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Cao, Yang, Associate ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3552-9153
Publications (10 of 84) Show all publications
Khalili, H., Ahl, R., Paydar, S., Sjölin, G., Cao, Y., Fard, H. A., . . . Mohseni, S. (2020). Beta-Blocker Therapy in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial. World Journal of Surgery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beta-Blocker Therapy in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial
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2020 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Observational studies have demonstrated improved outcomes in TBI patients receiving in-hospital beta-blockers. The aim of this study is to conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effect of beta-blockers on outcomes in TBI patients.

Methods: Adult patients with severe TBI (intracranial AIS >= 3) were included in the study. Hemodynamically stable patients at 24 h after injury were randomized to receive either 20 mg propranolol orally every 12 h up to 10 days or until discharge (BB+) or no propranolol (BB-). Outcomes of interest were in-hospital mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E) score on discharge and at 6-month follow-up. Subgroup analysis including only isolated severe TBI (intracranial AIS >= 3 with extracranial AIS <= 2) was carried out. Poisson regression models were used.

Results: Two hundred nineteen randomized patients of whom 45% received BB were analyzed. There were no significant demographic or clinical differences between BB+ and BB- cohorts. No significant difference in inhospital mortality (adj. IRR 0.6 [95% CI 0.3-1.4], p = 0.2) or long-term functional outcome was measured between the cohorts (p = 0.3). One hundred fifty-four patients suffered isolated severe TBI of whom 44% received BB. The BB? group had significantly lower mortality relative to the BB- group (18.6% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.012). On regression analysis, propranolol had a significant protective effect on in-hospital mortality (adj. IRR 0.32, p = 0.04) and functional outcome at 6-month follow-up (GOS-E >= 5 adj. IRR 1.2, p = 0.02).

Conclusion: Propranolol decreases in-hospital mortality and improves long-term functional outcome in isolated severe TBI. This randomized trial speaks in favor of routine administration of beta-blocker therapy as part of a standardized neurointensive care protocol.

Level of evidence: Level II; therapeutic.

Study type: Therapeutic study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79883 (URN)10.1007/s00268-020-05391-8 (DOI)000510269300001 ()32002583 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Research department of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences  1396-01-3814792

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Pettersson-Pablo, P., Cao, Y., Bäckström, T., Nilsson, T. K. & Hurtig-Wennlöf, A. (2020). Body fat percentage and CRP correlates with a composite score of vascular risk markers in healthy, young adults: The Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Atherosclerosis (LBA) study. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, 20(1), Article ID 77.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body fat percentage and CRP correlates with a composite score of vascular risk markers in healthy, young adults: The Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Atherosclerosis (LBA) study
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2020 (English)In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Identification of early signs of atherosclerosis in young adults have the potential to guide early interventions to prevent later cardiovascular disease. We therefore analyzed measures of vascular structure and function and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in a sample of young healthy adults.

METHODS: Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), carotid-intima media thickness (cIMT) and augmentation index (AIX) were measured in 834 healthy non-smokers (ages 18.0-25.9). Emphasis was put on discriminating between individuals having a vascular structure and function associated with a higher or lower risk, and cluster analysis algorithms were employed to assign the subjects into groups based on these vascular measurements. In addition, a vascular status score (VSS) was calculated by summarizing the results according to quintiles of the vascular measurements. The associations between VSS and cardiovascular biomarkers were examined by regression analyses.

RESULTS: The cluster analyses did not yield sufficiently distinct clustering (groups of individuals that could be categorized unequivocally as having either a vascular structure and function associated with a higher or lower CVD risk). VSS proved a better classificatory variable. The associations between VSS and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk were analyzed by univariable and multivariable regressions. Only body fat percentage and C-reactive protein (CRP) were independently associated with VSS.

