oru.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Edebol-Carlman, H., Rode, J., König, J., Hutchinson, A., Repsilber, D., Kiselev, A., . . . Brummer, R. J. (2019). Evaluating the effects of probiotic intake on brain activity during an emotional attention task and blood markers related to stress in healthy subjects. In: : . Paper presented at Mind, Mood & Microbes, 2nd International Conference on Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17-18 January, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the effects of probiotic intake on brain activity during an emotional attention task and blood markers related to stress in healthy subjects
Show others...
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73848 (URN)
Conference
Mind, Mood & Microbes, 2nd International Conference on Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17-18 January, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-17 Created: 2019-04-17 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Längkvist, M., Jendeberg, J., Thunberg, P., Loutfi, A. & Lidén, M. (2018). Computer aided detection of ureteral stones in thin slice computed tomography volumes using Convolutional Neural Networks. Computers in Biology and Medicine, 97, 153-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer aided detection of ureteral stones in thin slice computed tomography volumes using Convolutional Neural Networks
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Computers in Biology and Medicine, ISSN 0010-4825, E-ISSN 1879-0534, Vol. 97, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Computed tomography (CT) is the method of choice for diagnosing ureteral stones - kidney stones that obstruct the ureter. The purpose of this study is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm for identifying a ureteral stone in thin slice CT volumes. The challenge in CAD for urinary stones lies in the similarity in shape and intensity of stones with non-stone structures and how to efficiently deal with large high-resolution CT volumes. We address these challenges by using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) that works directly on the high resolution CT volumes. The method is evaluated on a large data base of 465 clinically acquired high-resolution CT volumes of the urinary tract with labeling of ureteral stones performed by a radiologist. The best model using 2.5D input data and anatomical information achieved a sensitivity of 100% and an average of 2.68 false-positives per patient on a test set of 88 scans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Computer aided detection, Ureteral stone, Convolutional neural networks, Computed tomography, Training set selection, False positive reduction
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67139 (URN)10.1016/j.compbiomed.2018.04.021 (DOI)000435623700015 ()29730498 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046800526 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden  OLL-597511 

Vinnova under the project "Interactive Deep Learning for 3D image analysis"  

Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
Krauss, W., Gunnarsson, M., Nilsson, M. & Thunberg, P. (2018). Conventional and synthetic MRI in multiple sclerosis: a comparative study. European Radiology, 28(4), 1692-1700
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conventional and synthetic MRI in multiple sclerosis: a comparative study
2018 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1692-1700Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To compare the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using synthetic and conventional MRI.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Synthetic and conventional axial images were prospectively acquired for 52 patients with diagnosed MS. Quantitative MRI (qMRI) was used for measuring proton density and relaxation times (T1, T2) and then, based on these parameters, synthetic T1W, T2W and FLAIR images were calculated. Image stacks were reviewed blindly, independently and in random order by two radiologists. The number and location for all lesions were documented and categorised. A combined report of lesion load and presence of contrast-enhancing lesions was compiled for each patient. Agreement was evaluated using kappa statistic.

RESULTS: There was no significant difference in lesion detection using synthetic and conventional MRI in any anatomical region or for any of the three image types. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were mainly higher (p < 0.05) using conventional images but there was no significant difference in any specific region or for any image type. There was no significant difference in the outcome of the combined reports.

CONCLUSION: Synthetic MR images show potential to be used in the assessment of MS dissemination in space (DIS) despite a slightly lower inter- and intra-observer agreement compared to conventional MRI.

KEY POINTS:

• Synthetic MR images may potentially be useful in the assessment of MS.

• Examination times may be shortened.

• Inter- and intra-observer agreement is generally higher using conventional MRI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Multiple sclerosis; Magnetic resonance imaging; Inter- and intra-observer agreement; Synthetic MRI; Quantitative MRI
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63025 (URN)10.1007/s00330-017-5100-9 (DOI)000426645600039 ()29134354 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85033566123 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Region Örebro County, Sweden

Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Lidén, M., Jendeberg, J., Längkvist, M., Loutfi, A. & Thunberg, P. (2018). Discrimination between distal ureteral stones and pelvic phleboliths in CT using a deep neural network: more than local features needed. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress of Radiology (ECR) 2018, Vienna, Austria, 28 Feb.-4 Mar., 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discrimination between distal ureteral stones and pelvic phleboliths in CT using a deep neural network: more than local features needed
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To develop a deep learning method for assisting radiologists in the discrimination between distal ureteral stones and pelvic phleboliths in thin slice CT images, and to evaluate whether this differentiation is possible using only local features.

