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Strand, Susanne, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8285-0935
Publications (10 of 112) Show all publications
Shepard, S., Strand, S., Viljoen, J. & Daffern, M. (2018). Evaluating the utility of ‘strength’ items when assessing the risk of young offenders. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the utility of ‘strength’ items when assessing the risk of young offenders
2018 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, ISSN 1478-9949, E-ISSN 1478-9957Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

There is emerging recognition that positive or pro-social characteristics may lessen criminal propensity. There are now several adult and youth forensic instruments that include protective or strength components. Yet evidence supporting the protective capacities of these instruments with youth offending populations is still developing. This study aimed to identity the prevalence of strength items on the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory tool, and their relationships with risk and re-offending for a cohort of 212 multi-cultural Australian juveniles in custody. The prevalence of strengths in the sample was low, and differed by cultural group. Young people who possessed a strength yielded lower instrument total and domain scores and were more likely to be afforded a lower level of risk compared to youth without a strength. Moreover, youth who possessed a strength were significantly more likely to desist from re-offending. This association remained after controlling for level of risk. Findings point to the importance of strengths when assessing a young person’s risk for re-offending.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
youth violence; protective factors; yls/cMi; violence risk assessment; strengths
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64325 (URN)10.1080/14789949.2018.1425474 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Strand, S. & Storey, J. (2018). Intimate Partner Violence in Urban, Rural and Remote Areas: An Investigation of Offense Severity and Risk Factors. Violence against Women
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intimate Partner Violence in Urban, Rural and Remote Areas: An Investigation of Offense Severity and Risk Factors
2018 (English)In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study compared the severity of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the relationship between risk factors for IPV and overall risk judgments of future IPV in urban, rural, and remote areas. IPV risk assessments conducted by the Swedish police between 2010 and 2014 in urban (n = 564), rural (n = 456), and remote (n = 196) areas were examined. Rurality was associated with the severity of IPV reported, as well as the presence of risk factors and their relationship to overall risk judgments. Cases in remote areas included more severe IPV as well as more risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Intimate Partner violence, risk factors, Urban, rural and remote areas, rurality
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64320 (URN)10.1177/1077801218766611 (DOI)29623774 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Fröberg, S. & Strand, S. (2018). Police Students' Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence in Same-Sex Relationships. Partner Abuse, 9(2), 181-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Police Students' Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence in Same-Sex Relationships
2018 (English)In: Partner Abuse, ISSN 1946-6560, E-ISSN 1946-6579, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 181-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The knowledge of same-sex intimate partner violence (IPV) is limited. This study aims to investigate the perception of seriousness of same-sex IPV. A vignette study was undertaken among 248 police students (69% males and 31% females) in Sweden. The vignettes portrayed an intimate partner relationship between two people and were available in four versions with the sex of the offender and victim being alternated. Perceptions of IPV were measured using the Opinions of Domestic Violence Scale (Ahmed et al., 2013). The results showed that regardless of gender, IPV was considered serious; however, same-sex IPV was perceived as less serious than victimization of a heterosexual female but more serious than victimization of a heterosexual male. Police interventions were found to be less needed for same-sex victims than for heterosexual female victims.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
intimate partner violence, same-sex relationships, policing, perception
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66998 (URN)10.1891/1946-6560.9.2.181 (DOI)000431561000005 ()
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Selenius, H. & Strand, S. (2017). Experiences of self-injury and aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 71(4), 304-311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of self-injury and aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care
2017 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Self-injury and institutional violence are well-known characteristics of female forensic psychiatric patients, but research on patients' experiences of these behaviours is limited.

Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate how female forensic psychiatric patients describe their self-injury and aggression.

Methods: The authors performed qualitative in-depth interviews with 13 female forensic psychiatric inpatients. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results: The analysis resulted in three themes describing the process of handling negative thoughts and emotions by using self-injury or aggression towards others and thereby experiencing satisfaction. Both self-injury and aggression were experienced as strategies for emotional regulation. The forensic psychiatric care was perceived as important for the women in developing less harmful strategies for coping with negative thoughts and emotions instead of injuring themselves or others.

