oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Scander, H., Neuman, N., Tellström, R. & Yngve, A. (2020). Acquiring competence: Sommeliers on ‘good’ food and beverage combinations. International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, 20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acquiring competence: Sommeliers on ‘good’ food and beverage combinations
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, ISSN 1878-450X, E-ISSN 1878-4518, Vol. 20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Research on food and beverage combinations is dominated by the sensory sciences, where sensory taste is seen as objective and quantifiable. Knowing which beverages and foods to serve together to attain optimal sensory quality is a core competence of sommeliers. Still, little is known about how this competence is actually acquired. Furthermore, scholars of cultural sociology suggest that cultural aspects of taste as “good” or “bad” are products of social processes, rather than objective characteristics.

This paper explores the development of professional competence of food and beverage combinations, by focusing on sommeliers in Sweden. The study is based on qualitative focus group interviews of sommeliers (n = 21) in Sweden, with different levels and types of work experience.

A thematic analysis of the data demonstrated that sommeliers talk about “good” combinations as a matter of delicate and refined taste, acquired through long-term practical engagement with wine and food. Foods deemed “unrefined” were expressed as becoming legitimate as cultural capital when combined with the right beverage, for example by revaluating “lowbrow” food when combining it with wine. Competence and taste were also expressed as being acquired through relationships with important people – a network of actors who open doors to legitimate competence. In theoretical terms: social capital is converted into cultural capital – a resource of value in their everyday engagement with customers. The agency of the individual sommelier was also found to be important, as socialisation into the sommelier profession also requires sociability, creativity and a will to experiment and try new and sometimes odd combinations.

This paper contributes to the understanding of sensory and sociocultural taste, as well as the development of sommeliers’ social and cultural capital while performing their profession.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Competence, Food, Gastronomy, Taste, Sommelier, Wine
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-80239 (URN)10.1016/j.ijgfs.2020.100199 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
Scander, H. (2019). Food and beverage combinations: Sommeliers' perspectives and consumer patterns in Sweden. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and beverage combinations: Sommeliers' perspectives and consumer patterns in Sweden
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As beverage intake can play an important part of choosing a healthy diet, it is important to increase awareness of the contribution of beverages to overall energy intake for consumers.

The professional sommelier has for a long time served as a cultural intermediary, providing guests with good food and beverage combinations. Here, a clear gap was identified between health and the current practice of sommellerie.

The aim of the thesis is to develop knowledge about food and beverage combinations by investigating the consumption patterns of a Swedish population. The thesis will also explore the sociocultural understanding of taste and the practices of professional sommeliers.

The understanding of energy contribution and beverage patterns were linked to health, which led to the suggestion that sommeliers should gain from nutritional knowledge – in particular focused on beverage. Furthermore, sommeliers talk about ‘good’ combinations as a matter of refined taste, acquired through long-term practical engagement with wine and food. Foods expressed as ‘unrefined’, could also be becoming legitimate as cultural capital when combined with the right beverage. Also, performing food and beverage combinations was a routinised activity surrounded by rules, competence and materiality and was driven by the will to satisfy guests. It was also a part of shaping of sommeliers’ identity through a continuous striving for improved competence.