Methods and materials: A limited field-of-view image data bank was retrospectively created, consisting of 5x5x5 cm selections from 1 mm thick unenhanced CT images centered around 218 pelvis phleboliths and 267 distal ureteral stones in 336 patients. 50 stones and 50 phleboliths formed a validation cohort and the remainder a training cohort. Ground truth was established by a radiologist using the complete CT examination during inclusion.The limited field-of-view CT stacks were independently reviewed and classified as containing a distal ureteral stone or a phlebolith by seven radiologists. Each cropped stack consisted of 50 slices (5x5 cm field-of-view) and was displayed in a standard PACS reading environment. A convolutional neural network using three perpendicular images (2.5D-CNN) from the limited field-of-view CT stacks was trained for classification.

Results: The 2.5D-CNN obtained 89% accuracy (95% confidence interval 81%-94%) for the classification in the unseen validation cohort while the accuracy of radiologists reviewing the same cohort was 86% (range 76%-91%). There was no statistically significant difference between 2.5D-CNN and radiologists.

Conclusion: The 2.5D-CNN achieved radiologist level classification accuracy between distal ureteral stones and pelvic phleboliths when only using the local features. The mean accuracy of 86% for radiologists using limited field-of-view indicates that distant anatomical information that helps identifying the ureter’s course is needed.

National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67372 (URN)
Conference
European Congress of Radiology (ECR) 2018, Vienna, Austria, 28 Feb.-4 Mar., 2018
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Andersson, K. M., Vallhagen Dahlgren, C., Reizenstein, J., Cao, Y., Ahnesjö, A. & Thunberg, P. (2018). Evaluation of two commercial CT metal artifact reduction algorithms for use in proton radiotherapy treatment planning in the head and neck area. Medical physics (Lancaster), 45(10), 4329-4344
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of two commercial CT metal artifact reduction algorithms for use in proton radiotherapy treatment planning in the head and neck area
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 4329-4344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To evaluate two commercial CT metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms for use in proton treatment planning in the head and neck (H&N) area.

METHODS: An anthropomorphic head phantom with removable metallic implants (dental fillings or neck implant) was CT-scanned to evaluate the O-MAR (Philips) and the iMAR (Siemens) algorithms. Reference images were acquired without any metallic implants in place. Water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated for different path directions and compared between image sets. Images were also evaluated for use in proton treatment planning for parotid, tonsil, tongue base, and neck node targets. The beams were arranged so as to not traverse any metal prior to the target, enabling evaluation of the impact on dose calculation accuracy from artifacts surrounding the metal volume. Plans were compared based on γ analysis (1 mm distance-to-agreement/1% difference in local dose) and dose volume histogram metrics for targets and organs at risk (OARs). Visual grading evaluation of 30 dental implant patient MAR images was performed by three radiation oncologists.

RESULTS: In the dental fillings images, ΔWET along a low-density streak was reduced from -17.0 to -4.3 mm with O-MAR and from -16.1 mm to -2.3 mm with iMAR, while for other directions the deviations were increased or approximately unchanged when the MAR algorithms were used. For the neck implant images, ΔWET was generally reduced with MAR but residual deviations remained (of up to -2.3 mm with O-MAR and of up to -1.5 mm with iMAR). The γ analysis comparing proton dose distributions for uncorrected/MAR plans and corresponding reference plans showed passing rates >98% of the voxels for all phantom plans. However, substantial dose differences were seen in areas of most severe artifacts (γ passing rates of down to 89% for some cases). MAR reduced the deviations in some cases, but not for all plans. For a single patient case dosimetrically evaluated, minor dose differences were seen between the uncorrected and MAR plans (γ passing rate approximately 97%). The visual grading of patient images showed that MAR significantly improved image quality (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: O-MAR and iMAR significantly improved image quality in terms of anatomical visualization for target and OAR delineation in dental implant patient images. WET calculations along several directions, all outside the metallic regions, showed that both uncorrected and MAR images contained metal artifacts which could potentially lead to unacceptable errors in proton treatment planning. ΔWET was reduced by MAR in some areas, while increased or unchanged deviations were seen for other path directions. The proton treatment plans created for the phantom images showed overall acceptable dose distributions differences when compared to the reference cases, both for the uncorrected and MAR images. However, substantial dose distribution differences in the areas of most severe artifacts were seen for some plans, which were reduced by MAR in some cases but not all. In conclusion, MAR could be beneficial to use for proton treatment planning; however, case-by-case evaluations of the metal artifact-degraded images are always recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
computed tomography, dose calculation, metal artifacts, proton therapy, radiotherapy
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69623 (URN)10.1002/mp.13115 (DOI)000446995000017 ()30076784 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053551543 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Uppsala-Örebro Regional Research Council  

Research Committee in Region Örebro Council, Sweden  

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Lidén, M., Wodecki, M., Thunberg, P. & Rask, P. (2017). Impact of Heart Rate on Flow Measurements in Aortic Regurgitation. Journal of Heart Valve Disease, 26(5), 502-508, Article ID 4562.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Heart Rate on Flow Measurements in Aortic Regurgitation
2017 (English)In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 502-508, article id 4562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Flow measurements using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) enable quantification of the stroke volume, regurgitant volume (RV) and regurgitant fraction (RF) in patients with aortic regurgitation (AR). These variables are used to assess the severity of the valve disease and for the timing of surgery. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of an increased heart rate on measurement of the RV and RF in patients with AR.

