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Bayram Özdemir, S., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2019). Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors. Child Development, 90(3), 808-824
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Harassment and Immigrant Youth's Engagement in Violent Behaviors: Understanding the Risk Factors
2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 808-824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine whether ethnic harassment was related to violent behaviors among immigrant youth over time and to identify the risk factors. The sample comprised immigrant adolescents living in Sweden (N = 365; Mage  = 13.93, SD = 0.80). Results showed that the more youth were ethnically harassed, the more they engaged in violent acts over time. A separated identity significantly moderated the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's engagement in violent behaviors. Specifically, ethnic harassment positively predicted engagement in violent behaviors only at high levels of separated identity. Impulsivity and school ethnic composition did not act as moderators. The findings suggest that preventing violent behaviors among immigrant youth requires a focus on promoting positive interethnic relationships, and multicultural identity among immigrant youth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62425 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12975 (DOI)000477640100016 ()29023668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031109803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Giannotta, F., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2019). The Implementation Integrity of Parenting Programs: Which Aspects Are Most Important?. Child and Youth Care Forum, 48(6), 917-933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Implementation Integrity of Parenting Programs: Which Aspects Are Most Important?
2019 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 917-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The implementation of preventive interventions is considered a crucial aspect of their success. However, few studies have investigated which components of implementation are most important.

Objective: We aimed to understand whether the components of implementation integrity—adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participants’ involvement—influenced the effectiveness of four parenting programs. We also investigated factors associated with these components.

Method: Data come from a national evaluation of parenting programs in Sweden. The study was a randomised controlled effectiveness trial, with a sample of 535 parents with 3–12-year-old children. Measures included parenting behaviors (angry outbursts, harsh parenting, attempts to understand, rewarding, and praising), child conduct problems (ECBI and SNAP-V), and measures tapping into the four components (adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participant involvement).

Results: We ran multilevel models and found that implementation quality (adherence and quality of delivery) did not influence the effects on parents and children. Conversely, participant involvement was associated with improvements in parenting and child conduct. Finally, parents’ perceptions of their leaders as supportive and understanding were associated with parents’ responsiveness and attendance.

Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of having actively engaged parents to maximise intervention effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Parenting programs Implementation quality Adherence Quality of delivery Dose
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77430 (URN)10.1007/s10566-019-09514-8 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Özdemir, M. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2019). Why Do Some Immigrant Adolescents Do Well in School Whereas Others Fail?: Current State of Knowledge and Directions for Future Research. In: Güngör, D. & Strohmeier, D. (Ed.), Contextualizing Immigrant Resilience: Cultural and Acculturation Perspectives. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Do Some Immigrant Adolescents Do Well in School Whereas Others Fail?: Current State of Knowledge and Directions for Future Research
2019 (English)In: Contextualizing Immigrant Resilience: Cultural and Acculturation Perspectives / [ed] Güngör, D. & Strohmeier, D., Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75881 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-08-26
Bayram Özdemir, S., Sun, S., Korol, L., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2018). Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47(6), 1151-1163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1151-1163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Social Work Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64044 (URN)10.1007/s10964-017-0795-0 (DOI)000431400400002 ()29294224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85039864223 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 201500282
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-09-16Bibliographically approved
Jaf, D., Skoog, T. & Özdemir, M. (2017). Does parenting behavior influence youth’s participation in organized sports activities?. In: 6th ENSEC Conference: Programme & Information. Paper presented at 6th European Networks For Social And Emotional Competence Conference (ENSEC 2017), Stockholm, Sweden, June 7-9, 2017 (pp. 69-69).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does parenting behavior influence youth’s participation in organized sports activities?
2017 (English)In: 6th ENSEC Conference: Programme & Information, 2017, p. 69-69Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Participation in organized sports activities is linked with positive developmental outcomes for youth. However, the literature consistently shows that immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports compared to their native counterparts. Thus, they are at risk for missing of the positive benefits of sports. The aim of this study was to investigate why immigrant youth are less likely to participate in organized sports activities compared to their native counterparts. The data come from self-reports from 679 students in 7th grade. Immigrant youth were less likely (57%) to participate in organized sports activities compared to native youth (73%). Further, parents’ engagement in sports and fathers’ employment status significantly predict Nordic youths’ sports involvement (p < .05). For immigrant youth, only fathers’ employment status did (p < .05). These finding support Eccles’ expectancy-value model, which states that parents as role-models can influence youths’ participation in organized sports activities. However, this seems to only be the case for native youth.

