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis. Plant Biotechnology Journal, 14(4), 1106-1115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis
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2016 (English)In: Plant Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1467-7644, E-ISSN 1467-7652, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1106-1115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although much explored, oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases still awaits the establishment of novel and effective vectors. We investigated if the tolerogenic CTA1(R7K)-COL-DD fusion protein can be expressed in edible plants and in this way induce oral tolerance and protect against arthritis. The fusion protein was recombinantly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, which were fed to H-2q restricted DBA/1 mice to assess the preventive effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The treatment resulted in fewer mice exhibiting disease and arthritis scores were significantly reduced. Immune suppression was evident in treated mice and serum biomarkers for inflammation as well as anti-collagen IgG responses were reduced. In spleen draining and lymph nodes, CD4+ T cell responses were reduced. Concomitant with a reduced effector T cell activity with lower IFNg, IL-13 and IL-17A production we observed an increase in IL-10 production to recall antigen stimulation in vitro, suggesting reduced Th1, Th2 and Th17 activity subsequent to upregulated IL-10 and regulatory T cell (Treg) functions. The present study shows that edible plants expressing a tolerogen were effective at stimulating CD4 T cell tolerance and in protecting against CIA disease. Our study conveys optimism as to the potential of using edible plants for oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
autoimmunity; transgenic plants; edible plants; CIA; IL-10; FoxP3
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Plant Biotechnology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; Immunology; Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45625 (URN)10.1111/pbi.12479 (DOI)000373069400006 ()26403330 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961215734 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationAFA InsuranceEU, FP7, Seventh Framework ProgrammeSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Note

Funding Agency:

UNISEC

Available from: 2015-08-22 Created: 2015-08-22 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Hadad, R., Marks, E., Kalbina, I., Schön, K., Unemo, M., Lycke, N., . . . Andersson, S. (2016). Protection against genital tract Chlamydia trachomatis infection following intranasal immunization with a novel recombinant MOMP VS2/4 antigen. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 124, 1078-1086
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protection against genital tract Chlamydia trachomatis infection following intranasal immunization with a novel recombinant MOMP VS2/4 antigen
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2016 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, p. 1078-1086Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The asymptomatic nature of most Chlamydia trachomatis infections and the lack of appropriate effects by current prevention and management call for vaccine development. We evaluated a recombinant subunit vaccine candidate based on the major outer membrane protein variable segments 2 and 4 (MOMP VS2/4). To achieve maximal immunogenicity and ease of production and purification, MOMP VS2/4 was constructed by using highly immunogenic sequences of MOMP only, thereby minimizing the presence of hydrophobic regions, and spacing the immunogenic epitopes with a flexible amino acid sequence. A purification tag was also added. The MOMP VS2/4 was given intranasally, with or without intravaginal boost, with cholera toxin (CT) adjuvant to C57BL/6 mice, which were screened for immunogenicity and protection against a live challenge infection with C. trachomatis serovar D. Bacterial shedding, cell-mediated responses, and antibody responses were monitored. Immunized mice exhibited significantly less bacterial shedding and were better protected against infertility as compared to unimmunized control mice. Immunizations stimulated both systemic and local specific antibody (IgG1, IgG2c, and IgA) responses, and primed T cells that produced interferon-c and interleukins 13 and 17 upon challenge with recall antigen. Thus, MOMP VS2/4, in combination with CT adjuvant, stimulated Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector cells, and generated protective immunity associated with less pathology. We regard MOMP VS2/4 as a promising candidate for further development into a mucosal chlamydial vaccine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, vaccine, major outer membrane protein, mice, antibody response, T cells
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Biochemistry; Immunology; Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53554 (URN)10.1111/apm.12605 (DOI)000388265700008 ()27859689 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995753108 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Utveckling av vacciner mot sexuellt överförbara sjukdomarMolecular farming
Funder
Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Sparbanksstiftelsen Nya

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science, and Technology

Foundation for Medical Research at Örebro University Hospital

Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Jordan, B. R., Strid, Å. & Wargent, J. J. (2016). What role does UVB play in determining photosynthesis? (3ed.). In: Mohammad Pessarakli (Ed.), Handbook of Photosynthesis: (pp. 275-286). Boca Raton: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What role does UVB play in determining photosynthesis?
2016 (English)In: Handbook of Photosynthesis / [ed] Mohammad Pessarakli, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2016, 3, p. 275-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2016 Edition: 3
National Category
Other Agricultural Sciences Botany
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39416 (URN)9781482230734 (ISBN)
Projects
Plant UV Photobiology
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-08 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Morales, L. O., Brosché, M., Vainonen, J. P., Sipari, N., Lindfors, A., Strid, Å. & Aphalo, P. J. (2015). Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?. Plant, Cell and Environment, 38(5), 878-891
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?
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2015 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 878-891Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315nm) and UV-A (315-400nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight.

Keywords
Flavonoids; RCD1; Signalling; Solar UV; Stress; UV acclimation
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34535 (URN)10.1111/pce.12341 (DOI)000353898400004 ()24689869 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84927723426 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Academy of Finland 116775 135751 140981

Finnish Cultural Foundation

LignoCell - TEKES

LignoCell - Academy of Finland

Available from: 2014-04-01 Created: 2014-04-01 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Czégény, G., Wu, M., Dér, A., Eriksson, L. A., Strid, Å. & Hideg, É. (2014). Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the ultraviolet-B (280-315 nm) induced oxidative stress of plant leaves through multiple pathways. FEBS Letters, 588(14), 2255-2261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the ultraviolet-B (280-315 nm) induced oxidative stress of plant leaves through multiple pathways
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2014 (English)In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 588, no 14, p. 2255-2261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Solar UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation is a developmental signal in plants but may also cause oxidative stress when combined with other environmental factors. Using computer modelling and in solution experiments we show that UV-B is capable of photosensitizing hydroxyl radical production from hydrogen peroxide. We present evidence that the oxidative effect of UV-B in leaves is at least two-fold: (i) it increases cellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations, to a larger extent in pyridoxine antioxidant mutant pdx1.3-1 Arabidopsis and (ii) is capable of a partial photo-conversion of both ‘natural’ and ‘extra’ hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radicals. As stress conditions other than UV can increase cellular hydrogen peroxide levels, synergistic deleterious effects of various stresses may be expected already under ambient solar UV-B.

Keywords
Arabidopsis; Computer modeling; Hydrogen peroxide; Hydroxyl radical; Leaf; Oxygen radicals; Photosynthesis; Plant; Terephthalic acid; UV photobiology
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34932 (URN)10.1016/j.febslet.2014.05.005 (DOI)000338401100011 ()24846142 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902662550 (Scopus ID)
Projects
UV Plant Photobiology
Funder
Knowledge FoundationCarl Tryggers foundation
Note

Funding Agencies:

COST Action FA0906

Hungarian Scientific Grant Agency OTKMNN-85349

Örebro University's Faculty for Business, Science and Technology

Available from: 2014-05-03 Created: 2014-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3315-8835

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