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Öhman, Marie
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Andersson, J., Öhman, M. & Garrison, J. (2018). Physical education teaching as a caring act: techniques of bodily touch and the paradox of caring. Sport, Education and Society, 23(6), 591-606
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical education teaching as a caring act: techniques of bodily touch and the paradox of caring
2018 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 591-606Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we investigate “no touch policies” as a practical teacher concern that includes the body as a location, a source, and a means in educational activity. We argue that to understand issues regarding physical touch within school practice we must conceive it as deeply associated with specific teaching techniques. Thus, the didactical challenge is not found in argumentations about the pro and cons of physical touch, but through analysis of how teachers handle student interaction and teaching intentions.

We consider teaching as a caring profession. Caring, as a practical teacher concern, requires wisdom regarding the right time to use bodily touch and to refrain from such use. This wisdom involves the ability to discern people’s needs, desires, interests, and purposes in particular situations and act appropriately. From a body pedagogical perspective we approach intergenerational touch not only as a discursive and power related question but as an essential tension in the intersection of the; ambiguity attendant to any intentional act such as teaching, the conflict between the ethics of care and the ethics of justice, and finally, the paradox of caring.

We draw on interviews with PE-teachers in Swedish primary, secondary, and upper-secondary schools and analyses of a collection of techniques of bodily touch that are established and practiced with specific pedagogical purposes. The results shows PE teacher’s competence in handling different functions of intergenerational touch in relation to three different techniques of bodily touch; 1) Security touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle the fragile; 2) Denoting touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle learning content; 3) Relational touch, which is characterized by caring intentions. Each of these is of importance for the teachers in carrying out their call to teach and each of these relies on professional assessments whether or not it meets its intended purpose.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Caring, body pedagogics, corporeal realism, non-touch, technique, teaching intention
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55284 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2016.1244765 (DOI)000433325800006 ()2-s2.0-84992741059 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Pedagogical consequences of no touching in Physical Education
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Forest, E., Lenzen, B. & Öhman, M. (2018). Teaching traditions in physical education in France, Switzerland and Sweden: A special focus on official curricula for gymnastics and fitness training. European Educational Research Journal (online), 17(1), 71-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching traditions in physical education in France, Switzerland and Sweden: A special focus on official curricula for gymnastics and fitness training
2018 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 71-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss similarities and differences between the curricula for physical education (PE) in secondary schools in Sweden, France and the canton of Geneva (Switzerland) in the light of PE teaching traditions (PETTs). Teaching traditions concern ideas about the goals of school disciplines and therefore about the kind of learning pupils are expected to acquire. The paper focuses more specifically on two subjects, gymnastics and fitness training, because these physical activities are liable to highlight the similarities and differences across contexts in terms of didactic transposition. A content analysis of current curriculum materials of the three countries was conducted taking the following dimensions into account: (a) the general structure of the curriculum texts; (b) the general recommendations; and (c) the learning outcomes expected from the pupils in terms of knowledge and values, with examples of contents in gymnastics and fitness training. The results show the entanglement of various PETTs in each country: PETT as Sport-Techniques primarily shapes French and Swiss-Genevan curricula, PETT as Health Education is more present in Sweden and, to a lesser extent, in Switzerland, while PETT as Physical Culture Education tends to be more visible in France.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Physical Education, teaching traditions, curriculum, comparative analysis, didactic transposition
National Category
Didactics Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62088 (URN)10.1177/1474904117708889 (DOI)000418959000005 ()2-s2.0-85039904755 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Komparativ didaktik
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-5023
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Öhman, M., Segolsson, J., Quennerstedt, A., Lennqvist Lindén, A.-S. & Tolgfors, P. (2017). Fysisk beröring mellan lärare och elev i utbildningssammanhang. In: Jonas Almqvist, Karim Hamza, Anette Olin (Ed.), Undersöka och utveckla undervisning: Professionell utveckling för lärare (pp. 155-171). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fysisk beröring mellan lärare och elev i utbildningssammanhang
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2017 (Swedish)In: Undersöka och utveckla undervisning: Professionell utveckling för lärare / [ed] Jonas Almqvist, Karim Hamza, Anette Olin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 155-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62118 (URN)978-91-44-11417-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Öhman, M. (2017). Losing touch: Teachers’ self-regulation in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 23(3), 297-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Losing touch: Teachers’ self-regulation in physical education
2017 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 297-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The question of physical interaction is especially relevant in school physical education, where a lot of the teaching and activities are based on body movements. However, the issue of ‘touching’ has been questioned in recent years. This paper takes its starting point in the discourse of child protection and the growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings. The purpose is to examine PE teachers’ self-regulation in relation to the child protection discourse and no touch policies. What sort of strategies have the teachers developed for dealing with physical contact in their teaching? It is a matter of problematising teachers’ pedagogical interactions in PE practice.

