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Mukamurenzi, S., Grönlund, Å. & Islam, M. S. (2019). Challenges in Implementing Citizen-centric e-Government Services in Rwanda. Electronic Government, an International Journal, 15(3), 283-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in Implementing Citizen-centric e-Government Services in Rwanda
2019 (English)In: Electronic Government, an International Journal, ISSN 1740-7494, E-ISSN 1740-7508, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 283-302Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Electronic government (e-government) faces challenges impeding its successful implementation. In the least developed countries, where e-government initiatives are developing but little research is done, it is difficult to know how to move forward with the development. As a contribution to increased knowledge, this study identifies e-government challenges in Rwanda. To this end, the study takes an interpretive approach and, from interviews and document analysis, identifies key e-government challenges. Those challenges include lack of a change management strategy, limited cooperation, language and literacy barriers, incomplete automation, difficulties with system integration, and a lack of intermediaries' management mechanisms. This paper analyses the challenges service providers would have to manage for e-government to improve and informs policymakers of the areas that need their attention for Rwanda to evolve towards the desired e-government. The study contributes to the yet scarce literature of e-government in Rwanda.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2019
Keywords
challenges, citizen-centric e-government, developing country, digital government, East Africa, electronic government, e-government development, e-government services, Rwanda
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70148 (URN)10.1504/EG.2019.10016243 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Kempe, A.-L. & Grönlund, Å. (2019). Collaborative digital textbooks - a comparison of five different designs shaping teaching and learning. Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, 24(5), 2909-2941
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative digital textbooks - a comparison of five different designs shaping teaching and learning
2019 (English)In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 2909-2941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collaborative Digital Text Books (cDTB) are emerging artifacts in Swedish schools, combining the quality assured content of traditional paper and digital text books with affordances for multimodal representation of knowledge, differentiated instruction, communication, collaboration, documentation and with varying learning activities. cDTB are meant to cover the content of the curriculum and provide a consistent learning environment. We analyzed and compared design features in five brands on the market 2017. The analytic comparison indicated that the studied cDTB are built on differing notions of how knowledge is represented as well as on how learners and teachers were supposed to engage with the content. The analysis revealed three types of cDTB distinguished by the way the information and social artifacts are designed. Type 1 resembles a traditional text book with limited multimodal representations of content, tools for working with the content, and tools for communication. Type 2, conversely, is rich in all these aspects but still rely on mainly pre-fabricated content. Type 3 takes a radical approach to content production and leaves it completely up to teachers to produce and share content. The result suggests three very different roles and levels of influence for the cDTB users. Regarding content, the study shows that cDTB are more versatile and quality confirmed learning environments in comparison with: digital "book in a box"; learning designs employing scattered digital resources that are not quality assured; and various digital tools that have no clear connection with the curriculum. The paper contributes to practice with the understanding that before starting to use cDTB there is a need to grasp that the choice of digital learning environment is a choice among very different designs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Cooperative, collaborative learning, Improving classroom teaching, Interactive learning environments, Pedagogical issues, Knowledge representations, Digital textbooks, Middle school
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76439 (URN)10.1007/s10639-019-09897-0 (DOI)000482394200015 ()2-s2.0-85064440928 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Eriksson, M., Böö, R. & Grönlund, Å. (2019). Coping with narcolepsy after Pandemrix®vaccination using a Facebook forum. In: : . Paper presented at 6th Nordic Narcolepsy Symposium, Uppsala, Sweden, 7-8 februari, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping with narcolepsy after Pandemrix®vaccination using a Facebook forum
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Narcolepsy, Social Media
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72362 (URN)
Conference
6th Nordic Narcolepsy Symposium, Uppsala, Sweden, 7-8 februari, 2019
Projects
LISAN
Available from: 2019-02-09 Created: 2019-02-09 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Susha, I., Grönlund, Å. & Van Tulder, R. (2019). Data driven social partnerships: Exploring an emergent trend in search of research challenges and questions. Government Information Quarterly, 36(1), 112-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data driven social partnerships: Exploring an emergent trend in search of research challenges and questions
2019 (English)In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 112-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The volume of data collected by multiple devices, such as mobile phones, sensors, satellites, is growing at an exponential rate. Accessing and aggregating different sources of data, including data outside the public domain, has the potential to provide insights for many societal challenges. This catalyzes new forms of partnerships between public, private, and nongovernmental actors aimed at leveraging different sources of data for positive societal impact and the public good. In practice there are different terms in use to label these partnerships but research has been lagging behind in systematically examining this trend. In this paper, we deconstruct the conceptualization and examine the characteristics of this emerging phenomenon by systematically reviewing academic and practitioner literature. To do so, we use the grounded theory literature review method. We identify several concepts which are used to describe this phenomenon and propose an integrative definition of “data driven social partnerships” based on them. We also identify a list of challenges which data driven social partnerships face and explore the most urgent and most cited ones, thereby proposing a research agenda. Finally, we discuss the main contributions of this emerging research field, in relation to the challenges, and systematize the knowledge base about this phenomenon for the research community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Data partnership, Data collaborative, Data philanthropy, Data donation, Big data, Collaboration
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71099 (URN)10.1016/j.giq.2018.11.002 (DOI)000465158500014 ()2-s2.0-85057780329 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-06563
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Agélii Genlott, A., Grönlund, Å. & Viberg, O. (2019). Disseminating digital innovation in school - leading second-order educational change. Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, 24(5), 3021-3039
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disseminating digital innovation in school - leading second-order educational change
2019 (English)In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 3021-3039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using digital technology effectively in schools requires profound changes in traditional teaching and learning activities. Pedagogical innovations often start small-scale and developing good ideas into shared practice across schools is challenging in many ways, especially if the innovation requires second-order change, i.e. challenges to fundamental beliefs about teaching and learning. This study investigates how a validated pedagogical method requiring integrated Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use and second-order change can be disseminated and sustained over time. We surveyed 92 primary school teachers who at different times over a 5-year period participated in a training course designed to implement an innovative technology-supported teaching method, Write To Learn, across an entire city. We found that organized teacher development programs can drive second-order change, but this requires considerable, active, and sustained effort from leaders at both school and district level. Additional factors include immediate and extended social systems and handling diversity among teachers. The results are useful for both practitioners and researchers since they contribute to a deeper understanding of the opportunities and challenges involved in disseminating effective ICT-based methods that requires profound changes of thinking about teaching and learning to guide the transformation of teaching practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Digitalization, Educational change, Second-order-change, School, Teacher training, Diffusion of innovation
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76440 (URN)10.1007/s10639-019-09908-0 (DOI)000482394200020 ()2-s2.0-85064651327 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University

Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Mukamurenzi, S., Grönlund, Å. & Islam, M. S. (2019). Improving qualities of e‐government services in Rwanda: A service provider perspective. Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving qualities of e‐government services in Rwanda: A service provider perspective
2019 (English)In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

E‐government implementation is growing worldwide. In the context of developed countries, as well as some developing ones, research provides tools to evaluate e‐government services and reflect on e‐government performance. However, in the least developed countries (LDCs), where the preconditions are in many ways more challenging, little is known about those services. While information technology can be imported, social, organizational, and infrastructural arrangements conducive to high‐quality service delivery must be developed locally. In contributing to understanding the challenges as well as opportunities involved, this paper explores the qualities of e‐government services in Rwanda, an East African LDC. The investigation focuses on service providers' views of the qualities, as it is only through their understanding of the situation that service quality can be improved. This is a qualitative study based on interviews with employees of government organizations and document analysis. We identify and discuss 28 e‐government service quality factors, which are grouped into nine quality dimensions—accessibility, availability, awareness, responsiveness, information quality, information security, ease of use, support, and cost. This research contributes to raising awareness about the qualities of e‐government services in Rwanda in particular but may also have relevance for other LDCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
East Africa, e‐government service quality, evaluation, least developed country, Rwanda, service provider
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73680 (URN)10.1002/isd2.12089 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Mutimukwe, C., Kolkowska, E. & Grönlund, Å. (2019). Information privacy practices in eGovernment in an African Least Developing Country, Rwanda. Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, 85(2), Article ID e12074.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information privacy practices in eGovernment in an African Least Developing Country, Rwanda
2019 (English)In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 85, no 2, article id e12074Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Privacy of information is a critical issue for e-government development as lack of it negatively influences users’ trust and adoption of e-government. To earn user trust government organizations need to provide reliable privacy assurance by implementing adequate information privacy protection (IPP) practices. African Least Developing Countries (LDCs) today develop e-government but focus is on quick technical development and the status of IPP issues is not clear. Little research has yet studied the status of IPP practices in e-government in African LDCs. To fill this gap, we assess the status of existing IPP practices in e-government in Rwanda, using international privacy principles as an assessment baseline. We adopt a case-study approach including three cases. Data were collected by interviews and a survey. The findings call into question the efficacy of existing IPP practices and their effect in ensuring e-government service users’ privacy protection in Rwanda. The study extends existing literature by providing insights related to privacy protection from an African LDC context. For practitioners in Rwanda and other LDCs, this study contributes to the protection of information privacy in e-government by providing recommendations to mitigate identified gaps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Information privacy practices, privacy principles, e-government, African LDCs, Rwanda
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71433 (URN)10.1002/isd2.12074 (DOI)000460947600003 ()2-s2.0-85060769634 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-12 Created: 2019-01-12 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Bakunzibake, P., Grönlund, Å. & Klein, G. O. (2019). Organisational Challenges in the Implementation of ‘one-stop’ e-Government in Rwanda. Electronic Journal of e-Government, 17(1), 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organisational Challenges in the Implementation of ‘one-stop’ e-Government in Rwanda
2019 (English)In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One-stop e-government holds potential benefits in all contexts and especially in the context of developing countries and in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs). Implementation of one-stop e-government can be challenging as it normally requires addressing a number of organisational issues including those related to the integration of the individual government information systems of different departments which traditionally function as silos; tackling organisational issues can be difficult due to the nature of the public sector. However, the contemporary literature paints a picture of scarce research on the organisational issues that impede the implementation of one-stop e-government initiatives in LDCs. This paper explores the organisational issues underlying the implementation of ‘one-stop’ e-government initiatives in Rwanda, an LDC. The study explores the status of these elements as of and up to March 2017. The qualitative case study methodology