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Ullsten, A., Eriksson, M., Klässbo, M. & Volgsten, U. (2018). Family-centred music therapy during painful procedures in neonatal care. In: : . Paper presented at 9th Nordic Music Therapy Congress, Stockholm, Sweden, August 8-12, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family-centred music therapy during painful procedures in neonatal care
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: During the most vulnerable period in a child’s life, preterm and sick newborns are exposed to a high number of painful procedures, sometimes without the comfort of their parents. Repeated pain and frequent use of opioids can have consequences for the neurological and behaviour-oriented development of the infant.It is vital to identify a repertoire of effective non-pharmacological interventions.

Method: Preterm and term infants (n=38) were subjected to venepuncture with and without live lullaby singing, in a randomised order with a cross over design. Parent-preferred lullabies were performed live by a music  therapy student. Standard care (facilitated tucking and oral glucose) was provided for all neonates. Behavioural and physiological pain responses were assessed.

Results: Live singing with newborn infants is a social communicative interaction. If the vocal performance is predictable and regular from start, it may optimize homeostasis during painful procedures. However, the live lullaby singing did not show a statistically significant effect on the infants' pain score. There was a significantly calmer breathing pattern in the lullaby intervention versus the control condition in the pre-needle stage. There were non-significant indications of fewer and shorter skin punctures with lullaby singing.

Conclusion: The additive effect of live lullaby singing has not been shown to alleviate infants’ behavioural pain responses during venepuncture; nor has it been shown to be stressful. Pain involves the interaction of biopsychosocial and situational factors,  therefore more research is needed to explore the potential benefits of music therapy including the role of the parents.

Keywords
Pain management, infants, music therapy
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68457 (URN)
Conference
9th Nordic Music Therapy Congress, Stockholm, Sweden, August 8-12, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Ullsten, A., Eriksson, M., Klässbo, M. & Volgsten, U. (2017). Live music therapy with lullaby singing as affective support during painful procedures: a case study with microanalysis. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 26(2), 142-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Live music therapy with lullaby singing as affective support during painful procedures: a case study with microanalysis
2017 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, ISSN 0809-8131, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 142-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the most vulnerable period in a child’s life, preterm and sick infants are exposed to a high number of painful procedures, sometimes without the comfort and affection of their parents. Since repeated pain and frequent use of analgesic drugs may have consequences for the neurological and behaviour-oriented development of the infant, it is vital to identify effective non-pharmacological interventions with regard to procedural pain. This paper reviews the use of live lullaby singing as an adjuvant to the control of premature infant pain. The objectives of this case study were to analyse the live lullaby singing for two premature infants during venipuncture in comparison to standard care only, and the infants’ physiological and affective responses emerging before, during and after this procedure. The empirical data stem from a quantitative clinical study. From this larger study, two premature infants were selected. Through microanalysis, with in-depth analysis of video footage, and pain assessment with Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain (BIIP), painful standard care procedures with and without live lullaby singing, were analysed. The results show that live lullaby singing with premature infants is a communicative interaction which may optimize the homeostatic mechanisms of the infant during painful procedures. This case study shows the importance of predictability of the affective support, right from the start of the live singing intervention. It is important in a painful context that vocal interactions provide regular and comforting intensity, shape and temporal structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Pain management, premature infants, music therapy, infant directed singing, lullaby
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Health and Medical Care Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49326 (URN)10.1080/08098131.2015.1131187 (DOI)000394440800004 ()2-s2.0-84988566335 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies:

Värmland County Council, Sweden

Queen Silvia's Jubilee Fund, Sweden

Karin and Erik Gerdens Foundation, Sweden

Berit and Carl-Johan Wettergrens Foundation, Sweden

Available from: 2016-03-13 Created: 2016-03-13 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0534-4921

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