Altogether, nutritional knowledge, acquisition of taste, goods reevaluation and legitimacy as well as identity shaping gives sommeliers an extended knowledge when combining food and beverage, providing guests with not only the desired taste but also the possibility of serving healthier combinations. This extends the range of workplaces for sommeliers in the restaurant industry, but also to elderly care, hospitals and the like, as all people in those environments should have the opportunity to enjoy good meals according to both taste and health considerations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2019. p. 105
Series
Örebro Studies in Culinary Arts and Meal Science, ISSN 1652-2974 ; 14
Keywords
Bourdieu, craft drinks, food pairing, meal, restaurant, riksmaten, sommelier, practice theory
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74611 (URN)978-91-7529-293-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-09-20, Örebro universitet, Campus Grythyttan, Gastronomiska teatern, Sörälgsvägen 2, Grythyttan, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Scander, H., Neuman, N. & Tellström, R. (2019). Sommeliers' Food and Beverage Combinations: Social Conventions and Professional Identity. Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, 4(1), 29-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sommeliers' Food and Beverage Combinations: Social Conventions and Professional Identity
2019 (English)In: Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, ISSN 2169-2971, E-ISSN 2169-298X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on food and beverage combinations has mainly concentrated on sensory evaluation of product characteristics or customer preferences, and there is limited research on professional prac-tices related to food and beverage combinations. In this study, in-depth focus group interviews were conducted with 21 Swedish sommeliers with different work experiences. The aim was to explore how professional sommeliers perform food and beverage combinations as a social practice. The qualitative content analysis resulted in two categories: conventions of combining and the sommelier identity. It was shown that performing food and beverage combinations was a routinized activity surrounded by rules, competence, and materiality and was driven by the will to satisfy guests and benefit emotionally and economically. It was also described as being a part of shaping sommeliers’ professional identities through a continuous striving for improved competence. These findings con-tribute to the literature on food and beverage combinations, bridging the gap between objective taste and individual subjectivity, have practical relevance for the hospitality industry, since they indicate norms of behavior and individual driving forces in one of its professions. This also helps educators in the industry to challenge traditional ways of teaching combinations in culinary arts. Moreover, as identity works as a driver for sommeliers in their professional development, this also presents ideas about how to improve staff retention in the restaurant business by building professional identities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019
Keywords
Food pairing, Sommelier, Theories of practice, Restaurant
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77403 (URN)10.3727/216929719X15657857907770 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Scander, H., Monteagudo, C., Nilsen, B. B., Tellström, R. & Yngve, A. (2018). Beverage consumption patterns and energy contribution from beverages per meal type: results from a national dietary survey in Sweden. Public Health Nutrition, 21(18), 3318-3327
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beverage consumption patterns and energy contribution from beverages per meal type: results from a national dietary survey in Sweden
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 21, no 18, p. 3318-3327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Many studies of food intake have been performed and published in Sweden, but to our knowledge no studies have extensively explored the beverage consumption of the Swedish adult population. The present study aimed to describe the beverage consumption and the contribution of beverage energy (including alcohol energy) to total energy intake according to gender, region of living, meal type and day for a Swedish adult population.

Design: National dietary survey Riksmaten (2010–2011), collected by the Swedish National Food Agency.

Setting: Sweden.

Subjects: A total of 1682 participants (57 % women) reported dietary intake data during four consecutive days, specified by portion size, meal, time point, day of the week and venue. Meals were categorized as breakfast, lunch, dinner and ‘other’.

Result: The beverage reported to be consumed the most was water (ml/d), followed by coffee. Men had a higher consumption of juice, soft drinks, beer, spirits and low-alcohol beer, while the consumption of tea and water was higher for women. For both genders, milk contributed the most to beverage energy intake. Energy percentage from beverages was higher at lunch and dinner during weekends for both genders. Participants from the biggest cities in Sweden had a higher consumption of wine for both genders and tea for men than participants from other regions.

Conclusions: A considerable part of total energy intake was contributed by beverages, especially for men. Beverages can contribute to a more enjoyable diet, but at the same time provide energy, sugar and alcohol in amounts that do not promote optimal health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Beverage consumption, Food habits, National dietary surveys, Weekday weekend, Adults, Alcoholic intake, Riksmaten
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69439 (URN)10.1017/S1368980018002537 (DOI)000454696300004 ()30295227 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055257210 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University 

Available from: 2018-10-09 Created: 2018-10-09 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Scander, H., Monteagudo, C., Nilsen, B. B., Tellström, R. & Yngve, A. (2018). Food and beverage dinner combinations, patterns among Swedish adults. International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, 14, 20-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and beverage dinner combinations, patterns among Swedish adults
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, ISSN 1878-450X, E-ISSN 1878-4518, Vol. 14, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Since the taste preferences of food and beverage combinations are considered subjective properties and have been studied in several different ways, mainly within the field of sensory science, this study contributes to the field of food and beverage combination studies by using self-reported eating habits.

Objective: This article explores the relationships between food and beverage combinations, recorded by a Swedish adult population.

Method: Analyses were made using data from the national dietary survey, Riksmaten (2010–2011), performed by the Swedish National Food Agency. A total of 1753 Swedish adults (53% women) aged 18–80 contributed dietary intake data during four consecutive days. All dinner choices were categorized into beverage categories and food categories. Combinations between beverage and food categories were analyzed by using cross tabulation. Correlation coefficients for non-parametric variables were used to determine the association power. Predictive factors for more important beverage and food combinations were explored by logistic regression analysis.