Additional analysis will be run in order to find out other predictors that might explain the low rates of sports involvement of immigrant youth. The findings will supplement the scarce literature on immigrant youths’ low engagement in organized sports activities.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72341 (URN)
Conference
6th European Networks For Social And Emotional Competence Conference (ENSEC 2017), Stockholm, Sweden, June 7-9, 2017
Note

The title of the presentation in "6th ENSEC Conference. Programme & Information" is "The association between parental physical activity and youth sports participation. Differences and similarities between immigrant and Swedish youth".

Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Özdemir, M. & Bayram Özdemir, S. (2017). The Role of School Context in Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants and Inter-ethnic Friendships. In: Erik Lundberg (Ed.), The Mechanisms of Tolerance: An anthology: . Stockholm: The Living History Forum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of School Context in Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants and Inter-ethnic Friendships
2017 (English)In: The Mechanisms of Tolerance: An anthology / [ed] Erik Lundberg, Stockholm: The Living History Forum , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: The Living History Forum, 2017
Keywords
Inter-ethnic attitudes, inter-ethnic relations, immigrants, school context, teacher
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55962 (URN)978-91-86261-63-4 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

This study was made possible by access to data from the Political Socialization Program, a longitudinal research program at Youth & Society (YeS) at Örebro University, Sweden. Responsible for the planning, implementation, and financing of the collection of data were professors Erik Amnå, Mats Ekström, Margaret Kerr and Håkan Stattin. The data collection was supported by grants from Riksbankens Jubileumsfond. 

Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2018-02-01Bibliographically approved
Högström, J., Olofsson, V., Özdemir, M., Enebrink, P. & Stattin, H. (2017). Two-Year Findings from a National Effectiveness Trial: Effectiveness of Behavioral and Non-Behavioral Parenting Programs. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 45(3), 527-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-Year Findings from a National Effectiveness Trial: Effectiveness of Behavioral and Non-Behavioral Parenting Programs
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 527-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Long-term follow-up studies of selective parent training (PT) programs are scarce, particularly in the case of effectiveness trials conducted within regular care settings. This study evaluated the 2-year effects of 4 programs: Comet, Incredible Years, Cope, and Connect and differences in the rate of change among programs were investigated using Latent Growth Modeling (LGM). Participants were parents who had sought help at 30 local service sector units (e.g., child psychiatric clinics and social services centers) for major problems in managing their children's externalizing behavior. Parents of 749 children (63 % boys) with moderate levels of externalizing behavior, aged 3-12, were randomized to one of the 4 PT programs. Assessments included parent-reported measures of child externalizing, hyperactivity and inattention, as well as parenting practices, sense of competence, and parents' stress and depressive symptoms. At 2-year follow-up, there were no differences in any of the child outcomes among the programs. All programs had reduced externalizing behaviors with large effect sizes (d = 1.21 to d = 1.32), and negative parenting practices with moderate to large effect sizes (d = 0.49 to d = 0.83). LGM analyses showed that the 2 behavioral programs, Comet and Incredible Years, produced more rapid reductions in externalizing behavior during the course of the intervention than the non-behavioral program, Connect. Connect, however, was the only program where children continued to improve after the intervention. Overall, the results indicate that the 4 programs were equally effective in a clinical setting, despite differences in their theoretical origin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Parent training programs, externalizing behavior, long-termfollow-up, effectiveness, randomized controlled trial
National Category
Pedagogy Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51071 (URN)10.1007/s10802-016-0178-0 (DOI)000398575100010 ()27334706 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84975507547 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, 01-12,042/2008
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H., Hussein, O., Özdemir, M. & Russo, S. (2017). Why do some adolescents encounter everyday events that increase their civic interest whereas others do not?. Developmental Psychology, 53(2), 306-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why do some adolescents encounter everyday events that increase their civic interest whereas others do not?
2017 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 306-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using a longitudinal design, we asked 2 age cohorts of adolescents (15- and 18-year-olds) whether they, during the last year, had experienced events that had increased their civic interest and about details of their experiences. Based on self-determination theory, we predicted that the adolescents who reported having experienced events of this kind had already been more interested and had had more positive feelings about politics much earlier in time, and that this original interest would have increased more over time, than that of other adolescents. Second, we proposed that the adolescents who had encountered events that triggered their civic interest would have been engaged in behaviors that reflected their needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence, much earlier in time, and that, over time, they would have increased these behaviors more than other adolescents. These 2 predictions were largely confirmed. As for the content of the events the adolescents reported, many of them concerned national and international issues experienced as threatening, and that challenged the adolescents' beliefs and morality. Overall, a previous interest in politics and engagement in exploratory behaviors that reflect the adolescents' psychological needs seem to play crucial roles in understanding why adolescents in their everyday life encounter events that trigger their civic interest. Further, the findings show that having had everyday experiences that trigger the adolescents' civic interests are associated with a later increase in political interest more broadly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, USA: American Psychological Association (APA), 2017
Keywords
political interest; political agency; adolescents; self-determination theory; longitudinal research
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54218 (URN)10.1037/dev0000192 (DOI)000395789200009 ()27505698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007241871 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-02 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Özdemir, M. & Koutakis, N. (2016). Does promoting parents' negative attitudes to underage drinking reduce adolescents' drinking?: the mediating process and moderators of the effects of the Örebro prevention programme. Addiction, 111(2), 263-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does promoting parents' negative attitudes to underage drinking reduce adolescents' drinking?: the mediating process and moderators of the effects of the Örebro prevention programme
2016 (English)In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: The Örebro Prevention Programme (ÖPP) was found previously to be effective in reducing drunkenness among adolescents [Cohen's d = 0.35, number needed to treat (NNT) = 7.7]. The current study tested the mediating role of parents’ restrictive attitudes to underage drinking in explaining the effectiveness of the ÖPP, and the potential moderating role of gender, immigration status, peers’ and parents’ drinking and parent–adolescent relationship quality.