METHODS: Among 13 patients with known moderate or severe AR, regurgitant flow measurements, using phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging, were obtained in the ascending aorta. Flow measurements were obtained at rest and at increased heart rates after intravenous administration of atropine.

RESULTS: The mean heart rate was 61 beats per min at rest and 91 beats per min after atropine administration. The RV and RF were 52 ml and 35% at rest, respectively, and 34 ml (p <0.001) and 30% (p = 0.065) at increased heart rate, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: An increased heart rate leads to a decreased RV. The RF is more stable and may therefore be preferable for severity grading in AR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
I C R Publishers Ltd., 2017
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67603 (URN)29762918 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Andersson, K. M., Vallhagen Dahlgren, C., Reizenstein, J., Ahnesjö, A. & Thunberg, P. (2017). Impact of Metal Artifacts on Proton Therapy Treatment Planning Accuracy. In: 56th Annual Meeting of the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group (PTCOG) 8-13 May 2017: Proceedings. Paper presented at 56th Annual Meeting of the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group (PTCOG 56), Yokohama, Japan, May 8-13, 2017 (pp. 68-68). The Particle Therapy Cooperative Group, 4, Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Metal Artifacts on Proton Therapy Treatment Planning Accuracy
Show others...
2017 (English)In: 56th Annual Meeting of the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group (PTCOG) 8-13 May 2017: Proceedings, The Particle Therapy Cooperative Group , 2017, Vol. 4, p. 68-68, article id 1Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate for proton therapy treatment planning the feasibility of two commercial metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms in CT-imaging.

Materials and Methods: A head phantom with removable dental fillings and a body phantom with a removable hip prosthesis were scanned to evaluate O-MAR (Philips) and iMAR (Siemens). Reference images (scans without metal) were acquired and subtracted from the uncorrected (no MAR) and MAR-images. CT number-differences were mapped to differences in stopping power ratios to water. In addition, proton treatment plans for a parotid, tonsil and prostate-target were optimized based on uncorrected and MAR images and recalculated on reference images. Beams were arranged to not traverse metal, enabling evaluation of metal artifact impact on target coverage.

Results: MAR algorithms reduced the most extreme dental filling artifacts, but residual artifacts still remained. iMAR reduced hip prosthesis artifacts to large extent, while considerable artifacts still were present with O-MAR. For parotid and tonsil-plans, D98%to PTV was nearly intact in the reference recalculations for both uncorrected and MAR-based plans, with maximum-difference,0.3%. For uncorrected prostate plans, D98%decreased more than 4% in the reference recalculation. For the iMAR prostate plan, D98%was almost identical in the reference recalculation (97.5% versus 97.4%). A slight D98%-decrease was seen in the reference for the O-MAR based plan (96.8% versus 97.5%).

Conclusion: Hip prosthesis artifacts reduced target coverage accuracy, but it was substantially improved with MAR algorithms. Dental filling artifacts were moderately reduced with MAR, but did not substantially affect target coverage

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Particle Therapy Cooperative Group, 2017
Series
International Journal of Particle Therapy, E-ISSN 2331-5180 ; Vol. 4 (2017): 1
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63384 (URN)10.14338/IJPT.17-PTCOG-1.1 (DOI)
Conference
56th Annual Meeting of the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group (PTCOG 56), Yokohama, Japan, May 8-13, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Jorstig, S., Waldenborg, M., Lidén, M. & Thunberg, P. (2017). Right ventricular ejection fraction measurements using two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography by applying an ellipsoid model. Cardiovascular Ultrasound, 15, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Right ventricular ejection fraction measurements using two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography by applying an ellipsoid model
2017 (English)In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 15, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is today no established approach to estimate right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) using 2D transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The aim of this study was to evaluate a new method for RVEF calculations using 2D TTE and compare the results with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE).

Methods: A total of 37 subjects, 25 retrospectively included patients and twelve healthy volunteers, were included to give a wide range of RVEF. The right ventricle (RV) was modeled as a part of an ellipsoid enabling calculation of the RV volume by combining three distance measurements. RVEF calculated according to the model, RVEFTTE, were compared with reference CMR-derived RVEF, RVEFCMR. Further, TAPSE was measured in the TTE images and the correlations were calculated between RVEFTTE, TAPSE and RVEFCMR.

