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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Manchaiah, V., Granberg, S., Grover, V., Saunders, G. H. & Ann Hall, D. (2019). Content validity and readability of patient-reported questionnaire instruments of hearing disability. International Journal of Audiology, 58(9), 565-575
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content validity and readability of patient-reported questionnaire instruments of hearing disability
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the content validity (i.e. domains assessed) and readability levels of patient-reported questionnaire instruments using internationally recognised procedures and tools.

DESIGN: A review of the literature to identify candidate instruments and a synthesis of information including mapping extracted items onto the World Health Organisation's - International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (WHO-ICF) and estimating readability.

STUDY SAMPLE: 14 patient-reported questionnaire instruments.

RESULTS: In general, item content focussed on body function and on activity limitations and participation restrictions, with less emphasis on environmental and personal factors and with different emphases across instruments. Many items did not clearly map onto any of the WHO-ICF categories (i.e. not coded items ranged from 3.7 to 39.1% across the 14 questionnaires). All 14 instruments exceeded the sixth-grade reading level when calculated according to the FORCAST formula which is appropriate for assessing a non-narrative text.

CONCLUSIONS: Clinical assessment of hearing disability is only as comprehensive as the items covered by the chosen measurement instrument. Our findings confirmed the diversity of domains covered by hearing disability instruments and gaps in assessment. Some concern is raised about whether the item content is appropriate for those respondents with poor literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Hearing disability, content validity, hearing loss, patient-reported questionnaire, readability
National Category
Occupational Therapy Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73944 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2019.1602738 (DOI)000469737900001 ()31017493 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065203059 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Manchaiah, V., Beukes, E. W., Granberg, S., Durisala, N., Baguley, D. M., Allen, P. M. & Andersson, G. (2018). Problems and Life Effects Experienced by Tinnitus Research Study Volunteers: An Exploratory Study Using the ICF Classification. Journal of american academy of audiology, 29(10), 936-947
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Problems and Life Effects Experienced by Tinnitus Research Study Volunteers: An Exploratory Study Using the ICF Classification
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2018 (English)In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 936-947Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Tinnitus is one of the most distressing hearing-related symptoms. It is often associated with a range of physiological and psychological complications, such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Hence, approaching tinnitus from a biopsychological perspective may be more appropriate than from purely a biomedical model.

Objective: The present studywas aimed at determining the relationship between tinnitus and the problems and life effects experienced by UK-based tinnitus research study volunteers. Open-ended questions were used. Responses were classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework to understand the impact of tinnitus in a multidimensional manner using a biopsychosocial perspective.

Research Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used.

Study Sample: Study sample included a sample of 240 adults with tinnitus who were interested in undertaking an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus.

Data Collection and Analysis: The data were collated using two open-ended questions. The first focused on problems related to having tinnitus and the second to life effects as a result of tinnitus. Responses were analyzed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concepts to ICF categories in accordance with established linking rules. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare the number of responses between the two questions. The most frequent responses related to body function involved ‘‘emotional functions’’ (b152), ‘‘sleep functions’’ (b134), ‘‘hearing functions’’ (b230), ‘‘sustaining attention’’ (b1400), and ‘‘energy level’’ (b1300). For activity limitations and participation restrictions they were ‘‘communicating with—receiving—spokenmessages’’ (d310), ‘‘socialization’’ (d9205), ‘‘handling stress and other psychological demands’’ (d240), and ‘‘recreation and leisure’’ (d920). The most frequently occurring responses related to environmental factors were ‘‘sound intensity’’ (e2500), ‘‘sound quality’’ (e2501), and ‘‘general products and technology for communication’’ (e1250). ‘‘Coping styles’’ was the most frequently occurring personal factor.

Conclusions: The study highlights the use of open-ended questions in gathering useful information about the impact of tinnitus. The responses coded to ICF show that tinnitus impacts many domains, not only particularly body function, but also activity limitations and participation restrictions. The results demonstrate the heterogeneous nature of the impact of tinnitus on people affected.