Conclusions: Self-injury and aggression are often risk-assessed separately, but results from the present study suggest that these behaviours need a more holistic approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Aggression, female patients, forensic psychiatry, selfinjury, thematic analysis
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55405 (URN)10.1080/08039488.2017.1283443 (DOI)000399740500010 ()28152333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85011552095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
McEwan, T. E., Bateson, S. & Strand, S. (2017). Improving police risk assessment and management of family violence through a collaboration between law enforcement, forensic mental health and academia. Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, 3(2), 119-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving police risk assessment and management of family violence through a collaboration between law enforcement, forensic mental health and academia
2017 (English)In: Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, ISSN 2056-3841, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Police play an essential role in reducing harms associated with family violence by identifying people at increased risk of physical or mental health-related harm and linking them with support services. Yet police are often poorly trained and resourced to conduct the kind of assessments necessary to identify family violence cases presenting with increased risk. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper describes a multi-project collaboration between law enforcement, forensic mental health, and academia that has over three years worked to improve risk assessment and management of family violence by police in Victoria, Australia.

Findings: Evaluation of existing risk assessment instruments used by the state-wide police force showed they were ineffective in predicting future police reports of family violence (AUC = 0.54-0.56). However, the addition of forensic psychology expertise to specialist family violence teams increased the number of risk management strategies implemented by police, and suggested that the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk assessment instrument may be appropriate for use by Australian police (AUC = 0.63).

Practical implications: The practical implications of this study are as follows: police risk assessment procedures should be subject to independent evaluation to determine whether they are performing as intended; multidisciplinary collaboration within police units can improve police practice; drawing on expertise from agencies external to police offers a way to improve evidence-based policing, and structured professional judgement risk assessment can be used in policing contexts with appropriate training and support.

Originality/value: The paper describes an innovative collaboration between police, mental health, and academia that is leading to improved police practices in responding to family violence. It includes data from the first evaluation of an Australian risk assessment instrument for family violence, and describes methods of improving police systems for responding to family violence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Policing, Evidence-based practice, Risk assessment, Intimate partner violence, Actuarial risk assessment, Family violence
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61105 (URN)10.1108/JCRPP-01-2017-0004 (DOI)000409918200005 ()
Note

Funding Agency:

Macedon Ranges and North West Melbourne Medicare Local

Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2017-09-21Bibliographically approved
Wood, M., Strand, S. & Mc Ewan, T. E. (2017). Introducing evidence-based risk assessment procedures to improve policing practice in the assessment and management of family violence. In: : . Paper presented at Asia Pacific Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (APATAP 2017), Singapore, February 13-15, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing evidence-based risk assessment procedures to improve policing practice in the assessment and management of family violence
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54140 (URN)
Conference
Asia Pacific Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (APATAP 2017), Singapore, February 13-15, 2017
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Petersson, J. & Strand, S. (2017). Policing family violence in rural areas. In: : . Paper presented at The Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policing family violence in rural areas
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This presentation will describe the primary results of a prospective research project spanning over eight years (2009-2016), introducing a structured approach to policing family violence. This research project was funded by the Swedish Crime Victim Support and Compensation Authority. The aim of the research project was to implement and evaluate the use of structured professional judgments tool of assessing violence for risk. More specifically, risk assessment checklists for intimate partner violence, stalking, and honor related violence was introduced as a working method within the two Swedish police districts of Jämtland and Västernorrland. The first phase of the project constituted of the implementation of the risk assessment checklists. This involved training the police in how to use the checklists. The second phase of the project constituted of data collection and evaluation. Thus, risk assessments performed between 2011 and 2014 for all police-reported cases of intimate partner violence, stalking, and honor related violence in the two police districts were collected. Furthermore, risk management strategies recommended by the police, in order to prevent future violence, were evaluated. Additionally, qualitative interviews with police and district attorneys were conducted. The results demonstrated that the use of structured violence risk assessment checklists works well within the Swedish police to reduce the risk for violence by suggesting proper risk management. However, the results demonstrated that there was no existing routine for documenting the risk management strategies, making follow up evaluation of their efficacy difficult. Finally, an overall presentation of the research papers produced, based on the results of this project, will be given.