Results: Water was the most frequent choice in combination with all food categories. The results also showed that alcoholic beverages are present in two of the three strongest food and beverage correlations, the spirits drinks and white wine. The most important predictive factors were where the dinner took place for non-alcoholic combinations (OR: 4.33; 95% CI: 2.28–8.21) and age and employment for alcoholic combinations (OR > 2; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our results show correlations in reported consumption of food and beverage, which explain the occurrences of specific patterns of combinations of food and beverage. More studies on choice of beverage are needed to describe the patterns of intake, in order to understand the mechanisms behind beverage choice, in different settings, cultural situations and lifestyle backgrounds. Combinations in everyday life are described here and these are not always so sophisticated, rather building on availability than on optimal taste combinations. Our findings can offer an understanding of some common every-day choices to culinary professionals, useful for their guidance of food and beverage pairing, to enhance restaurant experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Drink, Consumption, Wine pairing, Commensality, Food habits, National dietary surveys, Alcohol intake, Riksmaten
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69446 (URN)10.1016/j.ijgfs.2018.08.003 (DOI)000452329100004 ()2-s2.0-85053321018 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-09 Created: 2018-10-09 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Monteagudo, C., Scander, H., Nilsen, B. & Yngve, A. (2017). Folate intake in a Swedish adult population: Food sources and predictive factors. Food & Nutrition Research, 61, Article ID 1328960.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Folate intake in a Swedish adult population: Food sources and predictive factors
2017 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 61, article id 1328960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Folate plays an important role in cell metabolism, but international studies show that intake is currently below recommendations, especially among women. The study objective was to identify folate food sources by food group, gender, and age group, and to identify factors influencing folate intake, based on food consumption data for Swedish adults in the 2010-11 Riksmaten study.

Methods: The sample included a representative Swedish population aged 18-80 years (n = 1657; 56.3% female). Food and nutrient intakes were estimated from self-reported food records during 4 consecutive days. Food consumption was categorized into 26 food groups. Stepwise regression was used to analyze food groups as folate sources for participants. Factors predicting the highest folate intake (third tertile) were determined by logistic regression analysis.

Results: Vegetables and pulses represented the most important folate source for all age groups and both genders, especially in women aged 45-64 years (49.7% of total folate intake). The next folate source in importance was dairy products for the youngest group (18-30 years), bread for men, and fruit and berries for women. The likelihood of being in the highest tertile of folate intake (odds ratio = 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.354-2.104) was higher for men. Influencing factors for folate intake in the highest tertile were low body mass index and high educational level in the men, and high educational level, vegetarian diet, organic product consumption, nonsmoking, and alcohol consumption within recommendations in the women.

Conclusion: This study describes the folate intake per food group of Swedish adults according to the 2010-11 Riksmaten survey, identifying vegetables and pulses as the most important source. Data obtained on factors related to folate consumption may be useful for the development of specific nutrition education programs to increase the intake of this vitamin in high-risk groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Dietary habits, Riksmaten study, vegetable consumption, lifestyle habits, demographic differences
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58796 (URN)10.1080/16546628.2017.1328960 (DOI)000403008600001 ()28659736 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

University of Granada 

Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Nilsen, B. B., Yngve, A., Monteagudo, C., Tellström, R., Scander, H. & Werner, B. (2017). Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven-to nine-year-old Swedish children. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(8), 886-894
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reported habitual intake of breakfast and selected foods in relation to overweight status among seven-to nine-year-old Swedish children
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 886-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the reported frequency of breakfast intake and selected food and beverages in the investigated group of Swedish children in comparison with recommended intakes. Furthermore, the study analyses these food habits and some demographic and lifestyle factors in relation to overweight and obesity.

Methods: This cross-sectional study builds on data collected in 2008 and 2010. Measured anthropometric data and parent questionnaire data were collected. A total of 2620 Swedish children (52.1% boys) aged seven to nine years were included.

Results: The majority of parents reported that their children (95.4%) had breakfast every day. The majority of children had fresh fruit (84.7%) and vegetables (83.9%) most days a week. Only 1.6% of the children were reported to have fast food and 6.0% to have sugar containing soft drinks, four days a week or more. The prevalence of overweight including obesity (OW/OB) was 17.8% for boys, 18.6% for girls. The odds of being OW/OB was higher among those not having breakfast every day (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.96), drinking diet soft drink (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.52-4.42) and skimmed/semi-skimmed milk (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.37-2.36) four days a week or more. Parents being overweight and having low education levels were also related to a higher risk of their children being overweight.