The study takes its starting point in a discourse-analytical tradition using a methodology based on Foucault’s ideas about governmentality. Twenty-three teachers (10 women and 13 men) aged 30–63 and at different stages in their careers were interviewed. The results show two different self-regulating processes: (1) adaptation using avoidance-oriented strategies and (2) resistance using downplaying-oriented strategies. The paper discusses potential consequences for PE teachers’ pedagogical work if they feel that they have to protect themselves instead of operating in a way that is in the best interest for students’ learning and development. The study aims to contribute to the literature on child protection and ‘no touch’ policies and to a more multifaceted understanding of physical interaction in PE. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Physical Education, physical interaction, touching, Foucault, self-regulation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy; Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50075 (URN)10.1177/1356336X15622159 (DOI)000405451900003 ()2-s2.0-85023747375 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Öhman, M. & Quennerstedt, A. (2017). Questioning the no-touch discourse in physical education from a children's rights perspective. Sport, Education and Society, 22(3), 305-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Questioning the no-touch discourse in physical education from a children's rights perspective
2017 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 305-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we question the rationality of ‘no–touch policies’ and offer an alternative approach to the matter of physical contact between teachers and students in the context of physical education in schools. Earlier research has drawn attention to how a discourse of child protection is starting to affect how physical contact is viewed in physical education (PE) practice. The avoidance of intergenerational touch is increasingly justified by referring to the children’s rights agenda. Here, arguments for ‘no-touching’ are linked to children’s right to be protected from harm. In the paper we explore a children’s rights based viewpoint that supports the use of and need for physical contact in PE teaching by developing theoretical and practice based arguments. An alternative children’s rights perspective, based on rights theorising, is used to formulate the theoretical argument. Interviews with 16 PE teachers about their experiences of physical contact in their pedagogical work form the practice-based arguments. The two arguments provide a way of looking at intergenerational touch in education from the vantage point of children’s human right to develop to their full potential, which can support a need for physical touch in pedagogical situations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
touching, intergenerational touch, child protection policy, children’s rights, physical education
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47020 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2015.1030384 (DOI)000398185600001 ()2-s2.0-84927544506 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF)

Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Larsson, H., Quennerstedt, M., Caldeborg, A., Janemalm, L., Ridderlund, S., Segolsson, J., . . . Öhman, M. (2017). Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!. In: : . Paper presented at British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61026 (URN)
Conference
British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017
Projects
Forskarskolan idrott och hälsas didaktik
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Caldeborg, A., Maivorsdotter, N. & Öhman, M. (2017). Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE. Sport, Education and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE
2017 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behaviour that could be regarded as suspicious (Fletcher, 2013; Öhman, 2016; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013). Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Intergenerational touch, physical education, student perspective, didactic contract, physical contact
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62117 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2017.1346600 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021831746 (Scopus ID)
Projects
“Don’t touch! – Pedagogical consequences of the ‘forbidden’ body in Physical Education”
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Caldeborg, A., Maivorsdotter, N. & Öhman, M. (2017). Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE. In: : . Paper presented at European Educational Research Association (ECER), Copenhagen, Denmark, 22-25 Aug, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62119 (URN)
Conference
European Educational Research Association (ECER), Copenhagen, Denmark, 22-25 Aug, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, J., Meckbach, J., Öhman, M. & Quennerstedt, M. (2016). How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health. SAGE Open, 6(4), 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health
2016 (English)In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 The use of educational computer games in physical education (PE) has become more popular in recent years and has attracted research interest. The aim of the article is to investigate how physical activities and images of the human body are offered by the game. The results show how the “teacher” constituted in the games is one who instructs and encourages the players to exercise and think about their bodies, but not a “teacher” who can help students to investigate, argue, or discuss images of health and the human body. We argue that the use of a wide range and variety of ways of teaching would make the teaching richer and offer a deeper understanding about the body and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, USA: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Teaching, artifact, physical education, exergames
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54022 (URN)10.1177/2158244016682995 (DOI)2-s2.0-85008975757 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Öhman, J., Öhman, M. & Klas, S. (2016). Outdoor recreation in exergames: a new step in the detachment from nature?. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 16(4), 285-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor recreation in exergames: a new step in the detachment from nature?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 285-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new teaching aid—exergames—is increasing in popularity in schools and is regarded as an interesting, varied and effective way of improving students’ fitness. These exercise television games often contain references to physical activities carried out in different outdoor landscapes. The purpose of this article is to examine the views of landscape and nature offered by the games and the consequences this may have for students’ relationships with nature and future environmental commitment. The methodological approach used is companion meaning analysis: the meaning of nature that follows when playing the games. The results show a controlled landscape that is perfectly arranged for the activity (functional specialisation). It is an obvious anthropocentric base and commands an instrumental value where nature is valuable because it satisfies our felt preferences (demand value). Exergames can thus be seen as a further step in an ongoing detachment process from the physical landscape (indoorisation).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Exergames, Wii, environmental concern, physical education, the concept of nature, environmental ethics
National Category
Pedagogy Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education; Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy; Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48745 (URN)10.1080/14729679.2016.1147965 (DOI)000386365200001 ()2-s2.0-84959059323 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Learning and Exergames in School
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-02-25 Created: 2016-02-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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