CONCLUSIONS: A VSS calculation, which integrates PWV, cIMT, and AIX measurements is better suited for cardiovascular risk evaluation in young adults than cluster analyses. The independent associations of VSS with body fat percentage and CRP highlight the decisive role of adiposity and systemic inflammation in early atherosclerotic progression and suggests a subordinate role of insulin and lipid metabolism in this age span.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020
Keywords
Atherosclerosis, Body fat percentage, CRP, Cardiovascular risk, Cluster analysis, Endothelial dysfunction, Obesity, Young adults
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79924 (URN)10.1186/s12872-020-01376-6 (DOI)32046640 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Tsapournas, G., Hellström, P. M., Cao, Y. & Olsson, L. I. (2020). Diagnostic accuracy of a quantitative faecal immunochemical test vs. symptoms suspected for colorectal cancer in patients referred for colonoscopy. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic accuracy of a quantitative faecal immunochemical test vs. symptoms suspected for colorectal cancer in patients referred for colonoscopy
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: Determine diagnostic accuracy of a quantitative faecal immunochemical haemoglobin test (QuikRead go® FIT, Orion Diagnostica Oy) in symptomatic patients referred for colonoscopy, at various cut-offs and for one or two tests.

Methods: Patients referred to four endoscopy units in mid-Sweden between 2013 and 2017 provided information on lower abdominal symptoms and faecal samples from two separate days prior to colonoscopy.

Results: In all, 5.4% (13/242) patients had colorectal cancer (CRC). For one FIT at cut-off 10 µg Hb/g faeces, sensitivity for CRC was 92% (95% CI 78-100%) and specificity 77% (95% CI 72-83%); equal to 74%; 95% CI 68-80 (178/242) colonoscopies potentially avoidable and one CRC missed. Based on the maximal outcome of two FITs, sensitivity was 100%, specificity 71% (66-77%) and 68%; 95% CI 62-74 (160/237) colonoscopies potentially avoidable. Among 17% (42/242) patients with one FIT of >200 µg Hb/g faeces, 85% (11/13) had CRC. Positive predictive values of FIT varied 16.9-26.2% depending on cut-off and one or two FITs, whereas NPVs were 99% and above in all scenarios.In 60 patients reporting rectal bleeding, one FIT at cut-off 10 µg Hb/g discriminated well between CRC and other conditions (p = .001). In regression models, FIT was more important than age, sex and all symptoms.

Conclusion: One or two FITs in symptomatic patients referred for colonoscopy imply powerful risk stratification abilities for CRC, even among patients reporting rectal bleeding. Larger studies in various settings will clarify how to make the best use of this opportunity.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrails.gov NCT02491593.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Occult blood, ROC curve, colonoscopy, colorectal neoplasms, sensitivity and specificity, signs and symptoms
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-78971 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2019.1708965 (DOI)000505866600001 ()31906738 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Kuria, A., Fang, X., Li, M., Han, H., He, J., Aaseth, J. O. & Cao, Y. (2020). Does dietary intake of selenium protect against cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based prospective studies. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, 60(4), 684-694
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does dietary intake of selenium protect against cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based prospective studies
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2020 (English)In: Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, ISSN 1040-8398, E-ISSN 1549-7852, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 684-694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current evidence on selenium and its effects on cancer is conflicting. This study aimed at assessing the association between dietary intake of selenium and incidence of cancers by performing systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based prospective studies. We systematically searched for articles in Medline (Ovid), Embase, Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database and VIP Chinese Scientific Journals. Analysis was performed in Stata version 14.2. Of the 2,564 articles obtained from the databases, 39 met our inclusion criteria, 37 were included in the final analysis. Selenium at recommended daily allowance levels of ≥55 μg/day decreased the risk of cancer [relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90-0.98]. A protective effect was found in men at levels ≥55 μg/day (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99). Extra selenium intake from supplements was protective at levels ≥55 μg/day (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.97). There was an inverse relationship (p value = 0.020) between selenium intake and overall cancer risk after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking but there was no evidence of nonlinear relationship (p value = 0.261). The findings in this study suggest that selenium is protective against cancer however the effects vary with different cancers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Nutrition, cancer, diet, incidence, meta-analysis, population, prospective study, selenium, systematic review
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70882 (URN)10.1080/10408398.2018.1548427 (DOI)000507267000010 ()30570346 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077867905 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, E., Mohseni, S., Cao, Y. & Näslund, E. (2020). Limited Effect of Beta-blockade on Postoperative Outcome After Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery. Obesity Surgery, 30(1), 139-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limited Effect of Beta-blockade on Postoperative Outcome After Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery
2020 (English)In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The benefit of beta-blockade on postoperative outcome remains controversial, though recent studies have suggested a role during major non-cardiac surgery. The benefit of beta-blockade during minimally invasive gastric bypass surgery remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible association between preoperative beta-blocker therapy and postoperative outcome after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