Design: A quasi‐experimental matched‐control group study with assessments at baseline, and at 18‐ and 30‐month follow‐ups.

Participants: Of the 895 target youths at ages 12–13 years, 811 youths and 651 parents at baseline, 653 youths and 524 parents at 18‐month and 705 youths and 506 parents at 30‐month follow‐up participated in the study.

Measurements: Youths reported on their past month drunkenness, their parents’ and peers’ alcohol use and the quality of their relationship with parents. Parents reported on their attitudes to underage drinking.

Findings: The mediation analyses, using latent growth curve modeling, showed that changes in parents’ restrictive attitudes to underage drinking explained the impact of the ÖPP on changes in youth drunkenness, which was reduced, and onset of monthly drunkenness, which was delayed, relative to controls. Mediation effect explained 57 and 45% of the effects on drunkenness and onset of monthly drunkenness, respectively. The programme effects on both parents’ attitudes and youth drunkenness were similar across gender, immigrant status, parents’ and peers’ alcohol use and parent–youth relationship quality.

Conclusions: Increasing parents’ restrictive attitudes to youth drinking appears to be an effective and robust strategy for reducing heavy underage drinking regardless of the adolescents’ gender, cultural origin, peers’ and parents’ drinking and relationship quality with parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Adolescents, heavy drinking, mediation, moderation, parental attitudes, prevention, No terms assigned
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46654 (URN)10.1111/add.13177 (DOI)000368940500010 ()26381442 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84954398317 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Bayram Özdemir, S., Özdemir, M. & Stattin, H. (2016). What makes youth harass their immigrant peers?: understanding the risk factors. Journal of Early Adolescence, 36(5), 601-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What makes youth harass their immigrant peers?: understanding the risk factors
2016 (English)In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 601-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

mmigrant youth are at risk of experiencing harassment in school; however, we have only limited understanding of what makes youth harass their peers on ground of their ethnic origin. To address this major limitation, we examined (a) whether youth’s negative attitudes toward immigrants impact their engagement in ethnic harassment over time and (b) whether youth’s impulsivity, their tendencies to engage in risky behaviors, and a chaotic surrounding school environment moderate the link between their negative attitudes toward immigrants and their involvement in ethnic harassment. The sample included 583 Swedish youth (Xage = 13.93, SD = .71). Youth with negative attitudes toward immigrants ethnically were found to harass their immigrant peers when they had high levels of impulsivity and violent tendencies. Contrary to our expectation, youth perceptions of school atmosphere did not act as a moderator. The present study highlights the importance of identifying risk factors to reach a comprehensive understanding of ethnic harassment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
ethnic harassment, impulsivity, violence, school atmosphere, and immigrant youth
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42328 (URN)10.1177/0272431615574887 (DOI)000375707900001 ()2-s2.0-84965110091 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-02 Created: 2015-02-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7009-5955

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