Results: The mean values were RVEFCMR = 43 +/- 12% (range 20-66%) and RVEFTTE = 50 +/- 9% (range 34-65%). There was a high correlation (r = 0.80, p < 0.001) between RVEFTTE and RVEFCMR. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference between RVEFCMR and RVEFTTE of 6 percentage points (ppt) with limits of agreement from -11 to 23 ppt. The mean value for TAPSE was 19 +/- 5 mm and the correlation between TAPSE and RVEFCMR was moderate (r = 0.54, p < 0.001). The correlation between RVEFTTE and RVEFCMR was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the correlation between TAPSE and RVEFCMR.

Conclusions: The ellipsoid model shows promise for RVEF calculations using 2D TTE for a wide range of RVEF, providing RVEF estimates that were significantly better correlated to RVEF obtained from CMR compared to TAPSE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Right ventricle, Right ventricular function, Echocardiography, Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Cardiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57065 (URN)10.1186/s12947-017-0096-5 (DOI)000396781100001 ()28270161 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014670050 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Committee of Region Orebro County  OLL-573211

Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Hellstrandh Jorstig, S., Waldenborg, M., Lidén, M., Wodecki, M. & Thunberg, P. (2016). Determination of Right Ventricular Volume by Combining Echocardiographic Distance Measurements. Echocardiography, 33(6), 844-853
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of Right Ventricular Volume by Combining Echocardiographic Distance Measurements
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Echocardiography, ISSN 0742-2822, E-ISSN 1540-8175, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 844-853Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The position of the right ventricle (RV), often partly behind the sternum, implies difficulties to image the RV free wall using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and consequently limits the possibilities of stroke volume calculations. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the volume of the right ventricle (RV) can be determined by combining TTE distance measurements that do not need the RV free wall to be fully visualized.

Methods: The RV volume was approximated by an ellipsoid composed of three distances. Distance measurements, modeled RV stroke volumes (RVSV), and RV ejection fraction (RVEF) were compared to reference values obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for 12 healthy volunteers.

Results: Inter-modality comparisons showed that distance measurements were significantly underestimated in TTE compared to CMR. The modeled RV volumes using TTE distance measurements were underestimated compared to reference CMR volumes. There was, however, for TTE an agreement between modeled RVSV and left ventricular stroke volumes determined by biplane Simpson's rule. Similar agreement was shown between modeled RVSV based on CMR distance measurements and the CMR reference. Regarding RVEF, further studies including patients with a wider range of RVEF are needed to evaluate the method.

Conclusion: In conclusion, the ellipsoid model of the RV provides good estimates of RVSVs, but volumes based on distance measurements from different modalities cannot be used interchangeably.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
Keywords
Right ventricle, right ventricular volume, ejection fraction, echoc ardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Cardiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50370 (URN)10.1111/echo.13173 (DOI)000379944600005 ()26841195 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84975297303 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro County Council

Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Jorstig, S., Emilsson, K., Waldenborg, M., Lidén, M., Wodecki, M. & Thunberg, P. (2016). Distance and area measurement of the right atrium and ventricle by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: do we measure the same thing?. In: : . Paper presented at 19th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography, Seville, Spain, December 2-5, 2015 (pp. 214-214). Oxford University Press, Article ID P1276.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distance and area measurement of the right atrium and ventricle by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: do we measure the same thing?
Show others...
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: It has previously been shown that stroke volumes measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) are underestimated, compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in distance and area measurements of the right atrium (RA) and the right ventricle (RV) by TTE and CMR.

Methods: TTE examinations and CMR examinations were subsequently performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Three distances (RAL - right atrial length, RVIT3 - right ventricular inflow tract, RVLAX - right ventricular long axis) and one area (RVA - right ventricular area) were measured in TTE and CMR. Stroke volumes were also calculated using conventional methods available on each modality. Both intramodality and intermodality comparisons were performed based on measurements from three observers. One of the observers performed measurements in both TTE and CMR.

Results: Intermodality comparisons showed that all distance and area measurements were significantly smaller using TTE (Table 1). Two of the measurements, RVIT3 and RVA, differed at about 50%. Calculated stroke volumes showed, consistent with previous results, that the TTE stroke volumes are substantially underestimated compared to CMR volumes. Intramodality variations of distance and area measurements were considerably smaller (Table 1).

Conclusions: Our results show that RV distances and areas measured by TTE are smaller compared to CMR, probably due to differences in defining the endocardial borders. These differences subsequently result in smaller stroke volumes when using TTE. Caution should be taken when comparing distances, areas and volumes measured by TTE and CMR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
Series
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412 ; Vol. 16 (2015): Suppl. 2
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63463 (URN)10.1093/ehjci/jev270 (DOI)
Conference
19th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography, Seville, Spain, December 2-5, 2015
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8351-3367

Search in DiVA

Show all publications