Results: There were 764 responses related to problems identified, 797 responses associated with life effects due to tinnitus, and 37 responses that did not fit into any ICF category. No significant differences were observed in the number of responses between the two questions. In addition, no significant association between the number of responses reported and demographic variables was found. Most of the problems and life effects experienced by tinnitus sufferers were related to body function, followed by activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Only a few responses were related to environmental and personal factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA, United States: American Academy of Audiology, 2018
Keywords
Activity limitations, body function, ICF, open-ended questions, participation restrictions, tinnitus
National Category
Other Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62807 (URN)10.3766/jaaa.17094 (DOI)000467875700008 ()30479266 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054561612 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

National Institute for Health Research 

Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Durisala, N., Manchaiah, V., Granberg, S. & Möller, K. (2017). Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants. Clinical Otolaryngology, 42(3), 748-752
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants
2017 (English)In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 1. Previous studies have shown the application of ICF in classifying hearing problems using open ended questionnaire.

2. The present study leveraged on that concept and used ICF in classifying hearing related problems and their effects on life style in adults with single-sided deafness.

3. We have used "problem and life effects" questionnaire to which patients were asked to list the problems and effects of hearing loss on their lives.

4. Apart from hearing and emotional related problems, use of an open ended questionnaire allowed tapping onto some of the non-auditory problems that these individuals may experience. 5.ICF classification provided basic information on the complex character of single sided deafness and can serve as a key element for rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Single-sided deafness, International classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50386 (URN)10.1111/coa.12671 (DOI)000399941300038 ()27184914 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018741268 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-30 Created: 2016-05-24 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S. (2017). Functioning in adults with hearing loss. In: Vinaya Manchaiah, Berth Danermark (Ed.), The experience of hearing loss: Journey through aural rehabilitation (pp. 17-28). New York, USA: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functioning in adults with hearing loss
2017 (English)In: The experience of hearing loss: Journey through aural rehabilitation / [ed] Vinaya Manchaiah, Berth Danermark, New York, USA: Routledge, 2017, p. 17-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
hearing loss, aural rehabilitation
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62805 (URN)9781138642201 (ISBN)9781138642225 (ISBN)9781315630090 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S. (2015). Functioning and disability in adults with hearing loss: the preparatory studies in the ICF Core sets for hearing loss project. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro university
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functioning and disability in adults with hearing loss: the preparatory studies in the ICF Core sets for hearing loss project
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Hearing loss (HL) is a health condition that affects more than 360 million people worldwide. The findings from previous research point at the adverse relationship between adults with hearing loss and important aspects of everyday life such as social relations, communication and work-related tasks. However, the overall picture concerning the functional and disabling aspects of adults with HL re- mains incomplete. To identify the functional and disabling aspects, a conceptual and/or theoretical framework is required. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) offer a multidimensional framework based on bio-psycho-social assumptions about health. In previous research inves- tigations in which the ICF has been used, some utility problems in the linking (relating) of data to the classification have been highlighted.

The aims of the present thesis were to explore the areas of functioning and disability of relevance for adults with HL and to explore how audiological data can be linked to ICF. The aims were explored by applying the methodology of the ‘interdisciplinary evidence-based approach to functioning and disability in adults with HL’, acknowledging the merging of three perspectives designated the Researcher, the Patient and the Professional perspective. Four studies that focus on the three perspectives were conducted. All results were linked to the ICF classification. The results were merged into a model designated ‘the integrative model of functioning and disability in adults with HL’.