METHODS: Patients operated with primary laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in Sweden between 2007 and 2017 were identified through the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry. The dataset was linked to the Swedish National Patient Registry, the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry, and Statistics Sweden. The main outcome was serious postoperative complication within 30 days of surgery; with postoperative complication, 90-day and 1-year mortality, and weight loss at 2 years after surgery as secondary endpoints. The Poisson regression model was used to evaluate primary and secondary categorical outcomes. A general mixed model was performed to evaluate 2-year weight loss.

RESULTS: In all, 50281 patients were included in the study. No difference was seen between patients on beta-blockade and the control group regarding postoperative complications (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.04 (95%CI 0.93-1.15), p = 0.506), serious postoperative complication (adjusted IRR 1.06 95%CI 0.89-1.27), p = 0.515), 90-day mortality (adjusted IRR 0.71 (95%CI 0.24-2.10), p = 0.537), and 1-year mortality (adjusted IRR 1.26 (95%CI 0.67-2.36), p = 0.467). Weight loss 2 years after surgery was slightly greater in patients on beta-blockade (adjusted coefficient 0.53 (95%CI 0.19-0.87), p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS: Beta-blockade has limited impact on postoperative outcome after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2020
Keywords
Beta-blockade, Gastric bypass, Postoperative outcome
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75571 (URN)10.1007/s11695-019-04108-8 (DOI)31346982 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Brand, J., Hiyoshi, A., Cao, Y., Lawlor, D. A., Cnattingius, S. & Montgomery, S. (2020). Maternal smoking during pregnancy and fractures in offspring: national register based sibling comparison study. BMJ. British Medical Journal, 368, Article ID l7057.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal smoking during pregnancy and fractures in offspring: national register based sibling comparison study
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2020 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 368, article id l7057Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To study the impact of maternal smoking during pregnancy on fractures in offspring during different developmental stages of life.

DESIGN: National register based birth cohort study with a sibling comparison design.

SETTING: Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: 1 680 307 people born in Sweden between 1983 and 2000 to women who smoked (n=377 367, 22.5%) and did not smoke (n=1 302 940) in early pregnancy. Follow-up was until 31 December 2014.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Fractures by attained age up to 32 years.

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 21.1 years, 377 970 fractures were observed (the overall incidence rate for fracture standardised by calendar year of birth was 11.8 per 1000 person years). The association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and risk of fracture in offspring differed by attained age. Maternal smoking was associated with a higher rate of fractures in offspring before 1 year of age in the entire cohort (birth year standardised fracture rates in those exposed and unexposed to maternal smoking were 1.59 and 1.28 per 1000 person years, respectively). After adjustment for potential confounders the hazard ratio for maternal smoking compared with no smoking was 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.45). This association followed a dose dependent pattern (compared with no smoking, hazard ratios for 1-9 cigarettes/day and >= 10 cigarettes/day were 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.39) and 1.41 (1.18 to 1.69), respectively) and persisted in within-sibship comparisons although with wider confidence intervals (compared with no smoking, 1.58 (1.01 to 2.46)). Maternal smoking during pregnancy was also associated with an increased fracture incidence in offspring from age 5 to 32 years in whole cohort analyses, but these associations did not follow a dose dependent gradient. In within-sibship analyses, which controls for confounding by measured and unmeasured shared familial factors, corresponding point estimates were all close to null. Maternal smoking was not associated with risk of fracture in offspring between the ages of 1 and 5 years in any of the models.