National Category
Other Social Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59346 (URN)
Conference
The Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, June 19-21, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-24 Created: 2017-08-24 Last updated: 2017-09-04Bibliographically approved
Petersson, J. & Strand, S. (2017). Recidivism in intimate partner violence among antisocial and family-only perpetrators. In: : . Paper presented at 17th Annual conference of the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services (IAFMHS 2017), Split, Croatia, June 13-15, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recidivism in intimate partner violence among antisocial and family-only perpetrators
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research of recidivism among intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrator subtypes has demonstrated inconclusive results. The present study sought to outline the recidivism patterns between two subtypes; antisocial and family-only perpetrators. The aim of this study was to compare these subtypes regarding IPV recidivism rates and type of recidivism crime. We also explored and compared time to IPV recidivism between the subtypes. In this prospective study data was obtained from the Swedish police. The material constituted of 628 male IPV perpetrators subjected to a structured violence risk assessment between 2011 and 2014 in two Swedish police districts. The perpetrators were categorized as antisocial (n = 327) or family-only (n = 301) based on general criminality. Recidivism was measured as any new police report of an IPV related crime. Results demonstrated that antisocial perpetrators recidivated to a larger extent than family-only perpetrators (27.2% vs. 12.9%). Antisocial perpetrators were more prone to recidivate in both physical and non-physical violence. Furthermore, antisocial perpetrators had a longer critical time period for recidivism and recidivated faster in non-physically violent IPV compared to family-only perpetrators. These findings highlight the need to consider different risk management strategies depending on the type of IPV perpetrator in order to prevent future violence.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59345 (URN)
Conference
17th Annual conference of the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services (IAFMHS 2017), Split, Croatia, June 13-15, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-24 Created: 2017-08-24 Last updated: 2017-09-04Bibliographically approved
Petersson, J. & Strand, S. (2017). Recidivism in Intimate Partner Violence Among Antisocial and Family-Only Perpetrators. Criminal justice and behavior, 44(11), 1477-1495
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recidivism in Intimate Partner Violence Among Antisocial and Family-Only Perpetrators
2017 (English)In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 1477-1495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare antisocial and family-only intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators in terms of IPV recidivism rates, type of recidivism crime, and time to recidivism. A total sample of 628 perpetrators was categorized as antisocial (n = 327) or family-only (n = 301) based on general criminality. Results demonstrated that antisocial perpetrators recidivated to a larger extent than family-only perpetrators (27.2% vs. 12.9%). Antisocial perpetrators were more prone to recidivate in both physical and nonphysical violence. Of the perpetrators who recidivated, the majority did so within the first year after their index crime. However, antisocial perpetrators recidivated more than family-only perpetrators after the first year. key findings consisted of the subtypes’ differing propensity to reoffend and their different critical time periods for recidivism. These findings suggest the need for different risk management strategies depending on perpetrator subtype to prevent future violence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
intimate partner violence; recidivism; perpetrators; antisocial; family-only
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61083 (URN)10.1177/0093854817719916 (DOI)000418299300005 ()2-s2.0-85030320762 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Strand, S. & Selenius, H. (2017). The prevalence of severe intimate partner violence in Sweden. In: Diana Scharff Peterson and Julie A. Schroeder (Ed.), Domestic violence in international context: (pp. 41-54). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The prevalence of severe intimate partner violence in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Domestic violence in international context / [ed] Diana Scharff Peterson and Julie A. Schroeder, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2017
Series
Routledge Studies in Crime and Society ; 27
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54051 (URN)9781315618098 (ISBN)9781138669642 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8285-0935

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