When the three perspectives were linked, the results revealed several aspects of relevance for the target group. Bodily (individual) dimensions, such as hear- ing, auditory perception, memory, attention, energy, and emotions, were acknowledged. Aspects of everyday life such as conversations, the usage of communication strategies, family relationships and work, were highlighted. Influential environmental factors, such as noise, assistive technical devices, the design of public buildings, social support and the attitudes of people in the envi- ronment, were also identified. In conclusion, interactions seemed to be vital as almost all identified aspects highlighted or were tied to this dimension of human functioning. Further, concerning the linking of the data it was acknowledged that the ICF and the research area of adult HL do not fully comply. Suggestions for improvements in future revisions of the ICF were highlighted and discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro university, 2015. p. 139
Series
Studies from The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 73
Keywords
hearing loss, adults, ICF, classification, functioning, disability, linking
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45274 (URN)978-91-7529-086-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-09-11, Prismahuset, Hörsal 2, Örebro universitet, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Funding agency: Oticon Foundation; Hörselforskningsfonden (Swedish HearingResearch Foundation); the Foundation for Audiological Research (FAR) Forskningskommitten, Region Örebro County

Available from: 2015-07-20 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S., Dahlström, J., Möller, C., Kähäri, K. & Danermark, B. (2014). The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research. International Journal of Audiology, 53(2), 65-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 65-76Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies.

Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II.

Study sample: The study population included adults (>= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication.

Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by 'instrument type', and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies.

Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Hearing loss, audiology, ICF, ICF core sets, outcome assessment, systematic literature review
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33754 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.851799 (DOI)000329834600001 ()24313738 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892578224 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Oticon Foundation  

Stinger Foundation

Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S., Pronk, M., Swanepoel, D. W., Kramer, S. E., Hagsten, H., Hjaldahl, J., . . . Danermark, B. (2014). The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective. International Journal of Audiology, 53(11), 777-786
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied.

Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (18 years of age) with HL (20–95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories.

Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities & Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability.

Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
ICF, ICF core sets, focus groups, qualitative study, patient perspective
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39251 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.938370 (DOI)000343928200001 ()25311099 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911460995 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Oticon Foundation  

Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S., Swanepoel, D. W., Englund, U., Möller, C. & Danermark, B. (2014). The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF). International Journal of Audiology, 53(8), 497-506
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 497-506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Hearing loss; audiology; ICF; ICF core sets; hearing health professionals; expert survey
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34834 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.900196 (DOI)000339630500001 ()24754459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904126425 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Oticon Foundation

Hörselforskningsfonden (Swedish hearing research foundation)

Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Granberg, S., Möller, K., Skagerstrand, Å., Möller, C. & Danermark, B. (2014). The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). International Journal of Audiology, 53(2), 77-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Hearing loss, audiology, ICF, linking, ICF core sets
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33755 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.858279 (DOI)000329834600002 ()24329490 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892619855 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Oticon Foundation  

Stinger Foundation

Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Danermark, B., Granberg, S., Kramer, S. E., Selb, M. & Möller, C. (2013). The Creation of a Comprehensive and a Brief Core Set for Hearing Loss Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. American Journal of Audiology, 22(2), 323-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Creation of a Comprehensive and a Brief Core Set for Hearing Loss Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
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2013 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 323-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: In May 2001, to integrate biological, psychological, and social aspects of human functioning, the World Health Assembly endorsed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The aim of this article is to describe the creation of Comprehensive and Brief ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss. The core sets consist of the most relevant ICF categories for hearing loss. Method and Results: Four preparatory studies were carried out and presented at a consensus conference, resulting in a Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, consisting of 117 ICF categories, and a Brief ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, consisting of 27 categories (of the 117). Conclusion: The Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss can be a user-friendly tool for conducting comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessments. The Brief ICF Core Set can be used for many purposes, such as research and population studies. However, its most common use is by individuals seeking to provide a brief description and assessment of functioning of a person with hearing loss.

Keywords
hearing loss, Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, Brief ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF)
National Category
Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33758 (URN)10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0052) (DOI)000330024500020 ()
Note

Funding Agencies:

Oticon Research Foundation  

Nordic Audiological Society  

Stinger Foundation  

Hearing Foundation  

ICF Research Branch 

Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2298-6806

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