CONCLUSION: Prenatal exposure to maternal smoking is associated with an increased rate of fracture during the first year of life but does not seem to have a long lasting biological influence on fractures later in childhood and up to early adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2020
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79884 (URN)10.1136/bmj.l7057 (DOI)000510390400002 ()31996343 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078689979 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Orebro University Hospital Research Foundation Nyckelfonden OLL-695391

Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) ES/JO19119/1

Medical Research Council UK (MRC) MC_UU_00011/6

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) NF-0616-10102

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Tian, Q., Li, M., Montgomery, S., Fang, B., Wang, C., Xia, T. & Cao, Y. (2020). Short-Term Associations of Fine Particulate Matter and Synoptic Weather Types with Cardiovascular Mortality: An Ecological Time-Series Study in Shanghai, China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(3), Article ID E1111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-Term Associations of Fine Particulate Matter and Synoptic Weather Types with Cardiovascular Mortality: An Ecological Time-Series Study in Shanghai, China
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 3, article id E1111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Exposures to both ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and extreme weather conditions have been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths in numerous epidemiologic studies. However, evidence on the associations with CVD deaths for interaction effects between PM2.5 and weather conditions is still limited. This study aimed to investigate associations of exposures to PM2.5 and weather conditions with cardiovascular mortality, and further to investigate the synergistic or antagonistic effects of ambient air pollutants and synoptic weather types (SWTs). Methods: Information on daily CVD deaths, air pollution, and meteorological conditions between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014 was obtained in Shanghai, China. Generalized additive models were used to assess the associations of daily PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological factors with CVD deaths. A 15-day lag analysis was conducted using a polynomial distributed lag model to access the lag patterns for associations with PM2.5. Results: During the study period, the total number of CVD deaths in Shanghai was 59,486, with a daily mean of 54.3 deaths. The average daily PM2.5 concentration was 55.0 µg/m3. Each 10 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration was associated with a 1.26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40%, 2.12%) increase in CVD mortality. No SWT was statistically significantly associated with CVD deaths. For the interaction between PM2.5 and SWT, statistically significant interactions were found between PM2.5 and cold weather, with risk for PM2.5 in cold dry SWT decreasing by 1.47% (95% CI: 0.54%, 2.39%), and in cold humid SWT the risk decreased by 1.45% (95% CI: 0.52%, 2.36%). In the lag effect analysis, statistically significant positive associations were found for PM2.5 in the 1-3 lag days, while no statistically significant effects were found for other lag day periods. Conclusions: Exposure to PM2.5 was associated with short-term increased risk of cardiovascular deaths with some lag effects, while the cold weather may have an antagonistic effect with PM2.5. However, the ecological study design limited the possibility to identify a causal relationship, so prospective studies with individual level data are warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
PM2.5, air pollution, antagonistic effect, cardiovascular mortality, fine particulate matter, interaction effect, lag effect, synergistic effect, synoptic weather type, weather
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-79921 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17031111 (DOI)32050549 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Ahl, R., Matthiessen, P., Fang, X., Cao, Y., Sjölin, G., Lindgren, R., . . . Mohseni, S. (2020). β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes. Annals of Surgery, 271(1), 140-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes
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2020 (English)In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, no 1, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether regular β-blocker exposure can improve short- and long-term outcomes after rectal cancer surgery.

BACKGROUND: Surgery for rectal cancer is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence to suggest that there is a survival benefit in patients exposed to β-blockers undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies investigating the effects on outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for rectal cancer are lacking.

METHODS: All adult patients undergoing elective abdominal resection for rectal cancer over a 10-year period were recruited from the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Patients were subdivided according to preoperative β-blocker exposure status. Outcomes of interest were 30-day complications, 30-day cause-specific mortality, and 1-year all-cause mortality. The association between β-blocker use and outcomes were analyzed using Poisson regression model with robust standard errors for 30-day complications and cause-specific mortality. One-year survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