Conclusions: The parental reports of children's food habits pointed at favourable eating patterns for most investigated children. Breakfast skipping, diet soft drinks and low-fat milk consumption were more frequent among OW/OB children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the causal relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Child growth, breakfast, food habits, WHO Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63801 (URN)10.1177/1403494817724951 (DOI)000418185200021 ()29160159 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038350923 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Scander, H., Tellström, R. & Yngve, A. (2015). Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten. Paper presented at 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 67(Suppl. 1), 200-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten
2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 200-200Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Since appetite control works differently in fluid and solid intake we wanted to analyse the energy contribution from those two types of energy sources.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the beverage contribution of energy in Swedish meals, according to data from the National Survey (Riksmaten 2010-2011).

Method / Design: Around 1800 adult Swedes reported dietary intake data for four consecutive days - specified by portion size, type of meal, time point, day of the week and venue. The intake was reported in a web-based food diary. Energy contribution from drinks and food respectively was analysed, by weekday and type of meal, in regards to sugar containing drinks and those containing alcohol.

Results: The results show that the reported consumption of al-cohol was highest at home on weekends. The contribution of energy from drinks could be rather high, especially at dinner on Friday and Saturday night. The mean energy contribution from drinks in the daily intake was 235 kcal ± 231 (SD). This corresponds to 11.8 ± 10.8 (SD) energy percent (E%), varying from 9.1 (Wednesday) to 17.1 (Satur-day) E%. Problems in the interpretation of the data that need to be closely monitored are for example portion size, reluctance to report sweet and alcohol-containing drinks, difficulties in estimating dilution of different types of cordial and alcohol content in wine and beer.

Conclusions: Drinks were contributing substantially to the total energy intake over the day. The sweet and alcoholic drinks are im-portant in this regard, but also juices and coffee drinks. The problems in regards to the increased alcohol content of beer and red wine on the Swedish market will be further discussed with the Swedish Food Administration, to encourage development of a more comprehensive set of alternatives in the database

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2015
Keywords
Swedish Food Administration, alcohol, food and beverage combination, meal design
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50508 (URN)10.1159/000440895 (DOI)000374988801007 ()
Conference
12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015
Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-31 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Scander, H. (2015). Food and drink combinations in Swedish meals. Paper presented at 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 67(Suppl. 1), 13-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and drink combinations in Swedish meals
2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 13-13Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The Swedish national survey on dietary intake, Riksmaten, which took place in 2010-11, included details on day of the week, time point of consumption as well as where meals were consumed. The dietary data were collected through an online registration covering four days, combined with questionnaire data on educational level, lifestyle habits and self-perceived health. The data have previously been presented in regards to nutrient intake and food choice related to educational level. An interesting analysis on which drink that is consumed (or reported to be consumed) at different types of meals and with different food combinations and energy intakes has been undertaken.

The results show large differences in choice of drink depending on food choice, gender, day of the week and time of day. We have also shown that a large proportion of the energy intake comes from consumption of sweet or alcoholic drinks in between meals and in combination with meals.

It is important to inform the public about the choice of drink in relation to energy intake, especially for those aiming to restrict their intake. Our results will present a background for such guidelines. Some surprising results in regards to taste combinations will also be briefly discussed, from the sommelier’s horizon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2015
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition; Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50506 (URN)10.1159/000440895 (DOI)000374988800013 ()
Conference
12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), Berlin, Germany, October 20-23, 2015
Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-31 Last updated: 2018-10-09Bibliographically approved
Mikkelsen, B. E., Justesen, L., Wendin, K., Olsson, V., Yngve, A., Scander, H., . . . Mertanen, E. (2015). Research based educations for future foodscapes: the New NordicFood4Many experience. In: Culinary Arts and Sciences IX: . Paper presented at The International Conference on Culinary Aet and Sciences, At Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA, 3-5 June, 2015 (pp. 56-68). , IX
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research based educations for future foodscapes: the New NordicFood4Many experience
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Culinary Arts and Sciences IX, 2015, Vol. IX, p. 56-68Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogical Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45821 (URN)
Conference
The International Conference on Culinary Aet and Sciences, At Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA, 3-5 June, 2015
Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-16 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2435-3869

Search in DiVA

Show all publications