used for this study involved data collection by means of documents and interviews with key managers from central government organisations, from a private company, and from local government service clerks. Template analysis was used as a method for data analysis. Even though the number of online services for citizens, businesses, and other agencies is growing rapidly and easy payment of service fees is available, a number of organisational issues were identified. These include the lack of a clear plan of ‘to-be’ service processes and a corresponding change management strategy. Service re-design was taking place very much ad hoc. There were also unclear systematic organisational learning mechanisms and unclear operational goals in the local government. Addressing these issues would contribute towards improving the implementation of one-stop e-government and its corresponding services in such a context. The paper contributes to research by providing insights into organisational issues in a country currently in an early stage of e-government development. For Rwandan e-government professionals, the paper suggests a way forward. It also helps decision makers in Rwanda and similar countries undertaking one-stop initiatives to understand the problem context of actions taken towards IT-driven institutional reform.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences Limited, 2019
Keywords
One-stop e-government, e-government organisational challenges, Rwanda
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73592 (URN)
Projects
Rwanda e-government project
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Eriksson, M., Böö, R. & Grönlund, Å. (2019). Using a Facebook Forum to Cope With Narcolepsy After Pandemrix Vaccination: Infodemiology Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(4), Article ID e11419.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using a Facebook Forum to Cope With Narcolepsy After Pandemrix Vaccination: Infodemiology Study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 4, article id e11419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In 2010, newly diagnosed narcolepsy cases among children and adolescents were seen in several European countries as a consequence of comprehensive national vaccination campaigns with Pandemrix against H1N1 influenza. Since then, a large number of people have had to live with narcolepsy and its consequences in daily life, such as effects on school life, social relationships, and activities. Initially, the adverse effects were not well understood and there was uncertainty about whether there would be any financial compensation. The situation remained unresolved until 2016, and during these years affected people sought various ways to join forces to handle the many issues involved, including setting up a social media forum.

Objective: Our aim was to examine how information was shared, and how opinions and beliefs about narcolepsy as a consequence of Pandemrix vaccination were formed through discussions on social media.

Methods: We used quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate a series of messages posted in a social media forum for people affected by narcolepsy after vaccination.

Results: Group activity was high throughout the years 2010 to 2016, with peaks corresponding to major narcolepsy-related events, such as the appearance of the first cases in 2010, the first payment of compensation in 2011, and passage of a law on compensation in July 2016. Unusually, most (462/774, 59.7%) of the group took part in discussions and only 312 of 774 (40.3%) were lurkers (compared with the usual 90% rule of thumb for participation in an online community). The conversation in the group was largely factual and had a civil tone, even though there was a long struggle for the link between the vaccine and narcolepsy to be acknowledged and regarding the compensation issue. Radical, nonscientific views, such as those expounded by the antivaccination movement, did not shape the discussions in the group but were being actively expressed elsewhere on the internet. At the outset of the pandemic, there were 18 active Swedish discussion groups on the topic, but most dissolved quickly and only one Facebook group remained active throughout the period.

Conclusions: The group studied is a good example of social media use for self-help through a difficult situation among people affected by illness and disease. This shows that social media do not by themselves induce trench warfare but, given a good group composition, can provide a necessary forum for managing an emergency situation where health care and government have failed or are mistrusted, and patients have to organize themselves so as to cope.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2019
Keywords
narcolepsy, mass vaccination, social media
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73832 (URN)10.2196/11419 (DOI)000465549900001 ()30990457 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064924908 (Scopus ID)
Projects
LISAN - Livssituation hos barn och ungdomar med narkolepsi
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Grönlund, Å. & Wiklund, M. (2018). Det digitala lärandets möjligheter: Att leda den digitala skolan. Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det digitala lärandets möjligheter: Att leda den digitala skolan
2018 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2018. p. 120
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68786 (URN)978-91-51-10112-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3713-346X

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