RESULTS: A total of 11,966 patients were included in the current study, of whom 3513 (29.36%) were exposed to regular preoperative β-blockers. A significant decrease in 30-day mortality was detected (incidence rate ratio = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.13, P < 0.001). Deaths of cardiovascular nature, respiratory origin, sepsis, and multiorgan failure were significantly lower in β-blocker users, as were the incidences in postoperative infection and anastomotic failure. The β-blocker positive group had significantly better survival up to 1 year postoperatively with a risk reduction of 57% (hazard ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.52, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative β-blocker use is strongly associated with improved survival and morbidity after abdominal resection for rectal cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2020
National Category
Surgery Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74248 (URN)10.1097/SLA.0000000000002970 (DOI)30048321 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077036188 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Cao, Y., Fang, X., Ottosson, J., Näslund, E. & Stenberg, E. (2019). A Comparative Study of Machine Learning Algorithms in Predicting Severe Complications after Bariatric Surgery. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(5), Article ID 668.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparative Study of Machine Learning Algorithms in Predicting Severe Complications after Bariatric Surgery
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Severe obesity is a global public health threat of growing proportions. Accurate models to predict severe postoperative complications could be of value in the preoperative assessment of potential candidates for bariatric surgery. So far, traditional statistical methods have failed to produce high accuracy. We aimed to find a useful machine learning (ML) algorithm to predict the risk for severe complication after bariatric surgery.

Methods: We trained and compared 29 supervised ML algorithms using information from 37,811 patients that operated with a bariatric surgical procedure between 2010 and 2014 in Sweden. The algorithms were then tested on 6250 patients operated in 2015. We performed the synthetic minority oversampling technique tackling the issue that only 3% of patients experienced severe complications.

Results: Most of the ML algorithms showed high accuracy (>90%) and specificity (>90%) in both the training and test data. However, none of the algorithms achieved an acceptable sensitivity in the test data. We also tried to tune the hyperparameters of the algorithms to maximize sensitivity, but did not yet identify one with a high enough sensitivity that can be used in clinical praxis in bariatric surgery. However, a minor, but perceptible, improvement in deep neural network (NN) ML was found.

Conclusion: In predicting the severe postoperative complication among the bariatric surgery patients, ensemble algorithms outperform base algorithms. When compared to other ML algorithms, deep NN has the potential to improve the accuracy and it deserves further investigation. The oversampling technique should be considered in the context of imbalanced data where the number of the interested outcome is relatively small.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
machine learning, bariatric surgery, severe complication, prediction, comparative study
National Category
Surgery General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75270 (URN)10.3390/jcm8050668 (DOI)000470992500103 ()31083643 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilNovo Nordisk
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro Region County Council  

Örebro University 

SRP Diabetes

Available from: 2019-07-24 Created: 2019-07-24 Last updated: 2019-07-24Bibliographically approved
Xu, F., Huang, K., Wang, Y., Xu, Y., Ma, L. & Cao, Y. (2019). A Questionnaire Study on the Attitude towards Death of the Nursing Interns in Eight Teaching Hospitals in Jiangsu, China. BioMed Research International, 2019, Article ID 3107692.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Questionnaire Study on the Attitude towards Death of the Nursing Interns in Eight Teaching Hospitals in Jiangsu, China
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2019 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2019, article id 3107692Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Nurses play an important role in caring for dying patients. However, little is known about the attitude towards death of the registered nurses in China.

Materials and Methods: A knowledge, attitude, and the practice (KAP) survey using standardized questionnaires was conducted at eight teaching hospitals in Jiangsu Province, China. In total, 366 nursing interns were recruited and 357 turned in valid response. Data about the interns' demographic characteristics and their attitudes to death in five domains, including fear of death, death avoidance, natural acceptance, approach acceptance, and escape acceptance, were collected.

Results: Compared to the norms, the nursing interns had statistically significantly higher scores in the domains death avoidance, approach acceptance, and fear of death (14.9 vs. 11.1, 26.2 vs. 24.2, and 20.3 vs. 19.0, respectively); however, statistically significantly lower scores were in the domains natural acceptance and escape acceptance (18.4 vs. 22.0, and 13.6 vs. 15.1, respectively). Religious belief, experience of a deceased relative in family, death education, and family atmosphere of discussing death are positively associated with one or more domains of attitude towards death.

Conclusion: The positive attitude towards death and death education before clinical practice are helpful for nursing interns when they care for dying patients. In general, the scores of attitude towards death are at a moderate level in the surveyed Chinese nursing interns. The death education for nursing students needs to be reinforced in China.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77821 (URN)10.1155/2019/3107692 (DOI)000492936800001 ()31637256 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072984891 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Education Research Grant of Nanjing Medical University, China  YB2017114

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3552-9153

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